Course Descriptions for Graduate Courses 2012-2014 Catalog - UW-Superior

2012-2014 Catalog

2012-2014 Graduate Course Descriptions

Graduate Course Descriptions

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ANTH - AnthropologyTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ANTH 699Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Supervised independent study and/or research in Anthropology. Prior contract with instructor is required.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101 and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
ART - ArtTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ART 520Studies in American Art3.00
American art of the Colonial, 19th or 20th Century period including sculpture, architecture and painting.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 521Mediterranean3.00
Architecture, sculpture, craft, and painting of the Mediterranean and Near East cultures to include any one or combination of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome or early Christian/Byzantine.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 523Medieval Art3.00
a) Early Christian and Byzantine; b) Medieval; c) Romanesque; d) Gothic: A detailed investigation of the art of the Middle Ages.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 524Visual Arts in Non-Western Societies3.00
Study of visual arts in non-western societies including North American Indian/Native American; Mesoamerican; Oceania/Pacific Islands, Asian, and African cultures.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 525Renaissance Art3.00
Italian or Northern European architecture, sculpture and painting from 1250 to 1600.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 526Baroque Art to Romanticism3.00
The Arts in Italy and Northern Europe between 1550 and 1850.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 527Modern Art4.00
Nineteenth Century, 20th Century, Contemporary or Post-Modern art and architecture and the forces which influenced the period.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 529Women in Art3.00
Women's expression in painting and sculpture, primarily of the 19th and 20th Centuries.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 536Contemporary Movements in the Visual Arts3.00
Record movements in paining, sculpture and architecture, with emphasis on the United States and Canada.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 542Photography History, Theory and Criticism3.00
Survey of the aesthetic and fundamental technical history of photography as a vital means of artistic expression and communication in North America and Western Europe from 1827 to 1940.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 550Psychology of Art3.00
Art as a fundamental human activity on an individual and societal level. Studies theories of creativity and issues of cultural and social diversity as applicable to art therapy.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Art Therapy Graduate or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
ART 602Art Therapy Seminar3.00
Study of the art of clients with different disabilities and psychopathologies. Investigation into methods of inducing visual expression with different clients will be emphasized. The current DSM will be used in conjunction with defining client disabilities and pathologies.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ART 605Drawing3.00
Advanced problems in drawing. Repeatable up to nine credits.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 610Painting3.00
Individual concepts and creative skills in the use of oils, watercolors, and/or related media. Discussions and critiques supplement studio experiences. Repeatable up to nine credits.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 611Collage3.00
Advanced studies in collage. Creating artworks with resources from natural, digital, and manufactured world. Emphasis on the development of responsive creativity.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 615Ecopsychology, Art and Meditation3.00
Ecopsychology is an emerging field that studies the relationship between people and nature. It has far-reaching implications in sustainability, politics, and the arts on a personal and group level. Through art and meditation a deep understanding of the principles and practices of ecopsychology will be explored. Repeatable up to nine credits.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 619Multi-Modal Art Therapy3.00
An exploration of Multi-Modal healing techniques including Drama, Music, Poetry, and Play Therapy and their application in Art Therapy will be studied scholastically and experientially. Guest speakers on the topics presented as well as varied techniques as applicable to Art Therapy will be introduced.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Art Therapy Graduate or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
ART 630Readings in Art History3.00
Guided individual research on an approved topic. Repeatable up to 12 credits. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 635Research in Art3.00
Topic: Art Education. Students plan and conduct an independent research project in art education. Research may be either basic or applied in nature. Results of the study will be reported in the style and form required for publication. Prerequisite: Minimum of 20 undergraduate credits in art and permission of the instructor. Topic: Art Therapy - Research into specific areas and elective topics in art therapy. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
ART 640Printmaking3.00
Advanced problems in printmaking. Topics: etching (spring semester), woodcut (fall semester). Repeatable up to nine credits
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 641Photography3.00
Advanced and graduate studio courses (respectively) concerned with defining a specific direction with a body of work with an emphasis on resolution. Repeatable up to nine credits
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 645Expressive Arts For Change3.00
Experiential studio course exploring the expressive arts process in depth through multiple arts media and techniques. Use the expressive arts as an essential tool for social change and personal transformation to contribute to positive change. Repeatable up to nine credits.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 660Sculpture3.00
Students work on more specialized problems of their own design in consultation with the instructor. Repeatable up to nine credits
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 670Ceramics0.00
An advanced course that critically examines ceramic processes and aesthetic issues through extended creative projects developed in consultation with the instructor. Emphasis on producing a professional, coherent portfolio and supporting visual artists' materials. Repeatable up to nine credits.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 675Metalwork3.00
Advanced techniques and processes. Repeatable up to nine credits
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 679Fibers3.00
Topic: Loom Weaving - Interlocking fibers via loom mechanisms; includes experience with fabric structure, fiber characteristics and the effective use of color. Topic: Off-Loom Fibers - Primary structures through a variety of manipulation techniques; may include primitive forms of weaving, felting, basketry and dyeing. Emphasis on expression. Repeatable up to nine credits.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 683Art Therapy Fundamentals3.00
Survey of the origins, history, and theoretical objectives and trends in art therapy. Covers ethical, legal issues, and standards of good practice.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 684The Development of Creative Functioning3.00
Study of the creative individual; research findings on creativity; techniques for promoting creativity thinking and problem-solving in educational, clinical and business environments.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 685Art Therapy Techniques3.00
Theoretical approaches and techniques used in art therapy. Students learn to develop and apply art therapy assessments.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Art Therapy Graduate or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ART 695Advanced Art Studio1.00 - 12.00
Open only to advanced Art students who wish to pursue an individual art problem in any medium of their choosing. The student must take the responsibility of choosing a problem, outlining a plan of study to be submitted to the instructor at registration. The student works informally in co-operation with the instructor, who guides and evaluates in relation to the objective set forth. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Summer Terms
ART 697Art Field Study1.00 - 3.00
By special arrangement with a department faculty member the student may enroll in an independent study project which may entail travel or the use of resources to be found in the immediate region. Documentation will be required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 698Practicum1.00 - 7.00
Supervised experience providing practical application in specific disciplines. Integration of the competencies of the individualized focus in contract form. Topics: Art Education, Art Therapy, Expressive Ecopsychology, Gallery. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 702Art Therapy Seminar3.00
Investigation into methods of inducing visual expression with different treatment settings. The current DSM will be used in conjunction with defining client disabilities and pathologies.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Art Therapy Graduate or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ART 704Issues in Visual Arts3.00
Advanced study of theoretical frameworks, concepts, contents, and contexts of visual arts. Topic will vary from the spirituality and the sacred in art, psychology and philosophy of art, primitivism in contemporary/modern art, cultural politics in art, feminism in art, science and technology in art, among others.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 705Drawing3.00
Individual development emphasized. Repeatable up to nine credits
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 710Painting3.00
Studio course designed to give the student the opportunity to develop theories and practices on a personal basis relative to the art of painting. Repeatable up to nine credits.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 711Collage3.00
Advanced studies in collage. Creating artworks with resources from natural, digital, and manufactured world. Emphasis on the development of responsive creativity.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 715Ecopsychology Art and Meditation3.00
Ecopsychology is an emerging field that studies the relationship between people and nature. It has far reaching implications in sustainability, politics, and the arts on a personal and group level. Through art and meditation a deep understanding of the principles and practices of ecopsychology will be explored.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 719Multi-Modal Art Therapy3.00
An exploration of Multi-Modal healing techniques and their application in Art Therapy, Drama, Music, Poetry, and Play Therapy will be studied scholastically and experientially. Professionals in the field as well as varied techniques will be introduced.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Art Therapy Graduate or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
ART 720Studies in American Art3.00
American art of the Colonial, 19th or 20th Century period including sculpture, architecture and painting.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 721Mediterranean3.00
Architecture, sculpture, craft, and painting of the Mediterranean and Near East cultures to include any one or combination of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome or early Christian/Byzantine.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 723Medieval Art3.00
a) Early Christian and Byzantine; b) Medieval; c) Romanesque; d) Gothic: A detailed investigation of the art of the Middle Ages.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 724Visual Arts in Non-Western Societies3.00
Study of visual arts in non-western societies including North American Indian/Native American; Mesoamerican; Oceania/Pacific Islands, Asian, and African cultures.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 725Renaissance Art3.00
Italian or Northern European architecture, sculpture and painting from 1250 to 1600.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 726Baroque Art to Romanticism3.00
The Arts in Italy and Northern Europe between 1550 and 1850.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 727Modern Art3.00
Nineteenth Century, 20th Century, Contemporary or Post-Modern Art and architecture and the forces which influenced the period. Research required.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 729Women in Art3.00
Women's expression in painting and sculpture, primarily of the 19th and 20th Centuries.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 730Readings In Art History3.00
Guided individual research on an approved topic. Repeatable up to nine credits. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 732African Art3.00
Topics: African-American Art and African Art - Alternate every other Fall. A survey of art created by people of African descent. Also discussed are some influences of Islam, Western Europe, and the Caribbean regions. Repeated up to six credits
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
ART 735Research In Art3.00
Topic: Art Therapy: Research into specific areas and elective topics in art therapy. Topic: Art Education - Students plan and execute an art education problem in terms of teaching, supervision and/or curriculum planning in keeping with their local school needs and programs. Students carry on an independent research study culminating in the research report written in style and form ready for publication.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 736Contemporary Movements in the Visual Arts3.00
Record movements in paining, sculpture and architecture, with emphasis on the United States and Canada.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 740Printmaking3.00
Advanced printmaking. Topics: Etching (Spring semester) Woodcut (Fall semester) Repeatable up to nine credits.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 741Photography Graduate3.00
Emphasizes concept and process resolution by defining a specific direction through a cohesive body of photographs. Students have the option of working in film or digital.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of Art 641 or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 745Expressive Arts For Change3.00
Experiential studio course exploring the expressive arts process in depth through multiple arts media and techniques. Use the expressive arts as a tool for social change and personal transformation to contribute to positive change. Repeatable up to nine credits.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 750Psychology of Art3.00
Art as a fundamental human activity on an individual and societal level. Studies theories of creativity and issues of cultural and social diversity as applicable to art therapy.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Art Therapy Graduate or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
ART 760Sculpture3.00
Advanced sculpture. Individual development emphasized. Prerequisite: ART 260,360,460,660. Repeatable up to nine credits.
Prerequisites:
Instructor consent and completion of ART 260, 360, 460, and 660 are prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 770Ceramics3.00
Individualized studio problems in ceramics. Work at this level is expected to be specialized and without major technical problems. Repeated up to nine credits. Prerequisite for taking this course is Instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 775Metalwork3.00
Advanced techniques and processes. Repeatable up to nine credits. Prerequisite for taking this course is Instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 779Fiber3.00
Topic: Loom Weaving - Individually designed series of experiences using the loom in interlocking fibers. Problems planned in consultation with instructor. Topic: Off-Loom Fibers - Advanced problems in primary structures should include research of primitive expression, materials and techniques. Repeatable up to nine credits.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 783Art Therapy Fundamentals3.00
Survey of the origins, history, and theoretical objectives and trends in art therapy. Ethical, legal issues and standards of good practice will be covered.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 784Development of Creative Functioning3.00
The study of the creative individual, techniques for problem solving and creative thinking, and ways of promoting creativity with individuals and in group settings. Research required.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Art Therapy Graduate or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 785Art Therapy Techniques3.00
Theoretical approaches and techniques used in art therapy will be studied. Students will also learn to develop and apply art therapy assessments.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Art Therapy Graduate or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 789ART Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ART 790Graduate Art Seminar2.00
Advanced seminar concerned with defining one's evolving philosophical relationship with art and developing a dialogue with art through individual oral or visual presentations and class discussion.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 795Independent Study1.00 - 5.00
Graduate art students work independently under guidance of an instructor. Students submit a proposal of study during the first week of the course. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 797Art Field Study1.00 - 3.00
By special arrangement and permission of the department, a student may enroll for the off-campus study of a problem in art. Documentation required. Prerequisite for taking this course is Instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 798Practicum1.00 - 7.00
Supervised experience providing practical application in specific disciplines. Integration of the competencies of the individualized focus in contract form. Topics: Art Education, Art Therapy, Expressive Ecopsychology, Gallery. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 799Graduate Terminal Project1.00 - 3.00
Successful completion of thesis or M.A. exhibition with supporting paper. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
ARTED - Art EducationTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ARTED 681Art for Special Education3.00
Exploration of art concepts, media, and processes with adaptation for the mainstreamed student with special educational needs. A study of characteristics of students with behavior and/or learning disorders, cognitive delay, physical handicap, and gifted and talented.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ARTED 682Art Education for the Gifted and Talented3.00
Study of current guidelines, trends, and program options that address the special educational needs of gifted and talented students. Areas of emphasis include: student characteristics, art work characteristics, identification procedures, and curriculum models. Prerequisite: Minimum of 20 undergraduate credits in Art and permission of the instructor. By arrangement.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ARTED 781Art for Special Education3.00
Exploration of art concepts, media, and processes with adaptations for the mainstreamed student with special educational needs. A study of characteristics of students with behavior and/or learning disorders, cognitive delay, physical handicap, and gifted and talented.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ARTED 782Art Education for the Gifted and Talented3.00
Study of current guidelines, trends, and program options that address the special educational needs of gifted and talented students. Areas of emphasis include: student characteristics, artwork characteristics, identification procedures, and curriculum models. Prerequisite: Minimum of 20 undergraduate credits in art and permission of the instructor. By arrangement.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
BIOL - BiologyTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
BIOL 681Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in biology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Instructor permission to enroll in this course.
 
