Wisconsin's Public Liberal Arts College

Supply Chain Manager


Business and Economics Department

Supply Chain Manager

Job Description:      

Reviews existing procedures and examines opportunities to streamline production, purchasing, human resources, product configuration, warehousing, distribution, and financial forecasting to meet product distribution needs. Directs activities to limit costs, improve accuracy, safety, and customer service. Makes decisions regarding the movement, storage and processing of inventory.


Related Positions:        

Director-Logistics, Material Operations & Transportation, Logistics Manager, Manager Inventory and Capacity Planning, Product Supply Director

Key Duties:

  • Utilize strategic planning to provide high customer service levels while minimizing stock costs and reducing loss.
  • Responsible for the physical custody and overall safeguarding of the inventory.
  • May be responsible for moving the product efficiently from supplier through to customers by planning, coordination and control of product.
  • Provides information, analysis and recommendations on overall operations.

Required Skills:           

Broad knowledge of the supply chain: inventory management, distribution center operations, transportation, and supplier operations; expertise in facility layout, cost control, cost benefit analysis, productivity improvement, and work simplification; strong leadership and people management skills; computer literacy required, systems development knowledge desired; background needed in problem-solving, analysis, logistics strategy, or organizational planning; and presentation skills.

Salaries:         

Salaries vary widely in this position, depending on experience, number of staff supervised and the extent of corporate fiscal responsibility. New managers may earn from $50,000 to $70,000. Those with greater responsibility earn in the range of $80,000 - $90,000. Some executives earn over $ 1 00,000.

Career Path:            

Supervisory experience in materials handling, facility layout, planning or distribution is needed. Success in supply chain management may lead to: Vice President of Operations, Director of Materials Management, or Director of Logistics.

Quotes:

"My work is very satisfying. I get to solve problems and create solutions that impact the bottom-line. The savings I create can mean a big boost to the whole company."

 

"I have to look for methods of doing business in a whole new way. Our customers want more than a one size fits all solution. It's up to me to make that happen."

 


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