2012-2014 Catalog

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

General Education Courses

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CA: Communicating ArtsTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
COMM 110Introduction to Communication3.00
Introduction to concepts and theories of communication and the application of those theories to interpersonal interactions, small group processes, and public address.
General Education Attributes:
CA Communicating Arts
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
FYS 105First Year Seminar-Communicating Arts3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
CA Communicating Arts
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FYS 115First-Year Seminar-Communicating Arts, Non Western3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
CA Communicating Arts
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 125First-Year Seminar-Communicating Arts and Diversity3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
CA Communicating Arts
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
 
DIV: DiversityTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ANTH 101The Human Experience3.00
Introduction to the principles, concepts and methods of cultural anthropology. Consideration of the ways in which cultural anthropology contributes to the understanding of human diversity.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CJUS 312Gender,Crime,and Justice3.00
Exploration of the social construction of gender in crime and delinquency as well as in justice systems; analysis of how assumptions about female and male natures, as well as appropriate roles and positions in society affect the interpretation and application of law; comparison of women/girls and men/boys as offenders, victims and practitioners. Cross-listed as CJUS/WST 312.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COMM 467Advanced Intercultural Communication3.00
Advanced analysis of the communication dimensions involved in enhancing intercultural interactions. Focus is on identity and communication and their relationship to each other in a diverse world.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall and Summer Terms
ENGL 228Multi-Ethnic American Literature3.00
Survey of a variety of multi-ethnic American literatures, including Native American, African-American, Hispanic, Latino/a, Asian American, and various European- American writings starting with the oral traditions up the 20th Century.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 229Literature by Women3.00
Survey of British and American women's literature from the Middle Ages to the Contemporary Period. Women's literature across cultures, genres, and time periods.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ENGL 328Multi-Ethnic American Novels3.00
Study of novels by contemporary multi-ethnic American writers.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 6 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FNS 110Survey of First Nations Culture3.00
Examination of traditional and contemporary First Nations culture. Includes the legends, religion, poetry, music, design, dance, oratory, and history of tribal groups in North America.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FNS 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
FNS 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 230First Nations Myths and Legends3.00
Introduction to the oral tradition of First Nations people. Explores traditional stories and legends told by native peoples for generations. Students will understand the meaning they provided past generations of people and how their message is carried into the modern world.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 242First Nations Values and Spiritual Beliefs3.00
Examines a broad range of First Nations religious beliefs as they relate to the various cultural values of First Nations in North America. Emphasis on the spiritual significance of First Nations ceremonies and their relationship to the environment. Traditional teachings of First Nations will be examined as they relate to the lifestyles of First Nations people historically and today.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
FNS 304First Nations Literature3.00
Examines literature by and about First Nations people. Students read novels, short stories, and poetry by First Nations authors. Students will be made aware of how this literature differs from traditional western literature in content and theme. Also covers traditional stories that contemporary First Nations literature is based on.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
FNS 324First Nations Wisconsin History3.00
History of the native peoples of Wisconsin from prehistoric times to the present. Major emphasis on the six federally recognized tribes in Wisconsin. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 324. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 386Social Work Practice with American Indian Families3.00
Addresses social work practice issues related to contemporary American Indian family life, including recognition of the importance of American Indian tribal contexts; development and implementation of the Indian Child Welfare Act; impact of sovereignty and other social policy issues on American Indian families; and effective approaches to use when helping American Indian families. Offers an opportunity to better understand and work more effectively with American Indian families. Open to non-majors and can be used as a General Education diversity requirement. Cross-listed FNS/SOW 386.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 460The Study of First Nations Women3.00
Exploration of the First Nations woman's social roles and lifestyles from a variety of tribal cultures in North America. Focuses on traditional and contemporary values and roles of First Nations women. Cross-listed as FNS/WST 460.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FNS 480First Nations Society and Culture: Field Research3.00
Teaches basic social science research techniques and how they apply to the First Nations community. Group or individual field research projects will be completed during the semester.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
FNS 481Counseling the First Nations3.00
Explores counseling theory and application techniques from a First Nations perspective. First Nations world view and linear vs. holistic thinking are principle topics. Group and individual counseling is addressed and practiced. Designed for people in helping professions that deal with First Nations clients. Cross-listed as COUN 481/681.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
FYS 121First Yr Seminar-Humanities-History-Diversity3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 122First Year Seminar-Humanities-Literature-Diversity3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 123First-Year Seminar-World Language, Culture and Philosophy, Diversity3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 124First-Year Seminar-Social Sciences, Diversity3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 125First-Year Seminar-Communicating Arts and Diversity3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 128First Year Seminar-FA-Art Hist Criticism and Appreciation and Diversity3.00
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 129First-Year Seminar-Aesthetic Experience and Diversity3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
HIST 115History of World Religions3.00
An introduction to the history of religions and how they are related with examples of Abrahamic, Dharmic, Taoic and indigenous religions. Includes visits and films. Code 7; World History.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
HIST 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
HIST 254African-American Voices3.00
Explores the African-American experience over the past two centuries with an emphasis on social and political discourse. The ideas of major political, literary, cultural and intellectual figures, as well as the content of black folk and popular culture, will be examined in a social and historical context. Authors include Douglass, DuBois, Hurston, Garvey, King, Malcolm X, and bell hooks. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 320Workers in Industrial America3.00
An examination of workers and work in the modern United States. Topics range from the nature of the modern workplace to the impact of the labor movement. Examines the impact of industrialization on workers and work, and the efforts of working men and women to shape their working lives. Issues of Political Economy, including but not limited to collective bargaining, are emphasized. Code 1. DIV.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
HIST 322Women and Men in American Society3.00
Evolution of gender roles in the United States from colonial times to present. Explores the changing roles of men and women in American society and investigates social, economic, and political factors that produce these changes. Code 1. G. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 322.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 323The Asian-American Experience3.00
Examines the historical experience of Asian immigrants and how they developed into "Asian-Americans." Addresses the problem of the essentialization of Asian-Americans and instead seeks to show the complexities and conflict involved in the image or construction of Asian-Americans. Deconstructs notions of race, ethnicity and discrimination and uses other categories of analysis, such as gender and class, to understand the historical experience of Asian-Americans. Code 1. RE.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
HIST 324First Nations Wisconsin History3.00
History of the native peoples of Wisconsin from prehistoric times to the present. Major emphasis on the six federally recognized tribes in Wisconsin. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 324. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
HIST 393Topics in Modern Southeast Asia3.00
This course focuses on one or two major themes in Southeast Asian history through both a regional lens as well as through national histories of Burma/Myanmar, the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Cambodia and Vietnam. Some of the theses include European colonization and the indigenous response; the shaping of a modern colonial plural society; the effects of economic transformation; anti-colonialism and nationalism, decolonization, the Cold War and nation-building; race and racism; the history of marginalized and everyday groups; women and gender in the construction of social and political identities; and so on. Code 5; Asian History.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 403African Voices on Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, history, anthropology and fiction about gender issues in Africa. Topics vary from year to year and may include the legacy of slavery and race prejudice, health and gender, the impact of colonialism, environmental causes, African gender identities, the impact of war, and women as peacemakers. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 403. Code 3, G.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
HIST 404Arab Voices on Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, fiction, history and ethnography about gender issues in the Arab World. Topics vary from year to year and may include topics like women and nationalism, progress through education and ideology, the Arab feminist movement, gender identities in Arab societies, gender in Islam. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 404. Code 6, G.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
HIST 406Construction of Gender in East Asia3.00
Advanced seminar course examining the construction of gender in East/Southeast Asia. The construction of gender is placed into a historical context of East Asia, with emphasis on how the nation-state, the family, and war/imperialism affected gender roles and norms. Although primarily focused on the modern period, the course examines the pre-modern context as means to assess the continuities and ruptures in gender roles. In addition, the course devotes more time to women's perspectives because women's voices historically have been marginalized; however, the course examines the construction of masculinity. Strong theoretical focus: construction of gender, the ideology of Orientalism, and the relationship of nationalism and gender. Extensive use of feature films and documentaries, primarily from East Asia, that complement the readings, and how to analyze film as a means to understand the construction of gender. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 406.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 407History of Women and Work in the Pacific Rim3.00
Images of factory girls in sweat shops, under-aged prostitutes, and foreign nannies are prominent in portrayals of East Asia. This course investigates the history behind the how Asian women are racialized through a labor-class nexus, starting in the 19th century and continuing to the present. Some crucial questions will be: How did the state and media transform Asian concepts of gendered ethics to establish a cheap labor pool for emerging industries? How did mechanized wage labor change the status of women as workers? How did laborers mobilize and negotiate for better working and living conditions without unions? What types of subcultures emerged around “factory girl” communities? How did the trafficking of women’s bodies change over time? This course is designed to read East Asian films, history texts and fiction as a means to understand and analyze the past through aesthetic mediums. This course centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essays. Code 5, RE, G. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 407.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
HIST 460The Holocaust in Modern Memory3.00
The Holocaust, which took place over half a century ago, has never been more present than it is today. From the United States to France to Germany, Poland, Russia and Bosnia, the incantation to “Never Forget!” exercises more power today than ever before; even more than in the immediate aftermath of the war. But why should that be true? Why is it that the memory of this particular event should have such power over generations so far removed in both time and space -- particularly when other episodes of genocidal violence, similar in scale and historical importance, play almost no role in our collective memories and consciousness? In part, this course brings to students a fuller appreciation of just what “the Holocaust” was; to understand precisely what the attempted genocide of European Jews, Roma, Poles, homosexuals, mentally ill, and others involved, and how and why it happened. While investigating those kinds of factual questions, however, the main focus is on the memory of the Holocaust as memory. Why is the Holocaust remembered? What is remembered, and what is forgotten? What are the ways in which the memories of the Holocaust are used by various societies, and how/why do they differ? Much reading and discussion focuses on different ways in which facts and memories of the Holocaust are used to draw meanings -- about Germany, about Jews, about mankind, about history -- and how those types of decisions can have profound consequences for the way a given society or group behaves and feels in the present. Code 2, RE.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
LSTU 357Law and Colonialism3.00
Investigates in what ways legal doctrines and procedures were deployed by Western colonial powers to demean and denigrate the equality and humanity of peoples whom they sought to subjugate.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
LSTU 365Race, Class, Gender and the Law3.00
