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EXSITE! Transaction based surveys


Continuous Improvement and Planning Team

EXSITE! Transaction based surveys

A transaction-based or exit survey is one where stakeholders are asked their opinion of the service immediately after they have received it, using stakeholder comment cards or other simple tools to measure satisfaction.  They provide the easiest, cheapest and most direct means of measuring stakeholder satisfaction.  They can give fresh, unfiltered feedback that allows you to promptly rectify any problems.  There are drawbacks, though.  Not everyone will complete them, so you'll only hear from stakeholders who are motivated to respond.  They focus on the stakeholder's most recent service encounter, not their overall experience.  Unless you use a structured approach, the feedback will be similarly unstructured – there will simply be a steady stream of comments.

Many organizations use transaction surveys every day.  Others have set periods for using comment cards, where, say, for every six-month period, their services are subjected to a concentrated period of external scrutiny for several weeks, and the results are aggregated and reported.  Some organizations have a 'polling day', where all stakeholders on that day are asked to provide written feedback.  A drawback of this is that people will often be on their best behavior on that day, so the feedback can be biased.

Examples of transaction-based surveys are:

  • Stakeholder comment cards – handout cards that stakeholders are asked to respond to and leave in a collection box. Questions could be as simple as: ''What did we do well today?', 'What could we do better?'
  • Other useful questions, allowing some quantitative measurement, might be:

Survey question sample

A variation on this theme is a simple rating tool, which asks stakeholders to merely indicate their level of satisfaction.  This could be in the form of five piles of cards, each pile a different number (from one to five, where 1 = Extremely Satisfied and 5 = Extremely Dissatisfied), where each stakeholder simply selects the one that best represents their experience and drops it in a box.  This provides a quantitative measure of stakeholder satisfaction without any further information that allows you the ability to diagnose possible problems.

Stakeholder Comment cards can only tackle a few service issues, and are limited to the services delivered in that transaction.  They don't always lend themselves to aggregation of data, unless people are asked closed questions on standard dimensions.

Questionnaires–where stakeholders are asked a series of questions about their service experience, concentrating on the most important service elements.  These can also ask for biographical data, allowing you to explore links between demographic factors, area usage and stakeholder satisfaction.  Keep them relatively short, as stakeholders will not be motivated to stay on for extended period completing a lengthy questionnaire.

This sort of tool could have standard questions where you want to track your performance over time, and questions that might be specific to a particular planned or recently introduced initiative.

An example might be:

Survey question sample

  

These items could also be worded as statements, to which the stakeholder is asked to respond, as follows:


The staff were helpful

Strongly agree

1

Agree


2

Neither agree or disagree

3

Disagree


4

Strongly disagree


5

 

I was able to access the services quickly

Strongly agree


1

Agree


2

Neither agree or disagree

3

Disagree


4

Strongly disagree


5

 

Adapted from 2004 Monash University ABN 12 377 614 012  Last updated: 23 May 2005 – Maintained by cheq@adm.monash.edu.au


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