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Mary Lee-Nichols featured in Harvard Educational Review

Posted on Dec 19, 2013
Harvard Educational Review honors UW-Superior faculty member.
click to enlarge
Mary Lee-Nichols showcasing the Fall Harvard Educational Review story.

Mary Lee-Nichols showcasing the Fall Harvard Educational Review story.

UW-Superior assistant professor Mary E. Lee-Nichols was published in the Harvard Educational Review. The article, "McIntosh as Synecdoche: How Teacher Education's Focus on White Privilege Undermines Antiracism" appears in the Fall 2013 issue as the lead story.

"I am very proud of this work and proud to have UW-Superior listed as my institution!" Mary E. Lee-Nichols explained.

She is Ph.D. assistant professor of Teacher Education in the Department of Educational Leadership. She with several colleagues from around the country collaborated on the Harvard Educational Review story.

1.Fall 2013 Issue »

McIntosh as Synecdoche:

How Teacher Education's Focus on White Privilege Undermines Antiracism

Timothy J. Lensmire, Shannon K. McManimon, Jessica Dockter Tierney, Mary E. Lee-Nichols, Zachary A. Casey, Audrey Lensmire, and Bryan M. Davis

In this article, members of the Midwest Critical Whiteness Collective argue that Peggy McIntosh's seminal "knapsack" article acts as a synecdoche, or as a stand-in, for all the antiracist work to be done in teacher education and that this limits our understanding and possibilities for action. The authors develop this argument by questioning the lack of critique of McIntosh's 1988 classic "invisible knapsack" article and sharing two narratives by members of their collective that illustrate problems with both the acceptance and the rejection of McIntosh's conception of white privilege. This discussion illuminates how white privilege pedagogy demands confession and how confession is a dead end for antiracist action. The authors also explore how McIntosh's ideas can lead to dangerous misreadings of student resistance. Acknowledging the initial fruitfulness of McIntosh's ideas, it is time for us to move to more complex treatments of working with white people on questions of race, white supremacy, and antiracism.

Click here to access this article.

News Contact: Tom Hansen | 715-394-8260 | thansen7{atuws}
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