Explores how the law has interacted with, impacted and affected race, ethnicity, gender and class issues in the United States context. Students read and criticize key legal cases, explore arguments made in legal settings about race/ethnicity/class/gender, examine the areas of silence or inaction by the law and assess the current interconnection between race, ethnicity, class, gender and the law. Fulfills diversity requirement of General Education.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
MUSI 161Music and World Culture3.00
Survey of non-Western musical cultures, including ethnic origins of folk and traditional music in America. Required listening. Open to all students.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 266Jazz Appreciation3.00
History of jazz from its beginnings to its most progressive trends, using compositions and recordings to trace its stylistic and technical developments. Open to all students.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHIL 330Teaching for Social Justice3.00
Students will investigate what it means to be a teacher who is concerned with social justice. Central concerns will include: identifying and addressing inequalities of power within the classroom; making the classroom a liberating (rather than oppressive) place; the self-reflective classroom; and how to respond to students' (latent and manifest) sexism, racism, classism and homophobia. This course will be relevant to those with interests in philosophy, women's and gender studies, and for those planning to work in education, social service, non-profits, or community activism.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHIL 365Philosophy of Love and Sex3.00
In this course we will begin with the assumption that love and sex cannot be reduced to "a commotion of one's anatomy." Instead we will consider them as two of the most meaningful aspects of human existence, as our most intimate and profound ways of relating to others and to ourselves. Cross-listed as PHIL/WST 365.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 459Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering3.00
This course will explore pregnancy, childbirth, and mothering from two perspectives-the embodied experience of women and its political-social context. We will consider how women's firsthand experiences of motherhood are responses to a broader social milieu. This approach will enable us to think about a variety of philosophical themes and questions with regard to our topic including: philosophical method, embodiment, sex and gender, the origins of ethics, moral obligation, virtue, moral luck, intersubjectivity, and oppression. Cross-listed as PHIL/WST 459.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
POLS 374Women and Politics3.00
In the United States, women hold 18% of the seats in the 112th Congress, marking the nation 85th in its level of representation for women. Globally, women constitute 15% of all members of parliament, although significant regional variation persists. How do gendered hierarchies continue to shape and structure political systems? Why have women not yet reached parity in elected office? Should women be represented as women? What difference do women bring to elective office? These and other questions are explored throughout the course, with particular attention to the historical exclusion of women from the public arena, the methods used by women to enter electoral and activist politics, and the current political status of women in the United States and globally. Cross-listed as POLS/WST 374.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
PSYC 258Psychology Of Women3.00
Discussion and study of development of women's roles and personality across the lifespan. Topics include the social construction of sex and gender differences, images of women, status and power, childhood and adolescence, womanhood, love and romance, commitments and relationships, mothering, work and achievement, midlife and beyond, and violence against women. Meets a requirement for the Women's Studies minor and General Education diversity credit. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). Cross-listed as PSYC/WST 258.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PSYC 360Cross-Cultural Psychology3.00
Introduction to the effects of culture on who we are and how we view social behavior, including cultural influences on aggression, helping, dominance and conformity. Classroom activities and assignments are aimed at experiencing differences in culture. Meets the requirement for the General Education diversity credit.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
SO W 386Social Work Practice with American Indian Families3.00
Addresses social work practice issues related to contemporary American Indian family life, including recognition of the importance of American Indian tribal contexts; development and implementation of the Indian Child Welfare Act; impact of sovereignty and other social policy issues on American Indian families; and effective approaches to use when helping American Indian families. Offers an opportunity to better understand and work more effectively with American Indian families. Open to non-majors and can be used as a General Education diversity requirement. Cross-listed FNS/SOW 386.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SOCI 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/WST 210.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SOCI 273Race and Ethnicity3.00
Examines the social production of racial and ethnic categories as well as the practices that enact these categories. After examining the representation of these categories as "natural," the course uses local and global evidence to investigate the institutional and representational processes that historically create and modify race and ethnicity.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
SOCI 460Social Class3.00
Global examination of systematic social inequality. Core topics include causes, trends and contemporary patterns of social stratification, their effects upon social life, and philosophical perspectives on inequality.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Prerequisites:
Completion of SOCI 101 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
SPAN 315Voices of Hispanic Women3.00
Course taught in Spanish focusing on the lives and experiences of Hispanic women writers, artists, and filmmakers from Latin America, the United States, and Spain. Examines the present status of women as they leave the traditional setting of home and emerge into the public sphere of influence and power. Studies the effects of poverty, war, and revolution on women and their families as well as the impact of immigration on identity and self.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SPAN 202, appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
WRIT 255Gender and Sexuality in Writing3.00
Explores writing on gender and sexuality with a focus on texts by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex (LGBTQI) and allied writers from diverse cultures, classes, races, and ethnicities. Students discover and deepen their own perspectives through writing and reading. Students of all genders and gender identities are welcome. Cross listed as WRIT/WST 255.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
WRIT 348Women's Autobiography3.00
Study of contemporary and/or classic works of women's autobiography. Writing of autobiographical and analytic essays related to gender by both female and male students. Study of theoretical perspectives on gender and autobiography. Prerequisites: ENGL 102 or WRIT 102 or consent of instructor. Cross-listed as WRIT/WST 348.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Prerequisites:
ENGL 102 is a prerequisite
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
WST 150Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies3.00
Focuses on how we experience gender, particularly women's experiences, and how we can work toward gender equity. Students encounter diverse voices and perspectives, including those of gay, lesbian, bisexual, heterosexual, transgender, and intersex people. Discussion, small-group work, readings, films, and a hands-on project
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
WST 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/WST 210.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
WST 255Gender and Sexuality in Writing3.00
Explores writing on gender and sexuality with a focus on texts by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex (LGBTQI) and allied writers from diverse cultures, classes, races, and ethnicities. Students discover and deepen their own perspectives through writing and reading. Students of all genders and gender identities are welcome. Cross listed as WRIT/WST 255.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
WST 258Psychology Of Women3.00
Discussion and study of development of women's roles and personality across the lifespan. Topics include the social construction of sex and gender differences, images of women, status and power, childhood and adolescence, womanhood, love and romance, commitments and relationships, mothering, work and achievement, midlife and beyond, and violence against women. Meets a requirement for the Women's Studies minor and General Education diversity credit. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). Cross-listed as PSYC/WST 258.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
WST 312Gender,Crime,and Justice3.00
Exploration of the social construction of gender in crime and delinquency as well as in justice systems; analysis of how assumptions about female and male natures, as well as appropriate roles and positions in society affect the interpretation and application of law; comparison of women/girls and men/boys as offenders, victims and practitioners. Cross-listed as CJUS/WST 312.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
WST 322Women and Men in American Society3.00
Evolution of gender roles in the United States from colonial times to present. Explores the changing roles of men and women in American society and investigates social, economic, and political factors that produce these changes. Code 1. G. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 322.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
WST 365Philosophy of Love and Sex3.00
In this course we will begin with the assumption that love and sex cannot be reduced to "a commotion of one's anatomy." Instead we will consider them as two of the most meaningful aspects of human existence, as our most intimate and profound ways of relating to others and to ourselves. Cross-listed as PHIL/WST 365.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
WST 374Women and Politics3.00
In the United States, women hold 18% of the seats in the 112th Congress, marking the nation 85th in its level of representation for women. Globally, women constitute 15% of all members of parliament, although significant regional variation persists. How do gendered hierarchies continue to shape and structure political systems? Why have women not yet reached parity in elected office? Should women be represented as women? What difference do women bring to elective office? These and other questions are explored throughout the course, with particular attention to the historical exclusion of women from the public arena, the methods used by women to enter electoral and activist politics, and the current political status of women in the United States and globally. Cross-listed as POLS/WST 374.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
WST 403African Voices on Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, history, anthropology and fiction about gender issues in Africa. Topics vary from year to year and may include the legacy of slavery and race prejudice, health and gender, the impact of colonialism, environmental causes, African gender identities, the impact of war, and women as peacemakers. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 403. Code 3, G.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
WST 404Arab Voices on Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, fiction, history and ethnography about gender issues in the Arab World. Topics vary from year to year and may include topics like women and nationalism, progress through education and ideology, the Arab feminist movement, gender identities in Arab societies, gender in Islam. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 404. Code 6, G.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
WST 406Construction of Gender in East Asia3.00
Advanced seminar course examining the construction of gender in East/Southeast Asia. The construction of gender is placed into a historical context of East Asia, with emphasis on how the nation-state, the family, and war/imperialism affected gender roles and norms. Although primarily focused on the modern period, the course examines the pre-modern context as means to assess the continuities and ruptures in gender roles. In addition, the course devotes more time to women's perspectives because women's voices historically have been marginalized; however, the course examines the construction of masculinity. Strong theoretical focus: construction of gender, the ideology of Orientalism, and the relationship of nationalism and gender. Extensive use of feature films and documentaries, primarily from East Asia, that complement the readings, and how to analyze film as a means to understand the construction of gender. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 406.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
WST 407History of Women and Work in the Pacific Rim3.00
Images of factory girls in sweat shops, under-aged prostitutes, and foreign nannies are prominent in portrayals of East Asia. This course investigates the history behind the how Asian women are racialized through a labor-class nexus, starting in the 19th century and continuing to the present. Some crucial questions will be: How did the state and media transform Asian concepts of gendered ethics to establish a cheap labor pool for emerging industries? How did mechanized wage labor change the status of women as workers? How did laborers mobilize and negotiate for better working and living conditions without unions? What types of subcultures emerged around “factory girl” communities? How did the trafficking of women’s bodies change over time? This course is designed to read East Asian films, history texts and fiction as a means to understand and analyze the past through aesthetic mediums. This course centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essays. Code 5, RE, G. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 407.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
WST 459Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering3.00
This course will explore pregnancy, childbirth, and mothering from two perspectives-the embodied experience of women and its political-social context. We will consider how women's firsthand experiences of motherhood are responses to a broader social milieu. This approach will enable us to think about a variety of philosophical themes and questions with regard to our topic including: philosophical method, embodiment, sex and gender, the origins of ethics, moral obligation, virtue, moral luck, intersubjectivity, and oppression. Cross-listed as PHIL/WST 459.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
WST 460The Study of First Nations Women3.00
Exploration of the First Nations woman's social roles and lifestyles from a variety of tribal cultures in North America. Focuses on traditional and contemporary values and roles of First Nations women. Cross-listed as FNS/WST 460.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
 
ENG: EnglishTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FYS 116First Year Seminar-English/Writing3.00
General Education Attributes:
ENG English
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for this course is completion of ENGL/WRIT 099 with a grade of C- or better; or qualifying score on ACT English or SAT verbal or Wisconsin English Placement Test; or approval of Writing Coordinator for students taking ESL 132.