COAC - CoachingTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
COAC 689Coach Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
COMM - Communicating ArtsTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
COMM 501Selected Topics in Film and Television3.00
Examination of one of the major cycles, movements, nationalities, eras, or genres of motion picture and/or television production. Several feature films and/or television programs exemplifying historically and critically important aspects of the topic will be shown. Different topics are repeatable.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed COMM104.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
COMM 520Selected News Writing3.00
Students learn to identify a topic and focus an angle, and write feature stories, editorials and commentary. The class works together to analyze strengths and weaknesses of each student's work.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COMM 530Advanced News Gathering and Report3.00
This course expands the student's understanding of journalism; its function in a democracy, techniques of investigation, documentary and series reporting; and transition into the electronics and entrepreneurial delivery of news. Students develop their own news blogs and cover local issues through them, and work in groups to create a final feature project (radio, video, print or online).
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 532Communication in Conflict3.00
Theoretical and applied exploration and analysis of communication in diverse conflict contexts.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 548Screenwriting3.00
Theory and extensive practice in narrative writing for television and film. Includes study and application of relevant media writing formats.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
COMM 558Broadcast Journalism3.00
Review of the methods and philosophies of news gathering, writing, and reporting for the electronic media. Frequent practical exercises to sharpen the student's writing and reporting abilities.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisites for taking this course is having completed COMM 170 and 203.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 561Narrative Video Production3.00
Project-intensive course in which students produce, direct, and edit fictional narrative videos. A variety of theories, techniques, and methods will be studied and applied to the student productions.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 562Documentary Video Production3.00
Project intensive course in which students produce, direct, and edit documentary videos. A variety of theories, techniques, and methods will be studied and applied to the student productions.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
COMM 565Theatre Direction I3.00
Theory and practice of a play production from the viewpoint of the director. Emphasis on directoral choices. Directed laboratory scene work required.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
COMM 566Theatre Direction II3.00
Continued study and practice of stage directing culminating in a supervised production experience.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
COMM 568Criticism Of Film and Television3.00
Advanced study of seminal aesthetic and critical theories for the visual media. Students learn and apply critical frameworks in the analysis of film and television.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 576Group Communication Processes3.00
Exploration of communication processes within the context of the small group with emphasis on interpersonal relations, group dynamics, leadership and participant functions. An experiential/theoretical course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 577Special Topics In Theatre3.00
Examination of special topics in the areas of theatre. Topics vary depending on current student interest and needs to the current season offering. Repeatable with different sections.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 588Elements Of Design for Theatre3.00
Designing for the theatrical arts. Emphasis of the aspects of lighting, sound, costuming and scenery to include sketchbooks, drafting, renderings and model making.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 589Comm Arts Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
COMM 592Leadership Training for Theatre2.00
Practical experience in serving in leadership positions in Theatre. Section numbers indicate the particular leadership area. Consult with your proposed instructor for the appropriate section number. Contract prior to registration. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 655Theorizing Media Culture3.00
Traces the development throughout the 20th century and into the 21st century of different models and theoretical frameworks for understanding mediated communication. The course is reading-intensive and emphasizes the development skills for analyzing, critiquing, and theorizing contemporary media.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 667Advanced Intercultural Comm3.00
Advanced analysis of the communication dimensions involved in enhancing intercultural interactions. Focus is on identity and communication and their relationship to each other in a diverse world.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Summer Terms
COMM 677Media Law3.00
Examines the development over the past two centuries of key concepts, principles, and legal precedents affecting media in the United States. Students also scrutinize the changes wrought by newer communication technologies and changing sociocultural practices. Emphasizes the building of skills in critical media literacy.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COMM 698Advanced Independent Study1.00 - 6.00
Individual investigation and/or production by advanced students in Communication, Media, or Theatre to include a study of related literature and formal reports or production. Instructor consent and contract prior to enrollment. Repeatable up to six credits. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 701Communication Theory3.00
In-depth study of theoretical traditions and specific theories in Communicating Arts, including Media Communication, and Theatre.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COMM 702Communication Research3.00
Introduction to historical, critical, creative, and ethnographic research in Communicating Arts.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 708Media Ethics and Criticism3.00
Using examples from historical cases and current issues, students analyze the practices of major media organizations and other media makers through an ethical lens. Students also consider how ethical standards and institutional norms, government and corporate interests, and ideologies (e.g., of the free press and of race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class) influence media decision-making. this course emphasizes skills in critical media analysis.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 711Graduate Practicum1.00 - 3.00
Graduate-level research study and/or practice in Communication, Theatre, Radio, Video Production, or Journalism. A multiple-section course allowing a high degree of specialization. Repeatable. Project designed in consultation with instructor and academic advisor. Contract prior to enrollment.. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 715Selected Topics in Theatre History3.00
Individualized study of a major period in the history of theatre. Emphasis on the relationship of the physical theatre to the social history of the period in review. Instructor Consent required. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
COMM 721Advanced Design for Theatre3.00
Advanced principles of design as related to technical, historic, and contemporary theatre production. Instructor consent required. Repeatable. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
COMM 775Internship3.00 - 9.00
Supervised work in professional communication industries and settings. May include collateral reading, reports, and conferences with faculty supervisor. Major emphasis in the area of the internship, must have a signed Affiliation Agreement with organization with which you are interning on file in Communicating Arts Office, contract prior to registration and consent of the Communicating Arts Department chair. The application for internship including written consent from the external agency (Affiliation Agreement) must be submitted to the department chair 30 days prior to enrollment. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 780Thesis3.00 - 6.00
Individual thesis research in Communication, Media, or Theatre. An outline of the proposed thesis must be approved by the advisor and the Communicating Arts Department Chair, and a contract completed before registration. Arranged.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed COMM 701 and COMM 702.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 789Comm Arts Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
COMM 795Special Topics Seminar3.00
This department periodically offers specially designed seminars on any number of diverse topics within Communicating Arts.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
COMM 798Independent Study3.00 - 6.00
Graduate-level independent investigation and/or production in Communication, Media or Theatre. Project designed in consultation with the instructor and a contract prior to enrollment. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 799Intern Teaching in Communication3.00
Student assists and works with a graduate faculty member in teaching a lower-division, undergraduate Communicating Arts course. Practical work in structuring and presenting the consent of one or more selected units of course under the supervision of the instructor of record. Repeatable. Instructor and department chair consent and a contract prior to registration. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
COUN - Guidance & Counselor EducationTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
COUN 681Seminars in Counselor Education0.50 - 3.00
Selected topics and problems in counselor education. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or problem is studied each time.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
COUN 702Counseling Theories3.00
Analysis of counseling theories and practices. Examines several of the major theories -- historic and current -- of counseling. Serves as an introduction to the field of counseling and to illustrate the diversity of theoretical approaches which exist. Students develop a preliminary theoretical philosophy of counseling. One of three courses -- COUN 702, 704, 706 -- that serve as a foundation to the profession and the program.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COUN 704Introduction to Counseling3.00
Overview of the counseling profession and its areas of specialization, training, and concern. Examines program development and administration, relevant laws and applications, as well as one's professional identity as a counseling professional. One of three courses -- COUN 702, 704, 712 -- that serve as a foundation to the profession and program.
COUN 706Pre-practicum3.00
Introduces counseling skill development, emphasizing the skills essential in the interview and rapport-building process. Students develop a thorough understanding of the counseling process as well as the role and function of the counselor. Students also develop a self-awareness so the counselor-client relationship is therapeutic and so the counselor sets and maintains appropriate professional boundaries. Examines ethical and legal considerations inherent in the counseling process.
Prerequisites:
COUN 702, 704, and 712 are prerequisites for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COUN 708Organization and Administration of School Guidance and Other Pupil Services3.00
Overview of essential school counseling services and the role and function of the school counselor with emphasis on developing, and managing, and evaluating a comprehensive counseling program within the realms of an entire school. Covers the seven pupil services content standards and additional information pertaining to the other members of the pupil service team with whom the counselor works. Integrates special education, technology, legal and ethical issues.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
COUN 712Family Counseling3.00
Introduction to family systems theory and family therapy techniques. Students develop an understanding of the current epistemological base of family system's theory, major contributors, and specifically review structural, strategic, behavioral and communications approaches to family counseling. Students review the organization and dynamics of their own families, coming to understand how their families impact their world perceptions and everyday behavior.
Typically Offered:
Other, Refer to Catalog
COUN 714Family Group Systems3.00
Integrates, at the next level of professional competence, the family theory and family counseling techniques presented in COUN 712 Family Counseling. Assumes students are seeking skill development that will assist in meeting "family counselor" professional certification standards, (state and/or national certifications). Further assumes students have explored their own family issues and will continue to do so through this course, as the course is in part experiential. Students closely review the isomorphic processes reflected within their own familial systems that are reflected in their counseling approach and theory preferences. Students assume the professional functions of a family counselor through current literature, development of professional vita, and exploration of certification. At the successful conclusion of this course, students are assumed to be ready to provide supervised family counseling service.
