kjaspers

Kristen Jasperson

I remember when I was a student and my advisor was so helpful. I never left there with questions and I always knew my next step. I wanted to be like that as an advisor.”
kjaspers

For many, one of the most appealing aspect of online learning is the ability to set your own schedule. Being able to continue your education without sacrificing work or family obligations can make the difference in failure or success.

Yet just because online students can take their courses on their own schedule, it doesn’t mean that they are without many of the services available to on-campus students. At UW-Superior, online students have access to a variety of campus resources and services such as the Jim Dan Hill Library, the Writing Center and Career Services. Another great resource for online students is the Center for Academic Advising.

Available to help students select a major, register for classes or just get pointed in the right direction for their academic journey, Center for Academic Advising Advisors begin working with students from the moment they are admitted to the university.

As a former UW-Superior student, Kristen Jasperson knows exactly what that experience was like. Now working as an Associate Academic Advisor in the Center for Academic Advising, she’s able to help students answer many of the same questions she had as a student.

“I remember when I was a student and my advisor was so helpful,” she said. “I never left there with questions and I always knew my next step. I wanted to be like that as an advisor.”

Meeting with an advisor requires little more than scheduling a time to talk, whether that be over the phone or in person.

“I like to get some background both as a person and educational to see where they are at with their degree process,” said Jasperson, who assists both online and on-campus students. “Then it’s going through their E-Hive and walking them through the system. When students understand the system, that’s when they’re successful. If that means one appointment for half an hour and they’re done – great. If that means an hour-long phone conversation, that’s fine too. It’s really what they need to make sure that when they leave they’re comfortable and can do it on their own.”

For Jasperson, the most rewarding part of her job at UW-Superior is seeing students be successful.

“I have a lot of students that are really thankful when you’ve taken the time to sit down and work with them,” she said. “That’s really the most rewarding – knowing that you’ve helped them to help themselves. We’re not here to do it for them, we really help to empower them to do it themselves.”