FYS 117First Year Seminar-English/Writing3.00
General Education Attributes:
ENG English
Prerequisites:
All students must pass with a grade of C- or better in FYS 116 or WRIT 101 to enroll in FYS 117
WRIT 101College Writing I3.00
Fundamentals of expository writing: writing of short essays, critical reading, introduction to library research.
General Education Attributes:
ENG English
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for this course is completion of ENGL/WRIT 099 with a grade of C- or better; or qualifying score on ACT English or SAT verbal or Wisconsin English Placement Test; or approval of Writing Coordinator for students taking ESL 132.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
WRIT 102College Writing II3.00
Continuation of ENGL 101 or WRIT 101, more advanced critical writing and reading, writing the documented library research essay. Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 101 or WRIT 101 or FYS 116; or qualifying score on ACT English or SAT Verbal or WEPT or AP Literature and Composition test or AP Language and Composition test; or approval of Writing Coordinator for students taking ESL 132. Students must pass with a C- or better to complete the College Writing Sequence.
General Education Attributes:
ENG English
Prerequisites:
All students must pass with a grade of C- or better to complete the College Writing Sequence.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
FAA: Fine Arts AppreciationTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ART 221Art History Survey:The Ancient World to the Renaissance4.00
A study of expression in art and architecture which contribute to the Western cultural tradition.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 222Art History Survey:Renaissance to Modern Art4.00
A continuation of ART 221 with emphasis on the changing role of art in Western culture.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 224Visual Arts in Non-Western Societies3.00
Study of visual arts in non-western societies including North American Indian/Native American; Mesoamerican; Oceania/Pacific Islands, Asian, and African cultures.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 331Black Art3.00
Topics: African American Art and African Art - Alternate every other fall. A survey of art created by people of African descent. Also discussed are some influences of Islam, Western Europe, and the Caribbean regions. Repeatable up to six credits.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COMM 104Film And Culture3.00
Survey of the motion picture as an art form and a medium of cultural communication from its beginning to the present day. A variety of films showing significant artistic development will be screened.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 122Theatre Appreciation3.00
Emphasizes the relationships between the technical and artistic components of theatre practice of the past and present from cultures around the world.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 285History of Theatre, Ancient to Realism3.00
Examination of a series of topics in theatre history from the Ancient World to Realism.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
COMM 286History of Theatre, Realism through Contemporary3.00
Examination of a series of topics in theatre history from Realism through Contemporary theatre.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FYS 108First-Year Seminar-Fine Arts/Crit and Appreciation3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 118First Year Seminar-FA-Art Hist,Criticism and Appreciation and Non-Western3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 128First Year Seminar-FA-Art Hist Criticism and Appreciation and Diversity3.00
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
MUSI 160Music Appreciation3.00
Study of the musical elements, forms, and stylistic periods in Western musical culture. Includes a discussion of composers' lives, individual styles, and representative works. Required listening.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 266Jazz Appreciation3.00
History of jazz from its beginnings to its most progressive trends, using compositions and recordings to trace its stylistic and technical developments. Open to all students.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
WRIT 215The Writer's Craft: Poetry and Drama3.00
The study of poems and plays, with emphasis on form and technique, increases awareness and appreciation of available subjects and strategies developed by writers over time.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
WRIT 216The Writer's Craft: Fiction3.00
The study of short stories and novels, with emphasis on form and technique, increases awareness and appreciation of available subjects and strategies developed by writers over time.
General Education Attributes:
FAA Fine Arts Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
 
FAAE: Fine Arts Aesthetic ExperienceTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ART 101Introduction to Art3.00
(For non-Art majors) Introduction to the field of Visual Art through a studio experience. Includes demonstrations, lectures and critiques planned to develop an appreciation of art as well as understanding media as a vehicle of expression.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 125Beginning Acting for Theatre3.00
Introduction to the principles of acting for the stage. Students learn vocal and breathing techniques, movement, scene work, and are introduced to the concept of playing an objective.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 180Introduction To Technical Theatre3.00
Basic introduction to the art of stagecraft to include the construction process, lighting, scenic painting and stage properties.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 200Theatre Fine Arts Practicum1.00 - 3.00
Students experience an involvement in an artistic and/or aesthetic activity. The experience in conjunction with University Theatre will be individually designed by the student and the supervising faculty member to fulfill its general education intent of developing a greater awareness of visual and/or performing creativity. Minimum 45 hours per credit. Repeatable up to three credits. Audition and/or contract from the instructor are required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 273Oral Interpretation3.00
Introduction to oral reading performance. Emphasis on vocal and breathing exercises to strengthen vocal potential, and the use of body and gesture to enhance the interpretation of literature.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FYS 109First-Year Seminar-Aesthetic Experience3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 119First-Year Seminar-Aesthetic Experience-Non Western3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 129First-Year Seminar-Aesthetic Experience and Diversity3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
HHP 133Folk-Square Dance2.00
Fundamentals of various styles and techniques of movement and dance.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 136Social Dance1.00
Social Dance - Fundamentals of various styles and techniques of movement and dance.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 104Brass Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for brass ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 105Woodwind Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for woodwind ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 106String Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
The study and performance of music suitable for string ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 107Chamber Choir0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for chamber choir. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 108Percussion Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
The study and performance of music suitable for percussion ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 109Jazz Combo0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for jazz combos. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 110A Cappella Choir0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of standard choral literature. Open to all students by audition. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 111Jazz Band0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of jazz band literature from the swing era through the most progressive trends. Open to all students by audition. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 112Symphonic Band0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of college band and wind ensemble literature. Open to all students by audition. Some university-owned instruments available. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 113Piano Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for piano ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 114University Orchestra0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of literature for orchestra and chamber orchestra from the 17th to 21st centuries. Open to all students by audition. Some university-owned instruments available. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 115Mixed Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for mixed ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 116Men's Choir0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for male choir. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 118Steel Drum Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for steel drum ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 120Applied Music-Flute/Piccolo1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Flute/Piccolo. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition and instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 121Applied Music-Oboe/English Horn1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Oboe/English Horn. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition and instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 122Applied Music-Clarinet1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction Clarinet. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition and instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 123Applied Music-Saxophone1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Saxophone. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition and instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 124Applied Music-Bassoon1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Bassoon. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition and instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 125Applied Music-French Horn1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in French Horn. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition and consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 126Applied Music-Trumpet1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Trumpet. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 127Applied Music-Trombone/Euphonium1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Trombone/Euphonium. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 128Applied Music-Tuba1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Tuba. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 129Applied Music-Percussion1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Percussion. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 130Applied Music-Guitar1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Guitar. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 131Applied Music-Harp1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Harp. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 132Applied Music-Violin1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Violin. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this class.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 133Applied Music-Viola1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Viola. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in the course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 134Applied Music-Cello1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Cello. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 135Applied Music-String Bass1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in String Bass. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 136Applied Music-Piano1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Piano. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for this course is consent of Music Faculty in area of applied study/or an audition.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 137Applied Music-Organ1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Organ. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or instructor consent is required to enroll this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 138Applied Music-Harpsichord1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Harpsichord. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 139Applied Music-Voice1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Voice. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 170Introduction To Music3.00
This is the first music education course in the two-course preparation for the elementary education degree program. Goals: development of Western music skills and understanding in music, reading, playing, singing, informed listening skills, understanding in beginning music theory and applied creative thinking in music for lifelong social music taking. Music majors and minors may not apply this course toward their major or minor.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
WRIT 250Introduction to Creative Writing3.00
Introductory creative writing course in which students develop their ability to write in a variety of genres. Study of contemporary works in genres including literary prose, poetry, and drama; composition in genres including literary prose, poetry, and drama; development of a writing process and writerly identify; workshop critiques of student writing.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
WRIT 251Creative Writing: Memoir3.00
Introductory creative writing course in which students develop their ability to write autobiographical essays. Study of exemplary contemporary texts; composition of brief memoirs; workshop critiques of student writing.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
WRIT 252Creative Writing: Poetry3.00
Introductory creative writing course in which students develop their ability to write poetry. Study of exemplary contemporary texts; composition of poems in both free verse and traditional forms; workshop critiques of student writing.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
WRIT 253Creative Writing: Fiction3.00
Introductory creative writing course in which students develop their ability to write short fiction. Study of exemplary contemporary texts; composition of short fiction; workshop critiques of student writing.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
WRIT 270Contemporary Topics in Writing3.00
Studies in writing. May be repeated for credit with different content.