Prerequisites:
COUN 712 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
COUN 716Couple and Marital Counseling3.00
While the concept of family seems to be defined and redefined through generational context, the need of the individual to be "affiliated" continues to highlight the dyadic relationship's importance to the emotional and social survival of the individual. This course explores intimate dyadic relationships and their importance to the concept of family, family development, and society. Reviews select couple and family dynamics such as basic assumptions of human intimacy (variations), marriage (dissolution and remarriage), mate selection, communications, human sexuality, family crisis, parenting, and aging. Through lectures, experiential exercises, reading, and class discussion, family theory and techniques are integrated and provide conceptualizations toward therapeutic intervention.
Prerequisites:
COUN 712 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
COUN 718Family Crisis Intervention3.00
Designed to continue the student's counseling skill development in family systems counseling by focusing on the problem areas of family crises and "pre- and post-divorce dispute." Students are provided with a theoretical base to model crisis and dispute resolution techniques and to therapeutically intervene.
Prerequisites:
COUN 712 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Other, Refer to Catalog
COUN 720Counseling Children3.00
Focuses on how the counselor can facilitate self-expression in the counseling context with clients, primarily children, who may have difficulty expressing themselves verbally. Developmental theories and issues that shape children's adjustment to school and to their community form the foundations of the course. Basic solution-oriented brief counseling and consultative techniques are integrated for work with parents and teachers.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
COUN 722Counseling Adolescents3.00
Adolescents represent a clientele in transition. This course examines key aspects in their development (biological, cognitive, emotional, and social) and their relationships in the various contexts that influence behaviors and attitudes. Common issues of adolescence as well as various interventions are covered from a developmental context. Students learn how to facilitate client self-expression primarily through brief therapeutic techniques and how to consult with supervising adults. While the focus is on normal development, course also touches on at-risk/problematic behavior and thoughts.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COUN 724Behavior Modification3.00
Principles of learning theory and behavior management techniques. Students learn how to apply these principles and techniques to aid individuals in the change process. Students plan, implement, and evaluate a self-change project which will demonstrate their understanding of the theory and techniques of behavioral self-management.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COUN 726Developmental Guidance and Counseling3.00
Developing the knowledge, skills, and expertise necessary to teach developmental lessons in the classroom that are appropriate to all ages. Covers classroom management. Students, using the ASCA and Wisconsin Developmental Models, develop a set of lessons (perhaps based on monthly themes) specific to the ages of the children they intend to counsel. Emerging problems in the schools, such as bullying, sexual harassment, and abuse are covered. Class covers the 10 WDPI Teacher and Pupil Services Standards.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COUN 728Career Counseling3.00
Provides an understanding of theories of vocational choice and vocational development. Students learn methods of evaluating, promoting, and enhancing, vocational development in individuals from a diversity of backgrounds. They examine ethical and legal considerations inherent in the career counseling process. Also emphasizes student application of traditional and technology based career assessment techniques. Students participate in experiential activities that focus on the career development of themselves and others.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
COUN 730Human Growth and Development3.00
Surveys the key physical, cognitive, and social-emotional milestones across the life-span, how these interact with an individual's adaptation ability, and the implications for mental health professionals. Focuses on 1) the key concepts of the major theories of development; 2) examination of normal developmental stages across the life-span and the influence of social forces differences in development based on sex/gender, age, class, race, ability, and cultural background; psychosocial adaptation in the school/work, family, and peer systems; and implications for mental health and school counseling professionals. Includes legal and ethical issues and strategies for interventions to enhance development.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COUN 734Chemical Dependency and the Family3.00
Assessment and intervention techniques with individuals and families in which one or more other family members is chemically dependent. Specific techniques to intervene with spouses of alcoholics, children of alcoholics (minor children and/or adults) and extended family members are included. Also reviews the impact of other addictive behaviors on the family.
Typically Offered:
Other, Refer to Catalog
COUN 738Multi-Cultural Counseling3.00
Students conduct an in-depth self-analysis regarding the manner in which counselor and client values, perceptions, attitudes, acculturative experiences, and communication styles impact the counseling process. Students are encouraged to conduct an in-depth cultural self-analysis regarding the issues they have inherited from their own culture as it relates to helping multicultural clients. Furthermore, students learn theories, skills, and cross cultural counseling strategies necessary in working with ethnically and culturally diverse clients. The cross-cultural counseling strategies include both group and individual techniques. Students examine any ethical and legal considerations inherent in the counseling process in regards to clients from a diversity of backgrounds. Designed for counselors already working in the field, and current graduate counseling students. Also helpful for any professional who regularly deals with multicultural individuals.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
COUN 740Counseling and Human Sexuality3.00
Provides counselors with a contemporary understanding of human sexuality and gender issues, myths, and problems (physical/biological, emotional, social, cultural) for people (married and not) considering, engaging in, and/or "recovering" from sexual relationships. Includes interventions and treatment approaches. While the course is a requirement for Marriage and the Family Therapist Licensure, it is open to all interested counseling students.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
COUN 742Psychopathology3.00
Study of abnormal behavior, including classification of various disorders, descriptions of causal factors, methods of assessment, prevention and treatment. Includes examining the current diagnostic system, DSM-IV TR. Students develop an awareness of the limitations of the current diagnostic system along with multicultural and ethical considerations. Also teaches students how to integrate results from psychological assessment into the diagnostic process.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COUN 746Ethics in Professional Counseling3.00
Serves the professional needs of Human Service professionals within the area of practice generally referred to as ethics. Assists students in exploring personal values, social expectations/sanctions and professional standards of behavior. Course is in part self-directed and seeks to meet the specific certification and practice needs of the student enrolled. This is a course for students in the last stages of their graduate degree in counseling and/or students who have graduated and are practicing human service professionals.
Typically Offered:
Other, Refer to Catalog
COUN 750Practicum3.00
Assists students in making the transition from theoretical understanding of counseling principles and processes to therapeutic process. Students demonstrate knowledge and skills and refine their knowledge and skills in the following areas: integration of his or her theoretical approach to counseling competence in the basic counseling skills with a focus on individual and group counseling as learned in prior coursework; the ability to identify and assess presenting concerns of clients, diagnose problems, and develop treatment plans; and an ability to present case studies, dialogue, and consult with other professionals regarding his or her effectiveness as a counselor.
Prerequisites:
COUN 706 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COUN 752Group Counseling3.00
Introduction to group counseling including an understanding of group processes, techniques, role of group members and leaders, ethics, and culture, selected group phenomena, processing of group dynamics and therapeutic movement, application of theory and theoretical techniques. The student is required to form and lead a group using a theoretical orientation, and to process the experience through tapes and class discussions.
Prerequisites:
COUN 706 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COUN 756Internship-School (preK-12)2.00 - 4.00
Field-based course providing on-the-job practice in counseling with individuals and groups and in the classroom under the guidance of an on-site supervisor and a university faculty supervisor. Weekly group discussions of cases and sharing of work experiences is at the heart of the campus classes. Particular content areas that enhance professional preparation (such as legal and ethical issues, standards, technology) are covered. Students are expected to share their counseling work weekly for supervision and peer review. Counseling Portfolios are completed and readied for submission. Instructor consent required.
Prerequisites:
Completion of COUN 750 and COUN 752 are prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COUN 758Internship-Community Counseling2.00 - 4.00
Experiential course that integrates counseling theory into practical application under supervision. Off-campus professional work sites provide students practical experience while weekly class sessions provide support/supervision for work-site activities. Students' skill integration will be monitored and modified through class discussion, written assignments, class exercises and one-to-one supervision with instructor. This advanced course seeks to finalize professional readiness. Successful completion is dependent on the assumption of the professional functions and obligations of a human service provider. Each internship is an individual placement that is developed related to the professional needs of the student, the needs of the internship site and the coordination by the internship instructor. Instructor consent required.
Prerequisites:
Completion of COUN 750 and COUN 752 are prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COUN 760Introduction to Assessment3.00
Addresses the study of measurement theory and basic statistics needed for understanding assessment. Also focuses on general test construction, appropriate instrument selection with awareness of limitations, multicultural and ethical considerations. Instruments covered focus on psychological and intellectual functioning, and can generally be administered to clients individually or in groups. Students experience the administration, interpretation and reporting of a select sample of assessment tools. Students will be introduced to professional report writing and consequential treatment implications.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
CSCI - Computer ScienceTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
CSCI 681Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
Graduate level investigation of one or more topics of current interest. Not intended for independent study projects. May be repeated, but no more than a total of eight credits may be earned from both MATH 681 and CSCI 681.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
ECED - Early Childhood EducationTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ECED 681Seminars in Early Childhood0.50 - 4.00
Selected topics and problems in the area of early childhood. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or problem is studied each time.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
ECON - EconomicsTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ECON 681Seminar in Economic Issues3.00
In-depth discussion of current economic issues. While the focus will be on the economic aspects, social as well as political elements will be included. Various policy options will be developed, discussed, and analyzed.
 
