Wisconsin's Public Liberal Arts College

Chemistry (CHEM)


2010-2012 Catalog

Chemistry (CHEM)

100 Our Chemical Environment (2) Introduces the concepts of chemistry into the interpretation of chemical effects on the environment. Prerequisite: None. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science (environmental component). Credits cannot be counted toward a Chemistry major or minor. F10, S11, F11, S12

101 Elements and the Environment (3) Introduction to basic concepts of chemistry and their importance in gaining a better understanding and appreciation of our environment.  Many topics of current environmental concern will be discussed. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science (environmental component). Credits cannot be counted toward a chemistry major or minor. Students cannot earn credit for both CHEM 100 and 101.

102 Chemistry of Everyday Phenomena (4) Explores the chemistry of foods, drugs, household chemicals, personal hygiene products, agricultural chemicals, materials and other types of chemistry relevant to the student. Current chemistry topics in the popular press will be critically examined. Topics not usually addressed in other science general education courses will be presented. A small part of the course will be devoted to elementary statistics (evaluation, not calculation) to enable students to understand science and medicine as it is commonly reported. An important but minor part of the course involves discussion of the role of research in technology development and standard of living, and the impact of the chemical industry on the national and world economies. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science (laboratory component). Credits cannot be counted toward a Chemistry major or minor. Prerequisite: None. (Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory.) F11, F12, in the online format

105 General Chemistry I (5) Introduction to physical and chemical properties of the elements, chemical reactions, gas laws, chemical nomenclature, structure of atoms, chemical bonding, and solutions. (Four lectures and one three-hour laboratory.) F10, F11, also offered S11, S12 in the online format

106 General Chemistry II (4) Continuation of CHEM 105 studying chemical equilibria, kinetics, electrochemistry, chemical compounds and reactions, qualitative analysis of ions, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry. Prerequisite CHEM 105. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. S11, S12, also offered SS11 and 12 in the online format 

181 Introductory Topics (1-2) Introductory studies of special interest selected by a student and/or faculty member. The course may be independent-study, and it may be either lecture, laboratory, or both. The study most commonly will be introductory laboratory research work by a student considering a chemistry major, but also may be used for other special studies by a highly prepared student in chemistry. Pre- or corequisite: varies with topic and permission of instructor. Individual sections of the course may be offered for a grade or may be offered pass-fail only. May be repeated for a maximum of two credits. Offered upon sufficient demand.

205 Quantitative Analysis Lecture (3) Introductory lecture course in quantitative chemical analysis with major emphasis on classical, wet chemical methods and chemical equilibria. Topics include: concentration calculations, chemical reaction stoichiometry, equivalent weights and normality, titrimetric and gravimetric determinations, acid-base theory, solubilities and precipitation separations, basic electrochemistry, potentiometry, introduction to uv-visible absorbance spectrophotometry. Prerequisite: CHEM 106. Co-requisite: CHEM 206. (Three lectures.) F10, F11

206 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (2) Introductory laboratory course emphasizing wet chemical methods of quantitative analysis. Representative experiments include titrimetry and basic instrumental determinations. Applications of statistics to data analysis are discussed and applied. Co-requisite: CHEM 205. (One four-hour lecture/laboratory.) F10, F11

281 Selected Topics (1) Individual studies of a special interest selected by a student and/or faculty member. The study may involve seminars, special laboratory study. Prerequisites: varies with topic and consent of instructor. (May be repeated for up to two credits.) Offered on sufficient demand.