General Education Attributes:
FAAE Fine Arts Aesthetic Experience
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ENGL 102, WRIT 102, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
 
HH: Humanities-HistoryTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FNS 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
FNS 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FYS 101First-Year Seminar- Humanities/History3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 111First Year Seminar-Humanities-History, Non-Western3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 121First Yr Seminar-Humanities-History-Diversity3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 111Modern World History3.00
Examines forces that bring areas of the world together, including Chinese and Ottoman trade and conquest, the consolidation of nation states like Portugal, Spain and Japan and their interactions with trade and colonization, the Columbian exchange and the impact of the New World, the slave trades from Africa and migrations to the Americas, revolutions in Europe and the Americas, colonization in Asia and Africa and nationalist movements, wars of ideology and resources: world wars, cold wars, and Middle Eastern wars. Emphasis on learning to think globally. Code 7.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 115History of World Religions3.00
An introduction to the history of religions and how they are related with examples of Abrahamic, Dharmic, Taoic and indigenous religions. Includes visits and films. Code 7; World History.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 151History of the United States Through 18773.00
Examination of a series of questions and controversies in United States history from the European conquest to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Explores issues such as the nature of the U.S. Constitution, immigration and industrialization, slavery and emancipation. Provides general education students and majors with an introduction to history as a field of study. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 152The United States Since 18773.00
Examination of a series of questions and controversies in United States history from the late 19th Century through the present. Explores such issues as labor and social class, race and civil rights, gender and women's rights, the U.S. as global superpower, the Great Depression and social reform. Provides general education students and majors with an introduction to history as a field of study. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 160Arab Identities3.00
Explores the construction of Arab identities through language, culture, the spread of Islam and historical events: the birth of Islam, the colonial experience, Arab nationalism, Pan Arabism, the Palestinian conflict. Examines forces that brought Arabs together and those that have been divisive: social class, religions and sects, ethnicities in the Lebanese Civil War and Iraqi conflicts. Films. No prior knowledge needed. Code 6. RE.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 161African Peoples and Issues3.00
Introductory course on modern Africa which covers major historical trends. Particularly useful for future high school teachers. Covers topics like the slave trade, the impact of colonialism, nationalist resistance movements, African aspirations at independence and political unity and disunity. Many films are shown and all texts are written by Africans, including autobiography, drama and novels. Code 3.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
HIST 212The Ancient Mediterranean World3.00
General-education-level course introducing students to the basic outlines of the history of the Mediterranean region -- including Greece, Rome, Spain, northern Africa, and Palestine -- from the earliest times to the Middle Ages. While investigating some key events and stories from these places and times, students learn to critically evaluate the ways these stories are re-told in our time, using actual texts and documents from the times in comparison to books and movies about those times from our day. Code 2.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 219History of Premodern East Asia3.00
Examination of “premodern” East Asia with emphasis on: East Asian philosophical and spiritual traditions and how these traditions affected the development of East Asian civilizations; the contribution East Asia played in the development of European and world history; and to challenge Euro-centric perspectives that often view East Asia civilization as monolithic, static, and backward. Some particular themes include how Confucianism created a self-regulated society, how Chinese civilization developed and implemented a democratic ethos in government, Genghis Khan and the making of the modern world, the great treasure fleets of the Ming Dynasty, and Japanese samurai (warrior) culture. Course uses several East Asian films and documentaries as a means to understand and analyze the past through a film medium. Course centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essay. Code 5.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 220History of Modern Asia3.00
Examination of Asia in the modern period (1600 to present). Requires no prior knowledge of the region. Emphasizes how the rise of the West affected the historical development of Asia and how Asia responded to Western dominance. Themes include: why the powerful Chinese tributary system failed to meet the challenge of Western colonialism and conversely, how Japan became the first Asian nation to utilize western-style gunboat diplomacy to expand its empire; why race played a significant role in the Asian Pacific Theater during World War II; the communist revolutions throughout Asia; and how Southeast Asian countries have struggled for national sovereignty since the Cold War. Uses several Asian films and documentaries as a means to understand and analyze the past through a film medium. Centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essays. Code 5.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
HIST 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
HIST 225Latin America Since Independence3.00
Introduction to major themes and issues in modern Latin American history. Focus is on issues of development and underdevelopment. Students consider various theories of underdevelopment and weigh their relative merits using Latin America as a case study. Code 4.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 230Modern Europe-1500 to 1800 CE3.00
Introductory course tracing development of European societies from the great artistic, economic, and scientific transformations at the end of the Middle Ages up to the full flowering of the “modern age” at the end of the 18th century. While the basic structure is a broad survey covering 300 years and all regions of Europe, a focus on selected key issues -- such as the Protestant Reformation, Galileo to the Scientific Revolution, the Columbian Exchange to the emergence of Capitalism -- allows students to delve more deeply into history while also introducing them to basic questions and methods of the historical discipline. Code 2.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 231Contemporary Europe 1800 to 2000 CE3.00
Introductory course surveying the past two centuries of “Modern” Europe. Close attention to key episodes -- like the Industrial Revolution, the artistic revolts of Romanticism and Modernism, the rise of Fascism and other “totalitarian” ideologies, and the recent collapse of the Berlin Wall -- will afford a broad overview of European developments from 1800 to the present from a variety of methodological perspectives: economic, political, social, and cultural. As an introductory level, General Education course, it introduces students to the basic questions and methods of the historical discipline. Code 2.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 240Africa In Early Times3.00
How do we know early African history? Looks at archaeology in South Africa, oral traditions in Mali, written documents in West and East Africa, ethnography of the East African coast and a fictional treatment of the slave trade between Dahomey and Brazil. Many films. Code 3.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 241Africa In Modern Times3.00
A topics course that looks at modern trends in African history, including the slave trade, colonialism, independence movements, challenges of national unity and economic and social progress. Several films. Code 3.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 254African-American Voices3.00
Explores the African-American experience over the past two centuries with an emphasis on social and political discourse. The ideas of major political, literary, cultural and intellectual figures, as well as the content of black folk and popular culture, will be examined in a social and historical context. Authors include Douglass, DuBois, Hurston, Garvey, King, Malcolm X, and bell hooks. Code 1.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 281The Muslim World3.00
Survey-level course introduces students to a variety of topics about the Muslim world from multidisciplinary perspectives. The time and life of the prophet Muhammad, the rise of great Islamic empires, Islam and women, the spread of Islam in America and the explosion of Islamic resurgence and extremism are all topics for consideration. Code 6.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
POLS 175The Making of the Modern Global System3.00
Is another world possible? Could we have inherited a different global order? We examine the pillars of current global order, such as the rise of capitalism, emergence of state, violence, imperialism, rise and fall of dominant states, and emergence of democratic values and institutions. We particularly examine how we as individuals interact and help maintain the current global order with an understanding that we can change the current order for a better order in the future. The second part of the course examines various theories of how to understand the global order ranging from realism, liberalism, Marxism, to globalization, human security and feminism.