EDAD - Educational AdministrationTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
EDAD 689EDAD Elective1.00 - 3.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
EDAD 700Administrative Leadership3.00
Study of selected theories and research relating to individual and group behaviors in K-12 educational organizations with emphasis on leadership characteristics of educational administrators, including participatory management, long-range strategic planning and change-agent processes. Particular emphasis given to human relations skills as well as oral and written communication skills needed by public school leaders.
EDAD 701The Director of Instruction3.00
A study of the various factors which will provide the student with foundations of research, theory, and best practices in instructional leadership and school.
EDAD 709Directed Study-Administrative Vision of Learning1.00 - 3.00
Directed study by the graduate faculty member to the graduate student in the Administrative Vision of Learning contexts of Educational Administration.
EDAD 710Supervision of Instruction3.00
Study of the function of supervision and evaluation of personnel is designed to assist in the development of programs which will be appropriate to respective school positions and settings. Prepares any member of an organization for the instructional leadership role which requires program planning, evaluation, human relations, and oral and written communication skills.
EDAD 711Curriculum Management and Development K-123.00
Study of the theories and related practices of curriculum development and curriculum organization in American schools. Focuses on methods, materials and strategies in the development, organization and delivery of curriculum in the American K-12 school system. Special emphasis given to development and interpretation of philosophical statements and management. Attention given to utilization of the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction curriculum guides.
EDAD 719Directed Study-Administration of Student Learning and Staff Growth1.00 - 3.00
Directed study by the graduate faculty member to the graduate student in the Administration of Student Learning and Staff Growth contexts of Educational Administration.
EDAD 720School Business Administration3.00
Study of fiscal and material resource management and budgeting of K-12 school systems, including school finance, taxation and contract law with emphasis on the principles that should serve to guide the decision-making process.
EDAD 721The Principalship3.00
Study of the roles and responsibility of the school principal, with emphasis on development of effective instructional leadership skills for the various levels. Deals with the operational tasks of the principalship at the elementary, middle school, and high school levels. Response to contemporary and anticipated problems affecting the elementary and secondary schools are based on tested theory, research and applied practice.
EDAD 728Diversity, Equity and Equality in Schools3.00
Examination of issues related to inequities and inequalities in PK-12 schools. Explores diversity in education from a historical perspective to inform institutional practices regarding race, culture, class, and gender. Considers power dynamics, pedagogy, and ideologies that frame education in a democratic society.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
EDAD 729Directed Study - Administration of Organization, Operations and Resources1.00 - 3.00
Directed study by the graduate faculty member to the graduate student in the Administration of Organization, Operations and Resources contexts of Educational Administration.
EDAD 730Administration and Supervision Of Special Education and Pupil Services3.00
Study of leadership and administrative paradigms of special education and pupil services PK-12. Emphasis on exceptional educational needs programming knowledge base for inclusive administrative leadership. Emphasis on special needs programming knowledge base not the prominent responsibility of regular or special education.
EDAD 739Directed Study - Administration of Diverse Community Interests1.00 - 3.00
Directed study by the graduate faculty member to the graduate student in the Administration of Diverse Community Interests contexts of Educational Administration.
EDAD 741Conflict Resolution and Mediation in K-12 Educational Settings3.00
Study in the understanding of conflict and handling such in the educational setting. Recognition of the role of communication to express conflict and knowledge of resolution techniques, different approaches to negotiations and basic mediation skills for administrators in the K-12 setting. Also explores the phenomena of school violence and means to respond.
EDAD 749Directed Study-Ethical Manner in Educational Administration1.00 - 3.00
Directed study by the graduate faculty member to the graduate student in the ethical manner contexts of Educational Administration.
EDAD 750School Law3.00
Study of the legal framework within which school district employees must operate. Emphasis on laws and sources of laws which affect students and instruction.
EDAD 759Directed Study-Political, Social, and Economic Contexts of Educational Administration1.00 - 3.00
Directed study by the graduate faculty member to the graduate student in the political, social, and economic contexts of educational administration.
EDAD 760Practicum - Director of Special Education and Pupil Services3.00 - 6.00
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience (i.e. 200 Special Education and 120 Pupil Services) and seminar in a grades PK-12 Director of Special Education and Pupil Services setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits and permission of the instructor and EDAD Director of Field Experiences.
EDAD 761Practicum - School Business Administration3.00 - 6.00
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar in a School Business Administration setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits and permission of the instructor and EDAD Director of Field Experiences.
EDAD 762Practicum - PreK-12 Principal3.00 - 6.00
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar in a grades PK-12 Principalship setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits and permission of the instructor and EDAD Director of Field Experiences.
EDAD 763Practicum- PreK-12 Director Of Instruction3.00 - 6.00
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar in a grades PK-12 Director of Instruction setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits and permission of the instructor and EDAD Director of Field Experiences.
EDAD 809Externship-Administrative Vision of Learning1.00 - 3.00
Professional development seminar designed for the practicing school administrator. Emphasis on synthesizing the theory, research and wisdoms of practice of educational administration as related to challenges of practicing school administration to ISLLC Standard #1. Pass-Fail. Enrollment limited to practicing educational administrators. Topics: Administrative Vision of Learning ISLLC #1, Wisconsin State Standard 2.
EDAD 810School Human Resources3.00
Comprehensive study of K-12 instructional and non-instructional personnel planning, information management, recruitment, selection, induction, appraisal, staff development, compensation, continuity of service, collective bargaining, grievance procedures and employee contract administration.
EDAD 819Externship-Administration of Student Learning and Staff Growth1.00 - 3.00
Professional development seminar designed for the practicing school administrator. Emphasis on synthesizing the theory, research and wisdoms of practice of educational administration as related to challenges of practicing school administration to ISLLC Standard #2. Pass-Fail. Enrollment limited to emerging and practicing educational administrators. Topics: Administration of Student Learning and Staff Growth, ISLLC #2, Wisconsin State Standard 3.
EDAD 820The Superintendency3.00
Study of the role and responsibilities of the school superintendent with emphasis on the job competency needed for that leadership role. Topics focus on school improvement through organizational and instructional leadership, assessment and long-range planning, political theory and skills, crisis management, and careful allocation of district resources.
EDAD 821Data Management3.00
Designed for school business personnel pursuing a graduate degree in school business administration. Subject matter will include building files, updating file content, information retrieval and analyses of data associated with school operations.
EDAD 823Education Budget and Accounting3.00
Designed for school business personnel pursuing a graduate degree in school business administration. Focuses on design and application of budgeting and accounting procedures such as coding transactions, designing balance sheets, journals and ledgers using spreadsheet programs.
EDAD 824Educational Program Planning and Evaluation3.00
Advanced-level study of theory and research/practice in association with the organization and operation of public schools. Emphasis on self-analysis of supervisory-administrative style as it relates to the process of supervision involved in performance tasks. Additional focus on program planning and evaluation as related to theory and research/practice in public schools.
EDAD 825Facilities Planning and Utilization3.00
Study of the principles, techniques, and procedures used in planning of educational facilities in K-12 systems. Emphasis on the assessment of needs, involvement in the planning process, development of educational specifications, long-range planning and financing. Risk management and insurance issues are covered within the knowledge base.
EDAD 829Externship-Administration of Organization, Operations and Resources1.00 - 3.00
Professional development seminar designed for the practicing school administrator. Emphasis on synthesizing the theory, research and wisdoms of practice of educational administration as related to challenges of practicing school administration to ISLLC Standard #3. Pass-Fail. Enrollment limited to practicing educational administrators. Topics: ISLLC Standard #3.
EDAD 830Diverse School Community Relations3.00
Study of the administrative responsibility for successful diverse community relations with emphasis on the process, principles, channels, opinion sampling and evolving concepts of communication. A program will be developed including policy, objectives, defining publics, determining media, timing and feedback.
EDAD 832Special Education Law3.00
Study of the legal aspects of educating disabled learners under Section 504, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and No Child Left Behind.
EDAD 839Externship-Administration of Diverse Community Interests1.00 - 3.00
Professional development seminar designed for the practicing school administrator. Emphasis on synthesizing the theory, research and wisdoms of practice of educational administration as related to challenges of practicing school administration to ISLLC Standard #4. Pass-Fail. Enrollment limited to practicing educational administrators. Topics: ISLLC Standard #4.
EDAD 842Professional Ethics for School Administrators3.00
Selected theories and research relating to individual and group behaviors in K-12 educational organizations with emphasis on ethics in public life among professionals, leaders and citizens. Particular emphasis given to political, cultural, business, computer and legal ethics for school leaders.
EDAD 849Externship-Ethical Manner in Educational Administration1.00 - 3.00
Professional development seminar designed for the practicing school administrator. Emphasis on synthesizing the theory, research and wisdoms of practice of educational administration as related to challenges of practicing school administration to ISLLC Standard #5. Pass-Fail. Enrollment limited to practicing educational administrators.
EDAD 850School Finance and Taxation3.00
Study of the theory and practice of school finance at the local, state, and national levels. Emphasis on the economics of education, public finance, and taxation.
EDAD 851Politics Of Education3.00
Examines the governance structure of education. Focuses on the roles of various political factors and special interest groups in the structure and the emergence of new political roles and initiatives in educational administration.
EDAD 854Advanced Budgeting3.00
Theory and practice of advanced budgeting at the local school district level. Emphasis on the meritorious techniques and standards of excellence in budget development and presentation.
EDAD 859Externship-Political, Social and Economic Contexts of Educational Administration1.00 - 3.00
Professional development seminar designed for the practicing school administrator. Emphasis on synthesizing the theory, research and wisdoms of practice of educational administration as related to challenges of practicing school administration to ISLLC Standard #6. Pass-Fail. Enrollment limited to practicing educational administrators.
EDAD 860Internship:PK-12 /Director of Special Education and Pupil Services3.00 - 6.00
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative internship field experience (i.e. 200 Special Education and 120 Pupil Services) and seminar in a grades PK-12 Director of Special Education and Pupil Services setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits and permission of the instructor and EDAD Director of Field Experiences.
EDAD 861Internship:School Business Administration3.00 - 6.00
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar in a School Business Administration setting. Prerequisites: Completion of nine EDAD credits and permission of the instructor and EDAD Director of Field Experiences.
EDAD 862Internship: PK-12 Principal3.00 - 6.00
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar in grades PK-12 Principalship setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits and permission of the instructor and EDAD Director of Field Experiences.
EDAD 863Internship: PK-12 Director of Instruction3.00 - 6.00
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar in a grades PK-12 Director of Instruction setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits semester credits and permission of the instructor and EDAD Director of Field Experiences.
EDAD 864Internship: Superintendency3.00 - 6.00
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative internship in a grades PK-12 superintendency. Prerequisites: Admission to Specialist Degree Program, completion of nine semester credits in Educational Administration beyond the master's program, and permission of the instructor and EDAD Director of Field Experiences.
EDAD 865Statistical Methods Research3.00
Study of statistical design and methodology used in educational research with emphasis given to understandings of appropriate application of statistical tests to educational data. The student studies application of skills developed in basic statistics. Emphasis on the understanding, planning, and execution of statistical studies, descriptive and inferential in approach. Study is conducted with a computer-oriented approach.
EDAD 866Advanced Administrative Analysis3.00
Scholarly work requirement provides the post-graduate student an opportunity to conduct applied scholarship in an educational administration-related project. The research and scholarly paper development is completed under direction of the student's advisor. Guidelines for developing the scholarly work are available from the advisor.
EDAD 867The Ed.S Thesis6.00
Post-graduate degree requirement provides the student an opportunity to conduct a specific school-related research study. Guidelines for developing the proposal and thesis are available from the major advisor of the candidate's committee.
 
