Wisconsin's Public Liberal Arts College

Family Guide


Career Services

Family Guide

Parents and Friends, you are a major influence in the career decisions your student makes over the next few years.  Here are ways you can help encourage and guide their planning process. Follow the tabs to learn the roles students, parents, friends, and Career Services take when developing a student's career goals.

First Year


Student's Role

  • Orient yourself to the University
  • Keep options open as you explore the academic world
  • Develop excellent study skills for college
  • Become involved in a student activity or club to start building an experience base to apply towards a career
  • Establish relationships with your academic advisor and faculty
  • Map out coursework for the time you plan on being at the University
  • Investigate part-time jobs and internships: internships can pay more than some jobs and may look better on a resume
  • For summer: obtain a summer job, volunteer experience, or an internship

Parent’s Role

  • Support your student in making grades a top priority
  • Encourage your student to meet with each of his/her professors and academic advisor at least once during each semester to address questions or concerns
  • Talk with your student about the different campus clubs or activities that might match his/her interests or career goals
  • Encourage your student to use Jacket Jobs to find a part-time job/internship during the semester
  • Encourage your student to plan early to find a summer job, volunteer experience, or internship that matches his/her career interests
  • Promote Career Services Job Fairs and events  

Career Services Role

  • The UW-Superior Career Services Office offers 2 regional job fairs to help students connect with the world of work
  • Assist students in finding a part-time job through the use of Jacket Jobs
  • Assist students in finding a summer job or volunteer experience through the use of Jacket Jobs and the Career Services Office

Sophomore Year

Student's Role

  • Explore your interests, values, and skills and how they relate to the world of work
  • Learn about occupations and majors to make tentative career choices
  • Set short-term goals to explore realistic career alternatives
  • Research different career options and their feasibility
  • Start assessing what types of skills and knowledge you possess (or need) to succeed in your chosen career path
  • Conduct informational interviews with professionals who work in the career field you are interested in exploring
  • Become familiar with local area companies
  • Learn to write a resume and a cover letter effectively
  • Learn and practice effective interviewing skills Investigate opportunities for internships and other career-related experiences through campus interviewing, resume referral, Jacket Jobs and the Web
  • Summer: Obtain an internship or career-related experience in order to "check out" potential career choices

Parent’s Role

  • If your student is undecided about career choice, encourage him/her to see a career counselor in Career Services
  • Talk with your student about the different career and major choices he/she is considering
  • Listen to your student talk about what makes each choice interesting and share your experiences
  • Encourage your student to follow his/her dreams and make the choices that “fit”
  • Help your student come up with a list of your friends and relatives that may work in a field of interest to him/her so they can contact them for informational interviews
  • Encourage your student to obtain pertinent career-related experiences over the summer that can further his/her career goals

Career Services Role

  • Offer self-exploration assistance through the use of the Strong Interest Inventory and other career assessments to assist with finding a major
  • Offer career counseling to help pinpoint some issues that may be impeding students in making an informed career or degree choice
  • Teach goal setting and decision making skills
  • Connect students with information about majors
  • Assist students in assessing their skills and knowledge as they relate to the world of work
  • Work with students to fine-tune their interviewing skills and give them a place to practice in a consequence free environment
  • Teach students how to conduct informational interviews and contact professionals in the field they show an interest in learning more about
  • Familiarize students with company/organizational information contained within Career Services, local libraries, Jacket Jobs and on the Web
  • Offer interviewing skills and resume writing workshops as well as individual assistance where needed
  • Maintain internship and other career related opportunities through on-campus recruiting, career fairs, and Jacket Jobs
  • Give students the tools to search for career-related experiences
  • Provide opportunities for students to meet with representatives of local area companies and begin networking

Junior Year

Student's Role

  • Pursue major coursework
  • Develop a file of career-related projects and potential networking contacts
  • Keep an eye out for individuals to use as a reference during your job search
  • Develop marketable skills in addition to a degree
  • Attend campus career workshops and fall and spring career fairs
  • Hone your resume writing and interviewing skills
  • Reassess career goals including alternative career plans
  • Begin to "network" through informational interviews with professionals in your chosen career field
  • Summer: Obtain an internship or career-related experience to increase/gain professional skills

Parent’s Role

  • Encourage your student to take classes and get involved in activities that will enhance his/her academics and marketability
  • Talk with your student about career goals and any alternative plans he/she might be making
  • Encourage the decision making processes whenever possible
  • Encourage your student to attend career workshops and fall and spring career fairs as well as any other career events on campus that may match his/her interests
  • Provide "networking" contacts for your student but allow him/her to make the contact
  • Encourage your student to obtain career-related experiences that matches his/her career goals

Career Services Role

  • Assist students to assess their marketable skills, including what type of enhancements to their degree that would be of benefit
  • Host career workshops, fall and spring career fairs and On-Campus Recruiting
  • Offer practice interviews where students are given proven methods for increasing their chances at landing a job
  • Resume and cover letter critiques that apply up-to-date research on current market trends in resumes
  • Provide individual counseling to assist in assessment of career goals
  • Assist students in choosing and applying for career-related experiences to bolster their resumes
  • Maintain career-related opportunities through practice interviews, resume reviews, cover letter reviews, and Jacket Jobs

Senior Year

Student's Role

  • Dedicate time to your job search. It takes more time than many think
  • Research company information at Career Services, in the library and on the Web
  • Attend career workshops, On-Campus Recruiting, fall and spring career fairs and any other career events available
  • Discuss career opportunities and plans with faculty, advisers, counselors and trusted professionals in your field of interest
  • Select faculty and administrators to act as references; discuss interests, skills, and personal strengths as related to the positions being sought
  • Ask select faculty and administrators to act as references and send them a copy of your resume
  • Complete file of career related projects or activities to use as examples during an interview
  • Partake in a practice interview
  • Plan out and conduct your self-directed job search, concentrating on networking and applying for positions listed on Jacket Jobs
  • Take advantage of any opportunity to interview with employers during On- Campus Recruiting
  • Research graduate/professional schools to see if it is important to your goals
  • Take graduate school admissions test, if necessary
  • Apply to graduate school if it furthers your career goals
  • Complete senior projects needed to graduate
  • Stay organized; keep a log of contacts, interviews, and follow-up activities

Parent’s Role

  • Ask your student how you can help him/her achieve identified career goals and then assist him/her in the manner suggested
  • Be available and open to listen to the fears and uncertainties your student is expressing; validate fears but encourage him/her to continue on towards achieving goals
  • Offer to talk with your student about career goals and how his/her interests and skills relate to them; listen more than you talk
  • Offer to assist in putting together a list of names of useful people for your student to "network" with and encourage him/her to make the contact
  • Encourage your student to attend career fairs on campus that may match his/her career interests
  • Encourage your student to get assistance with his/her job search and participate in On-Campus Recruiting
  • Talk with your student about his/her graduate or professional school plans
  • Listen, be patient, and don’t worry

Career Services Role

  • Assist students in finding company and organizational information
  • Host career workshops, fall and spring career fairs and On-Campus Recruiting
  • Fine-tune students’ job search materials
  • Assist students in selecting references for job searching and applying to graduate school
  • Offer job search strategies assistance and individual job search assistance
  • Troubleshoot job search process if required
  • Provide contact with companies that are hiring through On-Campus Recruiting
  • Maintain listings of permanent positions through Jacket Jobs

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