General Education Attributes:
HH Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
HHE: World Lang, Culture, PhilosTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
CHIN 101Beginning Chinese I3.00
Study of language fundamentals with emphasis on development of listening and speaking skills. Practice with reading and writing. Chinese characters are taught and used. Presumes no previous language study.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHIN 102Beginning Chinese II3.00
Continuation of CHIN 101. This course is appropriate for someone with up to two years of high school Chinese.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of Chinese 101 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CHIN 201Intermediate Chinese3.00
Continuation of CHIN 102. Appropriate for someone with up to two years of high school Chinese. This third semester course continues building on the student's previous Chinese knowledge by introducing new vocabulary, characters, grammar, and usage. Students who complete this course should be able to initiate discussion on topics of daily life, understand more complicated sentences, and write short compositions. Mandarin pronunciation is taught.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of Chinese 102 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHIN 202Intermediate Chinese II3.00
Appropriate for someone with two or more years of high school Chinese. Introduces additional characters with more complicated dialogue and sentence patterns with continued practice of Mandarin pronunciation. Students read and discuss supplemental materials including Chinese proverbs and folk stories.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of Chinese 202 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 101Beginning Ojibwa Language4.00
For beginning students in Ojibwa language. Introduction to the phonetics, pronunciation, and rhythm of the Ojibwa language. A standardized spelling system and basic vocabulary will be used; focus on oral fluency.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
FNS 110Survey of First Nations Culture3.00
Examination of traditional and contemporary First Nations culture. Includes the legends, religion, poetry, music, design, dance, oratory, and history of tribal groups in North America.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FNS 201Intermediate Ojibwa Language4.00
Speaking and comprehension of basic Ojibwa speech patterns. Development of rudimentary reading knowledge, conversational skills, and elementary grammar. Emphasis on vocabulary development and cultural perspectives. No prerequisite.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 230First Nations Myths and Legends3.00
Introduction to the oral tradition of First Nations people. Explores traditional stories and legends told by native peoples for generations. Students will understand the meaning they provided past generations of people and how their message is carried into the modern world.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 242First Nations Values and Spiritual Beliefs3.00
Examines a broad range of First Nations religious beliefs as they relate to the various cultural values of First Nations in North America. Emphasis on the spiritual significance of First Nations ceremonies and their relationship to the environment. Traditional teachings of First Nations will be examined as they relate to the lifestyles of First Nations people historically and today.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
FREN 101Beginning French I3.00
Study of language fundamentals with emphasis on development of listening and speaking skills. Practice in reading and writing. Only for students with no previous French study.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
FREN 102Beginning French II3.00
Continuation of FREN 101. Appropriate for someone with up to two years of high school French.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FREN 201Intermediate French I3.00
Intensive oral practice; review of fundamentals of French; conversation; reading. Appropriate for someone with two or three years of high school French.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FREN 202Intermediate French II3.00
Continuation of FREN 201.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FREN 303History of Paris in French3.00
The history, culture/society, philosophy, and literature of France through the centuries will be viewed through the prism of Paris's national treasures: famous squares, monuments and museums. Students will travel to Paris and learn about Nortre Dame's architectural wonders, the legend of St. Denis, the sculptures on the iconic Arc de Triomphe, and much more. Cannot be taken concurrently with WLLC 203.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FYS 103First-Year Seminar-World Language,Culture and Philosophy3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 113First Year Seminar-World Lang, Culture, Non-Western3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 123First-Year Seminar-World Language, Culture and Philosophy, Diversity3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
GERM 101Beginning German I3.00
Study of language fundamentals with emphasis on development of listening and speaking skills. Practice in reading and writing. Only for students with no previous German study.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having no High School German; otherwise German placement test must be taken or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GERM 102Beginning German II3.00
Continuation of GERM 101.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GERM 101, appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GERM 201Intermediate German I3.00
Intensive oral practice; review of fundamentals of German; conversation; reading.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GERM 102, appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GERM 202Intermediate German II3.00
Contemporary German usage through the reading and oral discussion of various modern short stories. Practice in writing.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GERM 201, appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
JAPA 101Beginning Japanese I3.00
Study of language fundamentals with emphasis on development of listening and speaking skills. Practice with reading and writing. Japanese script (hiragana, katakana and kanji) is taught from the beginning of the course. Presumes no previous language study.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
MUSI 161Music and World Culture3.00
Survey of non-Western musical cultures, including ethnic origins of folk and traditional music in America. Required listening. Open to all students.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHIL 151Introduction To Philosophy3.00
How do we become wise? What does it mean to be a lover of wisdom? How can human beings have knowledge of reality? In this course, we ask the question "what is philosophy?" with a special concern for the relationship between knowledge (or wisdom) and reality. This will include a beginning look at some key canonical figures in the history of philosophy such as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, and Hegel. Next, we will consider the historical presence of European philosophy by reading several non-canonical movements in philosophy by reading several non-canonical movements in philosophy including: feminist , Latin American, and Japanese philosophy.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHIL 160Philosophy and Film3.00
In this course we will view films with philosophical themes and pair them with readings that help us to consider those themes more deeply. Readings will be at the introductory level; and films will include everything from the artsy to the absurd.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHIL 211Contemporary Moral Problems3.00
Are all acts inherently selfish? Should everyone follow the same moral laws? Do we need God to tell us how to behave? Why should we be good and what does that even mean? Should all living creatures be treated equally? In this course we will entertain questions like these as we apply moral theories to a selection of contemporary issues (for example, human rights, environmental ethics, the global sex trade, the death penalty). A key concern will be our ethical responsibilities in the diverse contemporary global theater.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHIL 212Critical Thinking3.00
Basic elements and common patterns of argument. Inductive and deductive modes of thought are explored with emphasis on the concepts and principles of correct reasoning. Designed to assist students to understand and evaluate ordinary arguments and to develop skills in constructing arguments in the spoken and written word. Cross-listed PHIL/PSYC 212.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHIL 262Introduction to Political Theory3.00
This course exposes students to some of the classic pieces in this field of political theory and teaches them how to work with theoretical and philosophical texts that continue to shape, inform, and challenge the analysis of current political phenomena today. Through these texts, the course introduces questions about the nature of human beings, the roots of government authority, the best regime, and the circumstances of legitimate revolution as well as ideals such as liberty, equality, rights, and justice. Cross-listed as PHIL/POLS 262.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
POLS 101Introduction to Comparative Politics3.00
The recent history of Afghanistan has highlighted the complexities of national and state building. This course explores these two terms and what they mean. Is there a single universal definition and a singular path to modernity or are there multiple definitions and pathways to modernity? The first part of the course will examine the various theories of development with this question in mind. The second part of the course will focus on one developing country. By concentrating on their development pattern we draw out some lessons about tensions and contradictions that accompany development.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 262Introduction to Political Theory3.00
This course exposes students to some of the classic pieces in this field of political theory and teaches them how to work with theoretical and philosophical texts that continue to shape, inform, and challenge the analysis of current political phenomena today. Through these texts, the course introduces questions about the nature of human beings, the roots of government authority, the best regime, and the circumstances of legitimate revolution as well as ideals such as liberty, equality, rights, and justice. Cross-listed as PHIL/POLS 262.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
POLS 265Contemporary Issues in Political Theory3.00
Introduces students to the origin and theoretical background of some of the central debates within political theory. Focus is on topics such as power and authority, nation-state in a global world, sovereignty and control, gender and identity and human rights. By analyzing and understanding some of the common underlying assumptions and beliefs about human nature, society, and state, we will learn about the forces that shape our economic, social and political systems today.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PSYC 212Critical Thinking3.00
Basic elements and common patterns of argument. Inductive and deductive modes of thought are explored with emphasis on the concepts and principles of correct reasoning. Designed to assist students to understand and evaluate ordinary arguments and to develop skills in constructing arguments in the spoken and written word. Cross-listed PHIL/PSYC 212.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SPAN 101Beginning Spanish I3.00
Study of language fundamentals with emphasis on listening, speaking, and reading skills. Practice in writing. Only for students with no previous Spanish study, or consent of instructor.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SPAN 102Beginning Spanish II3.00
Continuation of SPAN 101.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SPAN 101, or appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SPAN 201Intermediate Spanish I3.00
Review of grammar. Emphasis on oral skills, writing, and reading of Spanish.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SPAN 102, appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SPAN 202Intermediate Spanish II3.00
Continuation of SPAN 201.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SPAN 201, appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
WLLC 203History of Paris, Versailles and the Chateaux: The Presents(ce) of the Past3.00
The history, culture/society, philosophy, and literature of Paris through the centuries will be viewed through the prism of its national treasures: famous squares, monuments and museums. Students will learn about Nortre Dame's architectural wonders, the legend of St. Denis, the sculptures on the iconic Arc de Triomphe, and much more. Cannot be taken concurrently with FREN 303.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
WLLC 207An Exploration of the World of Spanish Speaking Cultures0.00 - 3.00
In this study abroad course the history, culture and folklore of the Spanish speaking world will be explored through a myriad of literary texts, music, and film (either in Spanish or translation). Students will also have the opportunity to interact directly in Spanish with other native speakers through a variety of activities woven into the course. During this course the students will have the opportunity to visit historic sites and museums to allow them to experience the culture firsthand. Reading, writing and oral work will be done in English and/or Spanish. Course may be repeated for credit with different study abroad experience. Prerequisite: pre-session meetings.
General Education Attributes:
HHE World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
HL: Humanities-LiteratureTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ENGL 211British Literature I3.00
Survey of masterpieces and transitional works to 1789.
General Education Attributes:
HL Humanities-Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGL 212British Literature II3.00
Survey of masterpieces and transitional works from 1789 to the present.
General Education Attributes:
HL Humanities-Literature
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 221American Literature I3.00
Survey of principal American writers from the Colonial Period through the mid-19th Century.
General Education Attributes:
HL Humanities-Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGL 222American Literature II3.00
Survey of principal American writers from the mid-19th century to the present.
General Education Attributes:
HL Humanities-Literature
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 228Multi-Ethnic American Literature3.00
Survey of a variety of multi-ethnic American literatures, including Native American, African-American, Hispanic, Latino/a, Asian American, and various European- American writings starting with the oral traditions up the 20th Century.
General Education Attributes:
HL Humanities-Literature
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 229Literature by Women3.00
Survey of British and American women's literature from the Middle Ages to the Contemporary Period. Women's literature across cultures, genres, and time periods.
General Education Attributes:
HL Humanities-Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ENGL 241World Literature I3.00
Survey of selected literary works in translation from the Ancient World through the mid-17th Century. Includes works from the Western and non-Western world.
General Education Attributes:
HL Humanities-Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGL 242World Literature II3.00
Survey of selected literary works in translation from the late 17th Century through the Contemporary Period. Includes works from the Western and non-Western world.
General Education Attributes:
HL Humanities-Literature
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FYS 102First-Year Seminar-Humanities Literature3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
HL Humanities-Literature
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 112First Year Seminar-Humanities Literature, Non Western3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
HL Humanities-Literature
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 122First Year Seminar-Humanities-Literature-Diversity3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
HL Humanities-Literature
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
 
HP: Health Promotion/Human PerformTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FYS 100First-Year Seminar-Health Promotion/Human Performance3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
HP Health Promotion/Human Perform
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 120First Year Seminar-Health Promotion/Human Performance, NW3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
HP Health Promotion/Human Perform
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
HHP 102Health and Wellness3.00
Basic knowledge and understanding of health and critical thinking that provides students with the opportunity to develop and implement a plan for reaching their optimal level of functioning physically, emotionally, socially, mentally, spiritually, environmentally and occupationally. Does not count toward a major or minor in Health and Human Performance. Note: Students with medical restrictions should contact the lab coordinator of HHP 102 before the first lab session. Physical Education majors and minors must earn a grade of C or better in HHP 102.
General Education Attributes:
HP Health Promotion/Human Perform
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
MC: Math/Computer ScienceTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
CSCI 101Introduction to Computer Science3.00
A first course in computer science providing a survey of current topics as well as core programming and related problems solving skills. Satisfies the mathematics requirement for General Education. MATH 095 is recommended for taking this course.
General Education Attributes:
MC Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is the Mathematics Placement Test, or successful completion of MATH 095 (recommended).