ENGED - English EducationTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ENGED 606Advanced Children's Literature3.00
Advanced study of the various types of fiction and nonfiction literatures published for, used with, or selected by children birth to age 12. Emphasis is on using children's literature across the content areas with best practice instruction. Includes the selection, evaluation, appreciation, and use of children's literature and related media. Explores methods to help develop a child's interest in reading and ability to appreciate quality children's literature.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ENGED 618Middle Level Literature3.00
Study of classic and current readings in middle level literature in conjunction with a discussion of the English language arts and literacy skills and concepts typically addressed in grades 5-8. Engaging instructional strategies and assessment tasks will also be emphasized.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGED 663Advanced Study of Literacy Pre K-33.00
Study of the design and implementation of developmentally appropriate curricula and instruction in the language arts that foster the concept of emergent literacy. Focuses on the development of language (both oral and written) and literacy from birth through third grade.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGED 664Advanced Literacy Grades 4-123.00
Study of the design and implementation of language arts curricula and instruction in grades 4-12. Focuses on creating strategic lifelong readers and writers.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGED 665Advanced Content Area Literacy3.00
Study of the use of literacy processes in developing student learning in the content areas. Emphasis is on the integration of learning theory and subject matter knowledge in planning instruction which makes profitable use of test and writing to meet curriculum goals.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ENGED 681Seminars in Education1.00 - 3.00
Selected topics and problems in the area of teacher education. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or problem is studied each time.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
ENGED 701Introduction to Reading Difficulties3.00
Investigation of various aspects of reading difficulties so that special reading teachers and classroom teachers can provide effective reading instruction to readers of a variety of abilities. Strategies for diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties at the elementary and secondary levels will be considered. It is strongly recommended that students in this course enroll in ENGED 702 during the following semester.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGED 702Reading Difficulties Practicum3.00
Practicum in which theories and instructional strategies learned in ENGED 701 are put into practice as the student plans and conducts a program of diagnosis and instruction for elementary-level and secondary-level readers of a variety of abilities. Clinical experiences are designed to develop the student's skill as a diagnostician and teacher of readers of varying abilities.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ENGED 701.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
ENGED 705The K-12 Literacy Program3.00
In-depth study of K-12 literacy programs. Emphasis is on characteristics of effective school literacy programs and methods of planning, developing, and evaluating effective programs.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ENGED 709History of Reading3.00
Exploration of philosophical orientations to literacy instruction with a study of the research base. Students will investigate the history of literacy instruction as well as the most important research studies to affect instruction.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGED 751MSE-Reading Portfolio0.00
Capstone experience of the student's program demonstrating professional growth through reflections on best-practice skills and knowledge gained throughout the coursework. Satisfactory completion of the portfolio as ascertained by the student's program advisor fulfills the state of Wisconsin portfolio requirement for licensure.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ENGED 752Educational Research Project3.00
A literacy research project designed and carried out by a student with the advice and approval of the research advisor. Research advisor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ENGED 781Independent Study2.00 - 4.00
Specially designed study to allow the graduate student to pursue specific areas of need or interest. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
FNS - First Nation StudiesTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FNS 681Counseling the First Nations3.00
Explores counseling theory and application techniques from a First Nations perspective. First Nations world view and linear vs. holistic thinking are principle topics. Group and individual counseling is addressed and practiced. Designed for people in helping professions that deal with First Nations clients. Cross-listed as COUN 481/681.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
FNS 686Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in First Nations Studies selected by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when instructor and/or topics are different. Instructor's approval required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
GEOG - GeographyTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
GEOG 681Special Topics1.00 - 6.00
In-depth study of specialized topics in geography selected by the faculty on the basis of student interest/need. May include workshops, seminars, special issues, etc. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Offered on demand.
 
