Wisconsin's Public Liberal Arts College

Stereotype Threat in the Classroom


Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning

Stereotype Threat in the Classroom

All Faculty and Staff are invited to attend an on-line symposium/webinar on

Stereotype Threat and Microaggressions
 in the College Classroom

to be shown on Thursday, February 13, 2014 from 3:00 until 4:00 p.m.
in the CETL Seminar Room - Swenson Hall Room2074.

In this workshop, Staussa Ervin and Ticily Medley review the research on the concept of stereotype threat and how it affects the performance of minority students in the college classroom. The session also covers the unintentional invalidation of minority students by well-meaning faculty by discussing the concepts of microaggressions, microinsults, andmicroinvalidations. It concludes with practical strategies to help reduce the probability of unintentional hostility in the classroom.This TLC Symposium presentation is provided by Worth Publishers.

STEREOTYPE THREAT AND MICROAGGRESSIONS IN THE COLLEGE CLASSROOM will help you: 
*  Understand stereotype threat in the classroom
*  Identify microaggressions in the classroom 
*  Learn ways to avoid microaggressions in the classroom

ABOUT THE PRESENTERS:

 Staussa ErvinStaussa Ervin, EdD, is an Assistant Professor of Psychology in her eleventh year at Tarrant County College-South Campus in Fort Worth, Texas. She teaches General Psychology and the Psychology of Adjustment. She also works as a Licensed Professional Counselor specializing in Black/African American clients. Her research interests include global mental health and mindfulness.

Ticily Medley Ticily Medley, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Psychology in her eighth year at Tarrant County College-South Campus in Fort Worth, Texas. She teaches psychology courses such as Human Sexuality and Transition to College Success courses. She also works as a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist specializing in minority sexual identities. Her research interests include sexuality, cultural identification and minority college student success.

 


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