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CSCI 201Introduction to Programming3.00
A first programming course for students with a serious interest in computing. Topics include: formal languages; data types and variables; control structures; primitive and reference data types; methods and modular programming; introduction to abstract data types and classes; simple algorithms; and programming conventions and style. Satisfies the mathematics requirement for General Education. MATH 102 is recommended.
General Education Attributes:
MC Math/Computer Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
FYS 110First-Year Seminar-Math Computer Science3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
MC Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
MATH 112Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics3.00
A liberal arts mathematics course presenting mathematics as a tool used by a wide range of professionals in modern society. Real-life examples are used to promote understanding of mathematics and its relationship to other areas of study. Mathematical problem solving is shown to influence everything from the success of savvy entrepreneurs to the fairness of voting practices. Examples such as the Traveling Salesman Problem and Arrow's Impossibility Theorem are taken from management science, statistics, social science and computer science. Satisfies the Mathematics requirement for general education. Students enrolling in MATH 112 should have an acceptable score on the Mathematics Placement Test or have completed an appropriate remedial course. MATH 095 is recommended.
General Education Attributes:
MC Math/Computer Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 115Precalculus5.00
Covers the algebra and trigonometry required for Calculus and Analytic Geometry. Topics include review of intermediate algebra; composite and inverse functions; polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, identities, and equations; the binomial theorem; fundamentals of analytic geometry; and the conic sections.
General Education Attributes:
MC Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MATH 102 with a grade of C- or better, or acceptable math placement test score.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 130Elementary Statistics4.00
Introductory course for students of all disciplines. Includes descriptive statistics, the binomial and normal distributions, confidence intervals, linear regression, correlation, the t-distribution, the Chi-square distribution, nonparametric tests of statistical inference, and understanding statistics in many different fields. Problems are taken from various fields dependent on statistical decision making.
General Education Attributes:
MC Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed MATH 095 with a grade of C- or better or an acceptable score in the math placement test.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 151Calculus for Business, Life, and Social Sciences3.00
A short course in calculus including concepts and problem-solving techniques for students in business, economics, biology and the social sciences. Topics include algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions; derivatives, and optimization problems; partial derivatives and Lagrange multipliers as time permits. Prerequisite: acceptable score on the Mathematics Placement Test or completion of MATH 102 with a grade of at least C-.
General Education Attributes:
MC Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 102 with a grade of C- or better, or acceptable math placement test score is prerequisite for enrolling in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 230Foundations of Mathematics for Elementary Education3.00
A course in mathematical concepts designed to meet the mathematical needs of students in the Elementary Education program. Topics include: sets and set operations; numeration systems; number systems and their arithmetic; concepts of algebra; fundamentals of two- and three-dimensional geometry; and an introduction to probability and statistics.
General Education Attributes:
MC Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 102 with a grade of C- or better is prerequisite for taking this class.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 240Calculus and Analytic Geometry I4.00
A first course in the fundamentals of calculus. Topics include: real numbers; functions; limits; continuity; derivatives, integrals; and applications. Prerequisite: acceptable score on the Mathematics Placement Test or completion of MATH 115 with a grade of at least C- or equivalent.
General Education Attributes:
MC Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
MATH240 prerequisite
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
NS: Natural Science-EnvironmentalTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
BIOL 100Environmental Science2.00
Basic course in human ecology for students with limited training in science. Emphasizes environmental problems related to human activity in the modern world. Meets the General Education environmental science requirement and meets the Wisconsin Teaching Certification Requirement for Environmental Science. Does not count toward the Biology major. No prerequisite. (Lecture two hours.)
General Education Attributes:
NS Natural Science-Environmental
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CHEM 100Our Chemical Environment2.00
Introduces the concepts of chemistry into the interpretation of chemical effects on the environment. Prerequisite: None. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science (environmental component). Credits cannot be counted toward a Chemistry major or minor.
General Education Attributes:
NS Natural Science-Environmental
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHEM 101Elements & The Environment3.00
Introduction to basic concepts of chemistry and their importance in gaining a better understanding and appreciation of our environment. Many topics of current environmental concern will be discussed. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science (environmental component). Credits cannot be counted toward a chemistry major or minor. Students cannot earn credit for both CHEM 100 and 101.
General Education Attributes:
NS Natural Science-Environmental
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FYS 106First-Year Seminar-Science/Environmental3.00
First- Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
NS Natural Science-Environmental
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
GEOL 130Environmental Geology4.00
An investigation of how human activities affect and are affected by physical Earth processes. Topics include: an overview of Earth's development and internal processes such as plate tectonics, minerals and rocks, surface processes, the use of natural resources, waste disposal and pollution, global climate and related topics. (Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours) Fall Semester, Distance Learning Center course and Spring Semester course is offered on campus.
General Education Attributes:
NS Natural Science-Environmental
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
NS5: Natural Science with LabTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
BIOL 111Plants and People4.00
(P) Provides an avenue to investigate botanical marvels that have influenced our past and will change our future. Designed to develop and sustain student interests in plants, regardless of prior background or knowledge. Scientific topics such as morphology, physiology, and ecology are integrated with everyday aspects of plants, including commercial uses, agriculture, nutrition, human health, and horticulture. Laboratory includes hands-on experiments in applied botany that utilize the University greenhouse. Students come away with plants to keep and activities to be used in public school classrooms. No prerequisite. Does not count towards the Biology major, but counts towards the plant requirement for Secondary Education certification. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
Typically Offered:
Every Fall and Odd Spring Term
BIOL 115Human Biology4.00
General education course investigating the structure and function of the human body as related to areas of health and disease. Designed to meet the General Education requirement for laboratory science. Does not count toward the Biology major. Not open to those having taken BIOL 270, or 280. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours).
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BIOL 123Concepts In Biology4.00
Introduction to important biological concepts including chemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, plant and animal form and function, and ecology. Laboratory exercises are integrated with lectures and designed to be experimental and inquiry driven. Fulfills the General Education requirement for laboratory science. Recommended for Elementary Education majors. Does not count toward the Biology major. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BIOL 130Principles of Biology I4.00
Introduction to important principles of chemistry, cellular, molecular, and evolutionary biology, and the diversity of life. Laboratory experiments are inquiry driven. Intended as the first of a two-course sequence for biology majors, and students with a strong interest in the life sciences. Fulfills the General Education laboratory science requirement. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CHEM 102Chemistry of Everyday Phenomena4.00
Explores the chemistry of foods, drugs, household chemicals, personal hygiene products, agricultural chemicals, materials and other types of chemistry relevant to the student. Current chemistry topics in the popular press will be critically examined. Topics not usually addressed in other science general education courses will be presented. A small part of the course will be devoted to elementary statistics (evaluation, not calculation) to enable students to understand science and medicine as it is commonly reported. An important but minor part of the course involves discussion of the role of research in technology development and standard of living, and the impact of the chemical industry on the national and world economies. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science (laboratory component). Credits cannot be counted toward a Chemistry major or minor. Prerequisite: None. (Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory.)
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
CHEM 105General Chemistry I5.00
Introduction to physical and chemical properties of the elements, chemical reactions, gas laws, chemical nomenclature, structure of atoms, chemical bonding, and solutions. (Four lectures and one three-hour laboratory.)
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 107First-Year Seminar-Science/Lab4.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
GEOL 110The Dynamic Earth4.00
An introductory science class that emphasizes the foundational principles and concepts of geology. Topics include: minerals, rocks, Earth's internal structure, plate tectonics, geologic structures, the rock cycle. Climate change, glaciers, groundwater, geologic structures, the rock cycle, climate change, glaciers, groundwater, geologic resources and earthquakes. One weekend field trip. (lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours).
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
GEOL 130Environmental Geology4.00
An investigation of how human activities affect and are affected by physical Earth processes. Topics include: an overview of Earth's development and internal processes such as plate tectonics, minerals and rocks, surface processes, the use of natural resources, waste disposal and pollution, global climate and related topics. (Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours) Fall Semester, Distance Learning Center course and Spring Semester course is offered on campus.
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHYS 100Astronomy4.00
Includes a brief history of astronomy, the study of the motions and structures of the Earth, the moon, the sun, planets, stars and galaxies and consideration of cosmological theories. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science laboratory class.
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHYS 107Algebra-Based Physics I4.00
Designed for students majoring in the humanities, education, medical sciences, or biological sciences. Not open to students with a major in Chemistry or Mathematics. Prerequisite: high school algebra. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science laboratory class.
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHYS 160Physical Science4.00
Laboratory-oriented course covering the basic concepts of physics and chemistry. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Sciences laboratory class, recommended for elementary education majors. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHYS 201Calculus-Based Physics I5.00
Mechanics and heat. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science laboratory class. (Lecture four hours, laboratory two hours.)