GEOL - GeologyTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
GEOL 681Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in Geology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. May be repeated when topics are different. Offered on demand. Instructor consent required.
 
HHP - Health and Human PerformanceTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HHP 521Adapted Human Performance (PE)2.00
Activity selection, curricular development and program implementation in teaching exceptional/special needs students. Includes hands-on intervention with exceptional/special needs students.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 540Organization and Administration of Human Performance, Health & Athletics3.00
Techniques, procedures, and principles of organizing and administering human performance, allied health and athletic programs. Emphasizes administrative structure, legal liability, and facilities management.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 541Principles and Theory of Coaching2.00
Analysis of the role of the coach, including the latest information concerning legal liability, administration/organizational responsibilities; various coaching philosophies, diverse personalities of athletes, developing team cohesion, psychology of coaching and teaching techniques.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed HHP 102, HHP 110, and Sophomore standing.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 562Kinesiology2.00
A review of the basic principles of human biomechanics including an emphasis on the musculoskeletal system and its levers which generate torque to facilitate movement.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 563Exercise Physiology3.00
Introductory lecture and laboratory course examining the acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise. The lecture portion covers the sub-cellular and metabolic responses to exercise, followed by the systemic responses (neuromuscular, endocrine, cardiopulmonary) as well as body composition, environmental factors, gender, aging and training principles. The laboratory section allows students to accent the lecture portion with hands-on laboratory experiences.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HHP 282 and HLTH 264 and HLTH 265 or BIOL 270 and BIOL 280.
HHP 566Principles Of Nutrition3.00
Lecture-discussion course covering the basics of human nutrition including the macro and micro nutrients, the role of nutrition in health, weight loss and weight gain practices, erogenic aids and supplements. Also addresses nutrition through the lifespan and global implications. Students required to complete a comprehensive research paper.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HHP 110, HLTH 264, HLTH 265, or BIOL 270, and BIOL 280.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 567Human Sexuality3.00
Covers the biological, sociological, and psychological dimensions of human sexuality. Special emphasis on the education aspects.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 622Adaptive Human Performance (PE) Fieldwork1.00 - 8.00
Work experience with exceptional/special needs individuals. Each credit equals approximately 36 hours of on-the-job experience outside the university.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 624Coaching Students with Special Needs1.00 - 4.00
Theory, principles and practical application of coaching sports for exceptional/special needs students. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course. On demand.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 638Measurement and Evaluation for Human Performance2.00
Introduction to the field of measurement, evaluation and research in human performance. Students are required to complete an independent research project related to their intended profession. Basics of a research proposal, Institutional Review Board and power point presentations are covered.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 656Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology2.00
Psychological and scientific principles as they pertain to understanding participants, sport and exercise environments, group processes, and performance, enhancing health and well-being and facilitating psychological growth and development.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 660Cardiovascular Diagnostics3.00
Introductory survey of theoretical considerations and practical applications of electrocardiography and other cardiac interventions.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 669Pathophysiology of Disease\Prevention and Control3.00
Introductory course of basic pathophysiology including epidemiological basics, infectious and non-infectious diseases, systemic responses, and an in-depth study of the leading causes of death in the United States and Canada (coronary heart disease, cancer, pulmonary disease), as well as common disorders (muscular, skeletal, neurological, gastrointestinal, urological and reproductive systems.) Students are required to complete a comprehensive research paper.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 670Community and Environmental Health3.00
Survey of health and environmental issues as they relate to the global community. The organizations, resources and personnel involved in promotion and maintenance of the health of a community. Also examines health education theories as they relate to creating a professional health promotion plan.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HHP 102, HHP 110, and Junior class standing.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 671Senior Seminar: Community Health Promotion3.00
Development, implementation, and administration of community health promotion programs.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 690Independent Study1.00 - 6.00
Intensive investigation of various phases, trends and/or programs in health or human performance. Each student presents a thorough paper on a selected phase, trend or problem in human performance.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior class standing, 3.0 grade point average, and consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 691Fieldwork1.00 - 12.00
Varied opportunities to work in field settings. Each credit equals approximately 36 hours of on-the-job experience outside the university. Normally open to juniors and seniors. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 692Experiential Learning1.00 - 12.00
Credit for certain non-classroom experiences on campus. Normally open to juniors and seniors. Credit for experience is normally sought prior to its occurrence. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 694Workshop1.00 - 8.00
Short-term, activity/health oriented course in a specialized area. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 695Current Topics Seminar1.00 - 12.00
Advanced seminar on major contemporary developments in the area of human performance and athletics.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 696Internship10.00 - 20.00
On-the-job experience with community agencies to provide students with realistic opportunities to apply their skills to practical problems. A student must work at a site a minimum of 450 hours to receive internship credit. Field Experiences Director's consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 700Research Seminar3.00
Advanced seminar to instruct students on the procedures and sources for obtaining the latest information in the field and to provide a forum for discussion of advances in the field. Emphasis on library research, bibliographic data retrieval, writing a seminar paper, and oral presentation of the seminar paper.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 701Legal Liability in Human Performance and Athletics3.00
Case study approach to liabilities that may be encountered by schools and community agencies in their human performance, athletic, intramural and recreational programs. Interpretation of legal precedents and their implications for the organization and management of sports, including, equipment, facilities, supervision, transportation, and handling of injuries.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 702Administration of Athletics3.00
Independent study of the administrative techniques, policies and procedures necessary to successfully administer athletic programs, including current administrative problems.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 703Supervision of Human Performance3.00
History, philosophy, principles and techniques of supervising human performance in the elementary and secondary schools. Professional qualities and preparation of supervisors of student teachers in human performance will also be included.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 704Human Performance Curriculum Development3.00
Current types of instructional programs in elementary, middle and senior high schools. Emphasizes techniques of planning functional human performance curricula considering facilities and staff.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
HIST - HistoryTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HIST 589History Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 695Special and Student Initiated Seminar1.00 - 3.00
This department offers a specially designed seminar or student-initiated seminar when interest warrants. In certain circumstances this course can be adapted to serve as the capstone experience. For further information see Special or Student-Initiated Seminar in the index of this catalog. Code will depend on topic selected.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 698Study Abroad1.00 - 5.00
Field trips designed to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the instructor. With consent of the department chair and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Code depends on region visited.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 699Independent Study1.00 - 3.00
For advanced students majoring or minoring in History who have shown themselves capable of independent work. Each student is directed by a faculty member chosen by the student. Prerequisite: Approval of the department chair. Code will depend on topic selected.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
HLTH - HealthTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HLTH 568Drugs, Health and Human Behavior3.00
Current, accurate and documented information about drugs and their use and abuse. Attention will be given to understanding drug abuse, family, prevention, intervention, treatment, and drug-specific information.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HLTH 572Consumer Health2.00
Principles of consumerism are discussed and analyzed with regard to health care products and interventions.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HLTH 589Health Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
HWM - Health & Wellness ManagementTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HWM 499Special Topics in Health and Wellness Management3.00
 
LIBS - Library ScienceTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
LIBS 503Information Resources and Services3.00
Principles and philosophies of library reference service, information literacy, reading, listening and viewing guidance, and information resources with special emphasis on the Application of Wisconsin Model Academic Standards within the school library media center. Knowledge and use of major reference resources as well as discussions of strategies for effective information services.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LIBS 507Selecting and Organizing Library Resources3.00
Develops the ability to build and maintain resource collections by studying the principles and practices of selection, acquisition, and evaluation for resources to support the library's goals. Includes the study and application of standardized procedures for classifying and cataloging resources and maintaining electronics systems of collections.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LIBS 509Information Literacy Leadership3.00
Introduction to information literacy program development in a range of libraries. Examines leadership roles as they relate to information literacy and the collaborative teaching responsibility of librarians.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LIBS 510Young Adult Literature3.00
Examination of the range of print and mediated literature available to young adults. Criteria for evaluation, selection, and guidance in use to meet both student and curriculum uses are discussed. An appreciation for the literature is developed through experiences in reading, viewing, and classroom reporting.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LIBS 525Administration of Library Media Programs3.00
Introduction to administration of library/media programs with emphasis on leadership in the library/media program, the school, and the broader community of the library/media program and the library/media specialist profession. Examines the state and national guidelines appropriate to library/ media programs.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LIBS 606Children's Literature3.00
Study of the various types of fiction and nonfiction literatures published for, used with, or selected by children birth to age 12. Emphasis is on using children's literature across the content area with best practice instruction. Includes the selection, evaluation, appreciation, and use of children's literature and related media. Explores methods to help develop a child's interest in reading and ability to appreciate quality children's literature.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
LIBS 612Trends-Issues K-12 Literature3.00
Examination of literature for children and young adults published within the last 10 years. Includes reading and discussion of the literature and trends in children's and young adult reading. Also includes examination of current selection aids and other resources for teachers and librarians serving children and young adults. Topics include current thought on the digital age, internet and intellectual freedom issues, and the teaching of both children's and young adult literature in the classroom. Summer only.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
LIBS 616Advanced Administration of School Library Media Programs3.00
Focus on advanced preparation for work in the field of school library administration, including building as well as district perspective. Topics to be included are: the school library media specialist's role in school improvement, collaboration with teachers, and the importance of networking with the school, within the district, and in the professional field. Emphasis on "real world" issues affecting administration of school libraries, with discussion of current trends in the field. Summer only.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
LIBS 635Technology for Teaching and Learning3.00
Effective use of technology with students and faculty to facilitate teaching and learning. Educational media selection, design, production, and instructional delivery to meet Wisconsin and Minnesota information and technology literacy standards. Management and planning concepts for technology in schools and libraries.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LIBS 640Information Literacy3.00
LIBS 645Integrating Technology in the Library Media Program3.00
Use of educational theory to select, design, and implement advanced information and instructional technologies in the library media program. Development of skills in planning and providing organizational professional development, and in appropriate use of intellectual property in teaching and learning
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LIBS 650Topics in Library Science1.00 - 3.00
Concentrated study of current special or advanced topics/issues in librarianship. Topics are selected by library faculty based upon student/library community interest. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Summer only.
LIBS 685Library Practice1.00 - 3.00
Supervised practice in library situations providing opportunity for practical application of library principles. Primarily for those in non-teaching areas. Requires consent of the instructor. (N.B. For prospective teachers the practicum in school library media centers is included in the student teacher's professional sequence.)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
LIBS 690Supervised School Library Practicum Combined3.00
This course provides licensed teachers in the school library program with the opportunity to fully develop, practice, and reflect upon skills acquired through coursework in a supervised field experience in an elementary and a secondary school library and work in their own schools, as appropriate. Students create a portfolio demonstrating mastery of program competencies. Prerequisites: Graduate status, consent of instructor, completion of at least 21 credits at UW-Superior, 3.10 GPA in library media courses taken before entering the library media practicum.
LIBS 699Directed Studies in Librarianship1.00 - 3.00
Individualized study of a particular area or problem in librarianship. Topic selected requires approval of the instructor within the program who will be directing the study. May be taken in several units providing a different topic is taken each time.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
MATH - MathematicsTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
MATH 681Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in mathematical sciences. May be repeated when topics are different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
MUSI - MusicTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
MUSI 515Mixed Ensemble0.00 - 3.00
Study and performance of music suitable for mixed ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
 
PHYS - PhysicsTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
PHYS 681Special Topics1.00 - 6.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in physics selected by the faculty on the basis of community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study. May be repeated when topics are different. Instructor consent required.
 