300 Chemistry of Natural Waters (3) Emphasizes experimental methods used in investigations of the chemistry of natural water systems and the interpretation of chemical parameters indicative of water quality. Prerequisite: CHEM 106. Does not count toward chemistry major. (Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory.) S12

312 Organic Chemistry -- A Short Course (3) One-semester survey in organic chemistry covering material which describes the structure, properties, preparation and reactions of the major classes of organic compounds. Additional topics will be selected from chemical bonding, kinetics, mechanisms and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 106. Corequisite: CHEM 313. Does not count toward a chemistry liberal education major. Counts toward a chemistry secondary education major. (Three lectures.) S11

313 Introduction to Organic Chemistry Lab (2) One-semester laboratory designed to accompany CHEM 312. Work consists of laboratory preparation and study of the chemical and physical properties of compounds of the types covered in CHEM 312. Co-requisite: CHEM 312. Does not count toward chemistry liberal arts major. Counts toward a chemistry secondary education major. (One-hour lecture-demonstration and one three-hour laboratory.) S11

320 Organic Chemistry Lecture I (3) First of a two-semester sequence of courses which make up a standard one-year course in beginning organic chemistry. Study of the structures, properties, preparation and reactions of the major classes of organic compounds. Also includes basic principles of chemical bonding, kinetics, mechanisms and molecular spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 106. Corequisites: CHEM 322 and 327. (Three lectures.) F10, F11

321 Organic Chemistry Lecture II (3) Second of a two-semester sequence of courses which make up a standard one-year course in beginning organic chemistry. Work is made up of the study of the structures, properties, preparation and reactions of the major classes of organic compounds. Also includes basic principles of chemical bonding, kinetics, mechanisms and molecular spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 320; Corequisite: CHEM 323. (Three lectures.) S11, S12

322 Organic Chemistry Lab I (2) First of a two-semester sequence of laboratory courses which accompany CHEM 320 and 321. Consists of laboratory preparation and study of the chemical and physical properties of compounds of the types covered in CHEM 320-321. Some applications of molecular spectroscopy. Corequisite: CHEM 320. (One-hour lecture-demonstration and one three-hour laboratory.) F11, F12

323 Organic Chemistry Lab II (2) Second of a two-semester sequence of laboratory courses which accompany CHEM 320 and 321. Consists of laboratory preparation and study of the chemical and physical properties of compounds of the types covered in CHEM 320-321. Some applications of molecular spectroscopy. Corequisite: CHEM 321. (One-hour lecture-demonstration and one three-hour laboratory.) S11, S12

327 Molecular Spectroscopy I (1) Elementary introduction to the spectroscopic techniques most frequently used by chemists. Brief summaries of the mechanics of the techniques will be given, but major focus is interpretation of spectra generated by the following techniques: mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Students will be expected to identify and sketch structures of simple organic compounds based on spectral interpretation. Corequisite: CHEM 320. (One lecture.) F11, F12

345 Physical Chemistry Lecture I (4) Exposes students to the main principles of modern thermodynamics and chemical kinetics and their applications. Key points of both areas will be illustrated with the examples of thermodynamics of polymer blends and the effect of formation of meta-stable states in polymer thin films. Prerequisite: CHEM 106, MATH 241, PHYS 202 or PHYS 206. Corequisite: CHEM 347. (Four lectures.) F10

346 Physical Chemistry Lecture II (3) Continuation of CHEM 345 emphasizing quantum theory, lasers, spectroscopy, molecular transport, and molecular reaction dynamics. Key points of many of these areas will be illustrated with the phenomenon of surface light-induced drift. Prerequisite: CHEM 345. Corequisite: CHEM 348. (Three lectures.) S11

347 Physical Chemistry Lab I (1) Laboratory work studies laser photochemistry and other applications of lasers in chemistry, as well as thermodynamical properties of gases and liquids, and calorimetry. Corequisite: CHEM 345. (One four-hour laboratory meeting during the last eight weeks of the semester.) F10

348 Physical Chemistry Lab II (2) Continuation of CHEM 347 consisting of laboratory studies of the applications of lasers in chemistry, including kinetic measurements, thermodynamical properties of liquids and macromolecules, electrochemistry, and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 347. Corequisite: CHEM 346. (One four-hour laboratory.) S11

360 Introduction to Biochemistry (3) One-semester survey of principles of biological chemistry. Study of the principal compounds of biochemical importance: proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, their chemistry, metabolic breakdown and biosysthesis, enzymes, co-factors, nucleic acids, regulation of cellular systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 312 or 321. Three lectures. F10, F11