General Education Attributes:
NS5 Natural Science with Lab
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for this course is successful completion of MATH 240.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
 
NW: Non-WesternTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ANTH 306African Archeology3.00
Introduces the main concepts of archaeological study of African excavations, ruins, material objects, and dating methods and examines how historians move from this scientific evidence to historical interpretations. Examples are drawn from many African regions and sites like Kerma, Meroe, Mapungubwe, Great Zimbabwe, Igbo Ukwu, Akan Gold weights or Yoruba carved doors and may change from year to year. Many films. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST 306.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ANTH 315Cultural Anthropology3.00
Detailed study of the human condition by focusing on a selection of specific cultures. Reading ,film, lecture, and discussed-based.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ANTH 320Environmental Anthropology3.00
Exploration of the impact of environmental issues on indigenous and Third World cultures. Such issues as how humans have adapted physically to differing environments as well as how environmental problems affect cultural survival. Reading, discussion and lecture course. Some student research required. Recommended for any student with an interest in environmental issues on a global level.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
ANTH 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica such as Nahua/Aztec, Zapotec and Mayan. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 4.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 224Visual Arts in Non-Western Societies3.00
Study of visual arts in non-western societies including North American Indian/Native American; Mesoamerican; Oceania/Pacific Islands, Asian, and African cultures.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 331Black Art3.00
Topics: African American Art and African Art - Alternate every other fall. A survey of art created by people of African descent. Also discussed are some influences of Islam, Western Europe, and the Caribbean regions. Repeatable up to six credits.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHIN 101Beginning Chinese I3.00
Study of language fundamentals with emphasis on development of listening and speaking skills. Practice with reading and writing. Chinese characters are taught and used. Presumes no previous language study.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHIN 102Beginning Chinese II3.00
Continuation of CHIN 101. This course is appropriate for someone with up to two years of high school Chinese.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of Chinese 101 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CHIN 201Intermediate Chinese3.00
Continuation of CHIN 102. Appropriate for someone with up to two years of high school Chinese. This third semester course continues building on the student's previous Chinese knowledge by introducing new vocabulary, characters, grammar, and usage. Students who complete this course should be able to initiate discussion on topics of daily life, understand more complicated sentences, and write short compositions. Mandarin pronunciation is taught.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of Chinese 102 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHIN 202Intermediate Chinese II3.00
Appropriate for someone with two or more years of high school Chinese. Introduces additional characters with more complicated dialogue and sentence patterns with continued practice of Mandarin pronunciation. Students read and discuss supplemental materials including Chinese proverbs and folk stories.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of Chinese 202 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 241World Literature I3.00
Survey of selected literary works in translation from the Ancient World through the mid-17th Century. Includes works from the Western and non-Western world.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGL 242World Literature II3.00
Survey of selected literary works in translation from the late 17th Century through the Contemporary Period. Includes works from the Western and non-Western world.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica such as Nahua/Aztec, Zapotec and Mayan. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 4.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FYS 111First Year Seminar-Humanities-History, Non-Western3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 112First Year Seminar-Humanities Literature, Non Western3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 113First Year Seminar-World Lang, Culture, Non-Western3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 114First Year Seminar-Social Sciences,Non Western3.00
First-year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 115First-Year Seminar-Communicating Arts, Non Western3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 118First Year Seminar-FA-Art Hist,Criticism and Appreciation and Non-Western3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 119First-Year Seminar-Aesthetic Experience-Non Western3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 120First Year Seminar-Health Promotion/Human Performance, NW3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
GEOG 100World Regional Geography3.00
Develops basic factual knowledge and awareness of the physical and cultural features of the world environment. Explores regional and world scale patterns of resources, climate, applied technology and trade, political alignments, and other aspects of the current world. All world political units are analyzed from a regional perspective. Students gain significant knowledge of world spatial relationships.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOG 102Cultural Geography3.00
Explores the influence of culture on perceptions, decisions, and interpersonal relations on both planetary and local scales of life. A broad range of cultural topics are considered, including the origins of culture, human development, political and social organization, religions and languages, and evolving human landscapes. Prepares students to be well-informed citizens of our increasingly interconnected global community.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 160Arab Identities3.00
Explores the construction of Arab identities through language, culture, the spread of Islam and historical events: the birth of Islam, the colonial experience, Arab nationalism, Pan Arabism, the Palestinian conflict. Examines forces that brought Arabs together and those that have been divisive: social class, religions and sects, ethnicities in the Lebanese Civil War and Iraqi conflicts. Films. No prior knowledge needed. Code 6. RE.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 161African Peoples and Issues3.00
Introductory course on modern Africa which covers major historical trends. Particularly useful for future high school teachers. Covers topics like the slave trade, the impact of colonialism, nationalist resistance movements, African aspirations at independence and political unity and disunity. Many films are shown and all texts are written by Africans, including autobiography, drama and novels. Code 3.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
HIST 219History of Premodern East Asia3.00
Examination of “premodern” East Asia with emphasis on: East Asian philosophical and spiritual traditions and how these traditions affected the development of East Asian civilizations; the contribution East Asia played in the development of European and world history; and to challenge Euro-centric perspectives that often view East Asia civilization as monolithic, static, and backward. Some particular themes include how Confucianism created a self-regulated society, how Chinese civilization developed and implemented a democratic ethos in government, Genghis Khan and the making of the modern world, the great treasure fleets of the Ming Dynasty, and Japanese samurai (warrior) culture. Course uses several East Asian films and documentaries as a means to understand and analyze the past through a film medium. Course centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essay. Code 5.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 220History of Modern Asia3.00
Examination of Asia in the modern period (1600 to present). Requires no prior knowledge of the region. Emphasizes how the rise of the West affected the historical development of Asia and how Asia responded to Western dominance. Themes include: why the powerful Chinese tributary system failed to meet the challenge of Western colonialism and conversely, how Japan became the first Asian nation to utilize western-style gunboat diplomacy to expand its empire; why race played a significant role in the Asian Pacific Theater during World War II; the communist revolutions throughout Asia; and how Southeast Asian countries have struggled for national sovereignty since the Cold War. Uses several Asian films and documentaries as a means to understand and analyze the past through a film medium. Centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essays. Code 5.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 225Latin America Since Independence3.00
Introduction to major themes and issues in modern Latin American history. Focus is on issues of development and underdevelopment. Students consider various theories of underdevelopment and weigh their relative merits using Latin America as a case study. Code 4.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 240Africa In Early Times3.00
How do we know early African history? Looks at archaeology in South Africa, oral traditions in Mali, written documents in West and East Africa, ethnography of the East African coast and a fictional treatment of the slave trade between Dahomey and Brazil. Many films. Code 3.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 241Africa In Modern Times3.00
A topics course that looks at modern trends in African history, including the slave trade, colonialism, independence movements, challenges of national unity and economic and social progress. Several films. Code 3.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 281The Muslim World3.00
Survey-level course introduces students to a variety of topics about the Muslim world from multidisciplinary perspectives. The time and life of the prophet Muhammad, the rise of great Islamic empires, Islam and women, the spread of Islam in America and the explosion of Islamic resurgence and extremism are all topics for consideration. Code 6.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
HIST 306African Archeology3.00
Introduces the main concepts of archaeological study of African excavations, ruins, material objects, and dating methods and examines how historians move from this scientific evidence to historical interpretations. Examples are drawn from many African regions and sites like Kerma, Meroe, Mapungubwe, Great Zimbabwe, Igbo Ukwu, Akan Gold weights or Yoruba carved doors and may change from year to year. Many films. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST 306.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica such as Nahua/Aztec, Zapotec and Mayan. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 4.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 369The Shadow Of Mexican Revolution3.00
The revolution of 1910-1920 was the central event of modern Mexican history. Examines the revolution and its legacy with particular emphasis upon the ways in which the culture, politics, and society of contemporary Mexico have evolved in the revolution's shadow. Code 4.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
HIST 371The Modern Middle East3.00
Topics in Middle East history such as the Ottoman Empire, the Armenian genocide, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the Iranian revolution and the Gulf conflicts. Several films. Code 6.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 382East Asia and U.S. Interactions in Historical Context3.00
Examines East Asian (including Southeast Asia) and U.S. interactions at multiple levels (state-to-state, social, cultural and economic). Begins with the rise of Western imperialism in Asia in the mid-19th Century, to examining the major East Asia-U.S. wars in East Asia in the 20th Century (Philippines, Japan, China, Korea, and Vietnam), the decision to use atomic bombs against Japan, and concluding with East Asia's development as a major economic power. Uses several East Asian films and documentaries as a means to understand and analyze the past through a film medium. Centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essays. Codes 1 or 5.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 383The History of Modern Korea3.00
This course examines the historical causes for North and South Korea to develop into two extremely different countries on the world stage: South Korea, becoming the most technologically networked country in the world, and North Korea becoming America's "axis of evil." This course will present a general overview of the latter half of the Chosen Dynasty (1700) to the present focusing on topics such as peasant land and labor disputes, neo-Confucian statecraft reform debates, gunboat diplomacy, imperialist and nationalist movements, national division and Cold War ideologies, South Korean democracy movements and the global phenomenon of Hallyu media products. Some prevalent themes in this course will be Orientalism, modernity, postcolonial identities, class, gender, and transregional identity. We will be using Korean literature, (documentary and fictional) film and visual media to understand and analyze the past through a variety of mediums. This course centers on active-dynamic learning such as oral presentation, peer evaluation, student facilitated discussion, critical reading reflection, and analytical essays. Code 5, RE, G.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 384History of Modern China3.00
Examines how China, as one of the most powerful, wealthy, and technologically advanced premodern civilizations, buckled under Western imperialism and encountered a 20th Century history filled with peasant revolts, western modernization reforms, fractious nationalist movements, and revolution. Themes include: an examination of Europe's rising power in the East, the Opium Wars, Qing Dynasty's isolation policies and eventual collapse, why the Communists, under Mao Zedong, won the civil war, how China's communist and Cold War era affected the Chinese diaspora. Code 5.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
HIST 385History Of Modern Japan3.00
Examines how Japan emerged from a feudal society to a modernized country that challenged Western domination in several arenas (militarily, economically, etc.) Focuses on four key questions: How did Tokugawa feudalism ironically spur on Japan’s imperialism and modernization? Why was race/racism central to the Asian Pacific War/World War II? How did Japan emerge as an economic and technological superpower after its total defeat in World War II? And, ho w have the economic bubble and the Asian Debt Crisis affected contemporary Japanese society? Themes include: the role of warrior and peasant communities in feudal Japan, the rise of a strong centralized state and Japanese modernization reform movements, the global theatre of W.W.II war trials, and Japan's remarkable economic development. Uses several East Asian films and documentaries as a means to understand and analyze the past through a film medium. Centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essays. Code 5.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
HIST 393Topics in Modern Southeast Asia3.00
This course focuses on one or two major themes in Southeast Asian history through both a regional lens as well as through national histories of Burma/Myanmar, the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Cambodia and Vietnam. Some of the theses include European colonization and the indigenous response; the shaping of a modern colonial plural society; the effects of economic transformation; anti-colonialism and nationalism, decolonization, the Cold War and nation-building; race and racism; the history of marginalized and everyday groups; women and gender in the construction of social and political identities; and so on. Code 5; Asian History.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 403African Voices on Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, history, anthropology and fiction about gender issues in Africa. Topics vary from year to year and may include the legacy of slavery and race prejudice, health and gender, the impact of colonialism, environmental causes, African gender identities, the impact of war, and women as peacemakers. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 403. Code 3, G.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
HIST 404Arab Voices on Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, fiction, history and ethnography about gender issues in the Arab World. Topics vary from year to year and may include topics like women and nationalism, progress through education and ideology, the Arab feminist movement, gender identities in Arab societies, gender in Islam. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 404. Code 6, G.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
MUSI 161Music and World Culture3.00
Survey of non-Western musical cultures, including ethnic origins of folk and traditional music in America. Required listening. Open to all students.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHIL 175Philosophy Of Religion3.00
Examination of the religious dimension of human experience. Topics include the nature of religion as an aspect of human experience, an introductory study of the major religious traditions (Buddhism, Hinduism, Christianity and others), and traditional philosophical problems, such as the existence of God, the problem of evil, and the possibility of immortality.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 101Introduction to Comparative Politics3.00
The recent history of Afghanistan has highlighted the complexities of national and state building. This course explores these two terms and what they mean. Is there a single universal definition and a singular path to modernity or are there multiple definitions and pathways to modernity? The first part of the course will examine the various theories of development with this question in mind. The second part of the course will focus on one developing country. By concentrating on their development pattern we draw out some lessons about tensions and contradictions that accompany development.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SOCI 300Chinese Societies3.00
Applies basic sociological concepts and theories to understand Chinese societies in different historical and spatial contexts. Compares and contrasts institutions and systems of meaning between and within these societies and concludes with social questions in contemporary Chinese societies. Required for SOCI 301 and ANTH 301 Study Abroad China Workshop.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101 or ANTH 101.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
WST 403African Voices on Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, history, anthropology and fiction about gender issues in Africa. Topics vary from year to year and may include the legacy of slavery and race prejudice, health and gender, the impact of colonialism, environmental causes, African gender identities, the impact of war, and women as peacemakers. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 403. Code 3, G.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
WST 404Arab Voices on Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, fiction, history and ethnography about gender issues in the Arab World. Topics vary from year to year and may include topics like women and nationalism, progress through education and ideology, the Arab feminist movement, gender identities in Arab societies, gender in Islam. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 404. Code 6, G.