PSYC - PsychologyTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
PSYC 789Psychology Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
 
SMGT - Sustainable ManagementTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
SMGT 700Cultural and Historical Foundations of Sustainability3.00
The changing relationships of humans to the natural environment; changes in dominant scientific perspectives and the process of scientific debate. The quest for understanding, manipulating, and dominating the natural world. Cultural and organizational structures; the role and impact of technology; the systems approach to problem solving and its implications for the future.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 710The Natural Environment3.00
Natural cycles, climate, water, energy, bio-systems, eco-systems, the role of humans in the biosphere; human impacts on natural systems. Use of case studies; some pre-reading, carbon cycle as a unifying theme. Disturbance pollution and toxicity; carrying capacity; natural capital.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 720Applied Research and the Triple Bottom Line3.00
Document and project internal and external costs resulting from the inseparability of the natural, social and economic environments. Assess sustainability issues using basic modeling techniques; cause and effect, root cause analysis, regression analysis and business scenario based cases.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 730Policy, Law and Ethics of Sustainability3.00
The Law and Ethics regarding sustainability of Economic development and emerging environmental challenges at national and international levels; including National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Carbon Footprints, Kyoto protocol, and Brundtland Commission. The policy and role of government and its agencies such as Army Corps of Engineers; Department of Interior, etc., in building a more just, prosperous, and secure environmental common future.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 740Economics of Sustainability3.00
Understand the economy as a component of the ecosystem within which it resides, with natural capital added to the typical analysis of human, social, built, and financial capital. Explore traditional micro, macro, and international trade theory and policy and the implications of sustainability. Topics include: history of economic systems and thought; globalization and localization; distinguishing between growth and development; the nature and causes of market failure; consumption, consumerism, and human well-being; emerging markets; technological change; business organization and financial market alternatives; demographic change; and the global food economy.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 750The built Environment3.00
Explore how the built environment came to be and the intersection of human needs: water, air, food, water, waste, transportation, healthcare and education. Evaluate community design: what does a sustainable community look like? Study related technologies and evaluate alternatives, discuss unintended consequences. Course will include case studies.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 760Geopolitical Systems3.00
An examination of decision making and public policy for sustainability at the national, state, and local level, with emphasis on the social, economic, political factors affecting decisions within both the public and private sectors. Attention is given to formal American policy making processes, informal grassroots activities and consensus building, public engagement with sustainability decisions, corporate sustainability actions and reporting, the promise of public-private partnerships and collaborative decision making, and practical examples of how decision making fosters effective transitions to sustainability goals at all levels.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 770Leading Sustainable Organizations3.00
A macro-level perspective on leading sustainable organizations. Topics addressed include: organizational change and transformation processes, strategic and creative thinking, organizational structures and their impacts, conflict management and negotiation, stake holder management and situational leadership styles and behaviors. Focuses on how organizational leaders develop and enable sustainable organizations, especially in times of environmental change.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 780Corporate Social Responsibility3.00
Corporate social responsibility and an organization. Evaluation of risks and potential impacts in decision making recognizing the links between the success of an organization and the well being of a community. Integrating corporate social responsibility throughout an organization, creating metrics and communicating CSR policies internally and externally. Development of best practices in an organization pertaining to corporate social responsibility.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 782Supply Chain Management3.00
Planning, organizing and controlling the organization's supply chain is examined in context of the triple bottom line. Total cost analyses or product and process life cycles are considered in the context of strategy and operations. Topics include: sourcing, operations, distribution, reverse logistics and service supply chains. Process measurements and the impact on organizational performance in the context of footprints (e.g. carbon, water, pollution). Discussion of existing and potential software systems.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 784Sustainable Water Management3.00
This course addresses practical applications of sustainability in aquatic environments. Topics covered include water and health, water quality and quantity, governance, assessing the aquatic environment, water treatment technologies, environmental mitigation, and impacts of climate change. Emphasis will be on selected areas of interest from the perspective of public health, engineering, and municipal conservation management.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
SMGT 785Waste Management and Resource Recovery3.00
Topics include the generation, processing, management and disposal of municipal, industrial and agricultural waste with an emphasis on the technical, economic and environmental aspects of various recovery processes. Additional topics will include producer responsibility, design for environment and life cycle analysis.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 790Capstone Preparation Course1.00
Research, data analysis, scholarly inquiry resulting in project proposal.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 792Capstone Project3.00
Completion of approved project utilizing concepts from coursework.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 795Special Topics in Sustainable Management3.00
Various specialized areas of sustainable management will be examined. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
SOCI - SociologyTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
SOCI 699Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Supervised independent study and/or research in Sociology. Required prior contract with instructor.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101 and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
SPED - Special EducationTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
SPED 681Seminars in Special Education0.50 - 4.00
Selected topics and issues in the area of special education. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or issue is studied each time.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
SPED 704Assessment of Learners with Exceptionalities3.00
Addresses the study of measurement theory and basic statistics needed for understanding assessment. Also focuses on general test construction, appropriate instrument selection with awareness of limitations, multicultural, and ethical considerations. Assessment interpretation and IEP preparation is examined in depth. Students experience the administration, interpretation and reporting of a select sample of assessment tools. Lab fee.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SPED 710Neurocognition3.00
This course provides a survey of current research in cognitive neuroscience on language, memory, learning, perception and other higher cognitive functions. Neurocognition involves learning about the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, along with some coverage of the endocrine system. Presentation of course material is based on typical and atypical development and functioning. Illustrative pathological development and atypical conditions are reviewed as well, such as developmental dyslexia, autistic disorders, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
SPED 721Play3.00
The primary tool in the early childhood professions is play. This course focuses exclusively on working with families and children between the ages of birth through eight years. Provides an overview of the essential elements and principles of play, including history, theories, modalities, techniques, therapies, applications and skills. An experiential component focuses on basic intervention skill development within the context of ethical and diversity-sensitive practice.
SPED 744Cognitive Behavioral Counseling3.00
Provides students with an in-depth knowledge base of cognitive-behavioral theories, past and present. Addresses theoretical concepts from an historical perspective, applied intervention strategies associated with theoretical underpinnings, and a review of past and current outcome research relevant to theoretical conceptualizations of the seminal work of Bandura, Beck, Ellis, Festinger, Glass, Meichenbaum, among others.
SPED 750The Exceptional Learner3.00
Students research the various federally identified disability groupings of exceptionalities including examination of the effect of federal, state, and local laws and policies on education for students with these exceptionalities. Research into the historical perspectives, legislation and litigation provides background for discussion of current models, theories and philosophies of special education today. Students complete (present) a classroom project (paper) related to current legislation, regulations, policies and/or ethical issues surrounding educational services for students with exceptionalities.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
SPED 752Introduction to ECSE3.00
Develops knowledge and skills to identify and teach children birth through age 8 with exceptional educational needs and talents. Also examines principles and theories of child growth and development, learning theory, and classroom organization. Develops knowledge to apply developmentally appropriate assessment tools and to promote parent education and family involvement in regard to EEN young children.
SPED 758Methods of Adaptive Instruction3.00
Students observe, research and reflect upon methods, strategies, and materials for adapting curricula to meet the learning needs of students with mild to severe high-incidence exceptional educational needs. Emphasizes knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to evaluate students' academic and social needs, research and design appropriate curricula,make modifications and adaptations throughout and across curricular, differentiate curriculum and instruction, and use research-based teaching strategies. Students modify an existing curricular element and practice the modification with one or more students in the field.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completions of SPED SPED 750.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SPED 760Behavior Analysis and Intervention3.00
Students research and discuss behavior theories, strategies and programs, functional analysis of behavior, positive behavior interventions and strategies, RTI, and behavior intervention plans. Students collect data to create a behavior intervention plan and apply it within an educational setting. Course emphasizes the application of theory to the academic and behavioral development of school-age children, especially those with exceptional educational needs and provides practice in communicating those applications and principles to parents, teachers and other community stakeholders.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SPED 762ECSE Methods I3.00
Emphasis on curriculum development, implementation, and evaluation based on typical and atypical child development, learning theory and educational research practice. The use of appropriate strategies to create and manage a learning environment. Develops curricular knowledge and skills to identify and teach children birth through age 8 with exceptional educational needs and talents. The course emphasizes integrated curriculum using art, music and movement. The characteristics of play and its contribution to the cognitive, social, emotional, communication, motor development and learning of children with developmental delays and disabilities birth through age eight. Developmentally based intervention methods are heavily emphasized.
SPED 763ECSE Methods II3.00
Focuses on curriculum development, implementation, and evaluation based on typical and atypical child development, learning theory and educational research and practice. Curricular integration of mathematics, science, and social studies for young children birth through age 8. Children's literature and language arts are integrated into the examination of those curriculum areas as supportive activities. Also requires the study of program, curriculum, and instructional approaches that contribute to the preparation of young children for work, including career exploration, practical application of basic skills, and employability skills and attitudes. The methods for organizing and modifying environments in collaboration with parents and other professionals to maximize the children's development through appropriate use of strategies, materials, equipment and technology.
SPED 764Mathematics Assessment and Strategies3.00
Examines assessment procedures and teaching strategies appropriate to providing instruction to students having difficulty learning mathematics. Emphasis is on differentiating and adapting existing curriculum to assist all students in reaching the goals of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM 2000).