365 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry (3) Survey of the basic chemistry of most elements of the periodic table, including natural abundances, typical compounds in the natural state, purification techniques, and modern uses. Periodic trends will be explored and used as an organizing tool in understanding this chemistry. Includes topics such as crystal packing and ionic structures of solids, acid-base theory, and redox reactions. Prerequisites: CHEM 106 and CHEM 312 or 320. F10

366 Inorganic Chemistry (3) Theoretical approach to the study of inorganic chemistry with emphasis on theories of bonding. Particular attention is given to group theory and molecular orbital theory. Also addresses advanced topics such as organometallic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry and materials science. Prerequisites: CHEM 245, 365. 

367 Inorganic Chemistry Lab (1) A variety of experiments including the study of a number of chemical reactions as well as synthetic methods for the preparation of inorganic compounds and physical measurements of the compounds. Prerequisites:  CHEM 366.

375 Instrumental Analysis Lecture (3) Survey of chemical instrumentation and instrumental methods of analysis. Instrumental methods discussed include: atomic and molecular spectroscopy and spectrometry, chromatography, potentiometry, and voltammetry. Discussion also includes: detection limits and detectability, sensitivity, and methods of data analysis. Prerequisites: CHEM 205 and CHEM 345. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 346. Co-requisite: CHEM 376. (Three lectures.) S11

376 Instrumental Analysis Lab (2) Representative experiments in many of the analytical methods discussed in CHEM 375. Some experiments involve digital data acquisition. Computerized methods of data analysis are employed. Corequisite: CHEM 375. (One four-hour laboratory.) S11

381 Intermediate Topics (1-3) May be offered for individualized or multiple-student instruction on a particular topic. May be independent study, lecture or laboratory. Topic(s) selected based upon student interest with approval of instructor. Prerequisites: varies with topic. Offered on sufficient demand.

420 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3) Study of various advanced topics in organic chemistry, including bonding, stereochemistry, reactive intermediates in organic reactions and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites: CHEM 321 and 346. (Three lectures.) Offered on sufficient demand.

462 Advanced Biochemistry (3) Second semester of a year sequence involving a study of the chemistry of living systems. Takes a more in-depth look at principles covered in the first semester: structure and properties of amino acids and proteins, enzymes, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and nucleic acids, and covers additional topics including enzyme mechanisms, vitamins and co-factors, protein metabolism and bioenergetics. Prerequisites: CHEM 321, CHEM 360, CHEM 345. Corequisite: CHEM 465. S12

465 Laboratory Techniques in Biochemistry and Cell/Molecular Biology (2) Principles and practices of techniques used in biochemistry and in cell and molecular biology. Includes protein isolation and analysis, enzyme kinetics, carbohydrate analysis, immunological techniques for analysis, and techniques of gene cloning and manipulation. Prerequisite: BIOL 330 and CHEM 360 or instructor consent. Recommended: CHEM 462, BIOL 355 AND BIOL 440 or concurrent enrollment. (Lecture one hour, laboratory three hours) Cross-listed as: BIOL 465. S12

481 Special Topics (1-6) In-depth study of specialized current topics in chemistry selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study. May be repeated when topics are different. Prerequisite: varies with topic. Consent of instructor required. Offered on sufficient demand.

491 Senior Research (1-4) Individual laboratory investigation of a selected problem to include a study of the related literature and formal reports. Prerequisites: CHEM 346 and approval of instructor. (May be repeated for up to four credits.) F10, S11, F11, S12

496 Senior Paper (1) Preparation of a formal paper on an advanced chemistry topic. Topic must be approved by instructor. Instructor consent required. Topic chosen for CHEM 496 may not be appropriate for CHEM 497. Consult instructor of CHEM 497. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 345. F10, S11, F11, S12

497 Senior Seminar in Chemistry (1) Each student prepares and gives one or more oral reports on a chemical topic of interest to the student and approved by instructor. Prerequisites: CHEM 345 or senior standing in Chemistry. One lecture-discussion. Does not count toward 400-level credits for ACS certification. F10, S11, F11, S12

 


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