General Education Attributes:
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
 
SS: Social SciencesTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ANTH 101The Human Experience3.00
Introduction to the principles, concepts and methods of cultural anthropology. Consideration of the ways in which cultural anthropology contributes to the understanding of human diversity.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ANTH 205Language, Culture, and Society3.00
What is language? Is animal communication language? How are human beings adapted to learn language, and does this vary from culture to culture? Does the language you speak affect the way you think and look at the world? How do gender, region, class, ethnicity, and other identities influence how people speak, and vice versa? What is at stake in debates over official languages and bilingual education? How is language used to control and disadvantage people, and can anything be done about it? Using the approaches of linguistic anthropology and sociolinguistics, this course explores language as an essential and powerful part of human culture and interaction.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CJUS 106Human Behavior and Its Control3.00
Multidisciplinary analysis of individual, community and government responses to harmful conduct; an examination of criminal, juvenile, military, and civil justice as well as informal and personal control systems; an inquiry into the use of coercion to promote conformity or lessen injurious behavior; special attention given to decisions, processes and institutions which respond to acts of criminality and delinquency.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 235Economics in Society3.00
General introductory course highlighting economic and social issues facing society. In addition to covering traditional issues such as markets and prices, government economic management and international trade, it also introduces economic content into the analysis of problems such as poverty and discrimination, pollution control, and provision of government services. Primarily oriented toward students outside business and economics, including social work, sociology, history, political science, education and the natural sciences.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 250Principles Of Microeconomics3.00
The role of households, firms, and industries in the use of resources. Survey of consumption, production, markets, price determination, and industrial organization including competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly. Policy issues.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 251Principles Of Macroeconomics3.00
Fundamentals of social organization and issues in the allocation of resources to goods and services. Survey of national income accounts, employment theory, economic growth, fiscal and monetary policy, money and banking, and international trade payments. Policy issues.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
FNS 151Introduction to Tribal Administration3.00
Introduction to the basics of First Nations law and tribal governments, and how federal Indian policy has affected development of tribal governments that exist today. Cross-listed as POLS 151.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 104First-Year Seminar-Social Sciences3.00
First Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
FYS 114First Year Seminar-Social Sciences,Non Western3.00
First-year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 124First-Year Seminar-Social Sciences, Diversity3.00
First-Year Seminar
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to SOAR students only.
GEOG 100World Regional Geography3.00
Develops basic factual knowledge and awareness of the physical and cultural features of the world environment. Explores regional and world scale patterns of resources, climate, applied technology and trade, political alignments, and other aspects of the current world. All world political units are analyzed from a regional perspective. Students gain significant knowledge of world spatial relationships.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOG 102Cultural Geography3.00
Explores the influence of culture on perceptions, decisions, and interpersonal relations on both planetary and local scales of life. A broad range of cultural topics are considered, including the origins of culture, human development, political and social organization, religions and languages, and evolving human landscapes. Prepares students to be well-informed citizens of our increasingly interconnected global community.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 115Law and Human Behavior3.00
Provides a general framework of knowledge, ideas and thought -- mainstream and critical -- regarding the assumptions, structures, actors, operation, intentions and outcomes of the American legal system. Interdisciplinary liberal arts course exploring the effect of law on and in our society from past, present and future perspectives. Law now pervades most of what we think, do and believe in the United States. This course will help illuminate how and why that happens.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
LSTU 261Contemporary Issues in Law and Society3.00
Explores controversies arising within or impinging on the American legal system. Research, discussion and debate on 20 pressing issues of contemporary significance in American law. Students consider the differential impact of issues on various disempowered and minority groups in the United States and around the world. Fulfills General Education Social Science-Contemporary Society category.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 100Introduction to Political Science3.00
Politics is often perceived as cynical and subsidiary from the normative interaction of society. But what is politics? What is the role of politics in society? What is the relationship between politics and government? To what extent does politics influence human relations and the ways in which government and its institutions function? The course will examine these questions by focusing on one topic each semester. Each of these topics--such as the concept of borders, citizenship, globalization, immigration, etc.--represents a central debate in politics, and introduces some of the current concerns in our world today.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
POLS 150American National Government3.00
Theory and practice of American national government; the Constitution as an instrument of change through interpretation and action by the executive, legislative and judicial branches as well as through the development of informal custom and usage.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
POLS 230U.S. National,State and Local Government3.00
Structure of American government on the national, state and local levels; federalism; behavior patterns of public officials; modes of citizen participation. Meets DPI requirements. Not open to Political Science majors.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
POLS 260Contemporary Issues in American Politics3.00
Same-sex marriage, welfare reform, stem cell research, urban poverty, the legalization of medical marijuana...these and other contemporary issues incite tremendous passion among the public, leading to policy debates, disputes over the role of government in American society and controversial social policy. This course goes beyond the surface-level debates and explores the political and social context of contemporary political controversies as well as the ramifications of government policies.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
POLS 263Contemporary Issues in World Politics3.00
Examines issues such as nationalism, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, war on drugs, land mines, diplomacy, global poverty, globalization, regionalization, regional development, European Union, global market, human rights, women's rights, right of refugees, minority rights, rise of religious fundamentalism, population, consumption, citizenship, global warning, ozone layer, biodiversity, rain forests, and conservation. Deals with basic understanding of the nature and scope of global problems and emphasizes the legal, political, economic, social and moral dimensions of these issues.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
PSYC 101Introduction To Psychology3.00
Introduction to the scientific study of psychology covering major areas of study within the discipline, including biological bases of behavior, learning and conditioning, memory and cognition, motivation and emotion, social and cultural influences on behavior and attitudes, personality, health psychology, and mental illness. Select sections qualify as an Academic Service-Learning Course (see Academic Service-Learning for more details).
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SOCI 101Introduction to Sociology3.00
General introduction to the study of human relationships, group aspects of behavior and social institutions. Considers basic concepts and theories. Meets Wisconsin certification requirements for cooperative marketing and consumer's cooperatives.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SOCI 200Social Problems3.00
Critical survey of social institutions and social processes which conflict with or contradict human interests. Contemporary social issues (crime, inequality, economic and ecological crisis) are analyzed from a critical rather than utilitarian viewpoint.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SOCI 201Global Social Problems3.00
Explores and analyzes selected contemporary social issues relevant to the global community from a historical and sociological perspective. In the course of the investigation, students cultivate empathetic imagination about peoples unlike "us," learn basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and develop reflective and critical thinking skills.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SOCI 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/WST 210.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SOCI 273Race and Ethnicity3.00
Examines the social production of racial and ethnic categories as well as the practices that enact these categories. After examining the representation of these categories as "natural," the course uses local and global evidence to investigate the institutional and representational processes that historically create and modify race and ethnicity.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
WST 150Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies3.00
Focuses on how we experience gender, particularly women's experiences, and how we can work toward gender equity. Students encounter diverse voices and perspectives, including those of gay, lesbian, bisexual, heterosexual, transgender, and intersex people. Discussion, small-group work, readings, films, and a hands-on project
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
WST 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/WST 210.
General Education Attributes:
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms

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