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SPED 768Contemporary Issue and Transitions3.00
Engages students in research into and critical analysis of major emerging conceptual and practical issues in special education. Covers in depth topics related to collaboration, professional development, ethics, and transition services. Students complete and present a major project related to a contemporary issue in the provision of educational services to people with exceptionalities.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SPED 772Collaboration and Consultation in Special Education3.00
Focus on the major issues of learning and reflecting upon the skills and dispositions necessary for managing a special education classroom and/or case load. Includes curriculum design and evaluation, collaboration with multiple stakeholders, time management, assistive technology and universal design. A fieldwork curriculum research project and presentation in required.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SPED 775Special Education Internship: MC-EA1.00 - 4.00
Field-based experience in teaching students who have severe to mild exceptional educational needs in the areas of learning disabilities, cognitive disabilities and emotional behavioral disabilities. Students may choose one or more concentrations from the above listed disability areas. A student seminar meets regularly for study and discussion. Student complete and present a professional Special Educator portfolio.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SPED 776Special Education Internship: EA-A1.00 - 4.00
Field-based experience in teaching students who have severe to mild exceptional educational needs in the areas of learning disabilities, cognitive disabilities and emotional behavioral disabilities. Students may choose one or more concentrations from the above listed disability areas. A student seminar meets regularly for study and discussion. Student complete and present a professional Special Educator portfolio.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SPED 778ESCE Internship3.00 - 12.00
Field-based experience working with children birth to age eight who have developmental delays including severe to mild exceptional educational needs in the areas of learning disabilities, cognitive disabilities and emotional behavioral disabilities. A student seminar meets regularly for study and discussion. Students can be placed in a wide array of settings, including but not limited to schools, hospitals, early intervention programs, 0-3 programs, Early Head Start and Head Start. Students pursuing teacher certification must complete and present a professional special educator portfolio. Pass-Fail.
SPED 781Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Uniquely designed study arranged with a particular instructor which allows the graduate student to pursue specific areas of need or interest. Approval of the topic and plan of study is required before enrollment.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
SPED 782Service Delivery and Consultation3.00
Focuses on service delivery and consultation with early childhood programs serving children birth to age eight. Early childhood policy at the national and state level is covered in depth. Examines best practices for consultation and early childhood service development at the local, state and national levels. Child find strategies, informed referral networks, evaluation team responsibilities, individualized family service plans, individualized education program processes, and pertinent state and federal laws, regulations and policies. The appropriate methods of service delivery within natural settings in the home and community such as preschools, Head Start, and family- and center-based child care. The intra- and interagency collaboration and implementation of appropriate service coordination and consultation related to the care, education, and transition of young children and their families. Professional ethics and issues of advocacy, family rights, confidentiality, and teacher liability.
SPED 783SPED Research Project3.00
Students design and carry out a research project with the advice and approval of the advisor and special area consultant. Upon completion and approval of the research project, the student gives a presentation of the paper and publishes it on the digital university website.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
T ED - Teacher EducationTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
T ED 581Selected Topics and Problems in the Area of Teacher Education1.00 - 3.00
Offered only as Continuing Education credits. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or program is studied each time as requested.
T ED 589Teacher Education Elective1.00 - 99.00
Teacher Education Elective
T ED 607The Middle School and its Students3.00
Provides students with an understanding of the history, philosophy, organization, curriculum, teaching patterns, and particular student needs of middle-level educational institutions. Particular emphasis placed on the planning and maintenance of a school and classroom environment suited to middle-level students to prepare middle-level teachers with the background necessary to teach and work in middle-level schools with students aged 10-14. Includes up to 10 hours of middle-level field experience.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
T ED 686Administration of Child Development Programs3.00
Focuses on the rapidly changing field of child development programming. Emphasis on developing the business skills and knowledge that every director must have: funding, budgeting, selecting, training and supervising staff, housing the program, purchasing the equipment, and implementing a standards-based evaluation for the program. Specific licensing procedures, grant writing, and program accreditation are also covered in considerable depth. Designing accessible programs for both typical and atypically developing children is emphasized. Includes up to 10 hours of field experience in child development programs.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
T ED 689Teacher Education Elective1.00 - 99.00
Teacher Education Elective
T ED 694Principles and Practices of Inclusive Teaching3.00
Involves the principles inherent in the educational process for integrating children with exceptional needs into the general education school environment (K-12). Emphasizes application of these principles so that students are successful both academically and socially, and that all students within the system benefit. Designed specifically for the study of the inclusion of students with special educational needs into the general education program and development of teacher skills and knowledge to support this placement.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
T ED 699Directed Studies in Teacher Education0.50 - 6.00
Allows the student with special needs and interests to pursue particular areas and problems in education. The problem and/or plan of study requires approval of the instructor within the department who will be directing the study.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 711Mathematics Assessment and Strategies2.00
Examines assessment procedures and teaching strategies appropriate to providing instruction to students having difficulty learning mathematics. Emphasis on differentiating and adapting existing curriculum to assist all students in reaching the goals of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM 2000).
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
T ED 712Education for the 21st Century3.00
Fosters the study of historical, philosophical, and social foundations underlying the development, purposes, organization, and issues of K-12 education in the USA. Topics also include legal, ethical, political, and economic aspects, governance, roles and responsibilities of agencies and associations, and trends. [Paper on development of content specialization as an educational area and present practices and pedagogical issues would be a course assignment.] Basics in multicultural and non-sexist education, positive and appropriate portrayal of diversity, disabilities, and instructional strategies that build inclusivity are covered. (15 hours of observation and or tutoring.) Course specifically supports professional development in relation to Wisconsin teacher standards 1, 9, and 10 toward Professional Educator licenses; and INTASC and National Board Standards. (Sequence level 1)
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
T ED 713Development and Learning Theories3.00
Examines theories of typical and atypical child and adolescent development (physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and moral). Special emphasis is given to understanding and applications of learning theories and approaches that fit with development levels and enhance learning. Course begins to address diverse learners, motivation, management, and climate for learning that is appropriate for developmental levels. (15 hours of observation and or tutoring.) Course specifically supports professional development in relation to Wisconsin teacher standards 1, 2, 3 and 4 toward Professional Educator licenses; and INTASC and National Board Standards. (Sequence level 1)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
T ED 724Teaching as Reflective Decision Making: Professional Development for 21st Century3.00
Students clarify their professional needs and philosophies using understandings of current issues and license renewal processes, and reflective tasks regarding their own practice. For Wisconsin teachers and other teachers building a professional development plan/portfolio, this course offers support in identifying and reflecting on professional strengths and weaknesses in relation to standards in the field, and setting goals for professional development, as required by license renewal under Wisconsin PI34. Course specifically supports professional development in relation to Wisconsin teacher standards 1, 9, and 10 toward both the Professional and Master Educator licenses; and INTASC and National Board Standards.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
T ED 734Current Developments in Student Learning and Their Applications3.00
Study of foundational and recent theories in student learning, motivation, and learning environments, and their practical implementation in today's k-12 classroom. Focuses on how students learn and how to effect student engagement. Course specifically supports professional development in relation to Wisconsin teacher standards 2, 3, 5 and 6 toward both the Professional and Master Educator licenses; and INTASC and National Board Standards.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
T ED 739Workshop in Supervision of Student Teachers1.00
Participants are informed of the policies, procedures and methods used in the supervision of student teachers at UW-Superior. Aimed primarily at teachers who teach subjects and grade levels for which there are shortages of approved cooperating teachers.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 740Seminar in Supervision of Student Teachers/Interns2.00
Study of policies, procedures and methods used in supervision of student teachers and interns. Open to those who are actual or potential supervisors of student teachers and interns, and is a requirement for teachers who will serve as cooperating teachers in the student teaching and internship program.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
T ED 741Using Educational Assessment to Inform Practice3.00
Study of the principles followed in constructing, using and analyzing formal and informal assessment tasks, tools, standardized tests and results of educational research in the classroom. Course specifically supports professional development in relation to Wisconsin teacher standards 3, 8 and 10 toward both the Professional and Master Educator licenses; and INTASC and National Board standards.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
T ED 744Trends in Curricular and Instructional Practices3.00
Engages teachers in analyzing and reflecting on current developments and practices in curriculum planning and instructional strategies in k-12 classrooms. Course specifically supports professional development in relation to Wisconsin teacher standards 1, 4, and 7 toward both the Professional and Master Educator licenses; and INTASC and National Board standards.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
T ED 750Research Foundations of Education3.00
Research process as it relates to classroom teaching. Focus is on research design and methodology (quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods) as well as the practitioner's role in initiating and utilizing research. Students create a research proposal and plan. Course specifically supports professional development in relation to Wisconsin Teacher Standards 6, 7, 8 and 10.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
T ED 752Educational Research Project3.00
Students design and carry out a research project with the advice and approval of the advisor and special area consultant. Upon completion and approval of the research project by the advisor and consultant, the student gives an oral presentation of the paper to faculty and students. Course specifically supports professional development in relation to Wisconsin Teacher Standards 7, 8 and 9. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
T ED 781Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Specially designed studies to allow the graduate student to pursue specific areas of need or interest. Approval of the topic of study and the plan of study by the instructor directing the study is required before enrollment.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 789Teacher Education Elective1.00 - 99.00
Teacher Education Elective
 
WRIT - WritingTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
WRIT 695Directed Studies in Writing1.00 - 3.00
Supervised graduate study and research in Writing. Repeatable up to nine credits.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand

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