Wisconsin's Public Liberal Arts College

Criminal Justice (CJUS)


2010-2012 Catalog

Criminal Justice (CJUS)

106 Human Behavior and its Control (3) Multidisciplinary analysis of individual, community and government responses to harmful conduct; an examination of criminal, juvenile, military, and civil justice as well as informal and personal control systems; an inquiry into the use of coercion to promote conformity or lessen injurious behavior; special attention given to decisions, processes and institutions which respond to acts of criminality and delinquency. F10, S11, F11, S12

160 Field Experience/Certification Program in Criminal Justice (1-3) An academically grounded, structured professional experience in a justice setting. Students seeking credit should consult with the director of the Criminal Justice program for application guidelines. Written approval of the instructor must be obtained before registering. Since the field experience is an introductory, independent learning experience involving the cooperation and assistance of outside agencies, a student should notify the instructor in writing of an interest in enrolling in the course several months before the semester of the actual field experience. Instructor consent required. Formal arrangements with an agency may be easier to complete with careful, early planning. F10, S11, F11, S12

207 Police in American Communities (3) Broad survey of the role of the police in American society. Special attention given to the origins of policing, the nature of police organizations and police work, and problems and issues in the relationship between police agencies and the total community. F10, F11

212 Managing Criminal Investigations (3) Problems of directing and controlling criminal investigation; survey of the fundamentals of investigation, crime scene search and recording, collection and preservation of evidence, scientific investigation, crime analysis, information sources, interview and interrogation, and case monitoring and preparation. Prerequisite: CJUS 207. S11, S11

301 Study Abroad (0-6) Field trips designed to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation, otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements, consult your advisor. May be repeated only if content is different. As needed F10, S11, F11, S12

312 Gender, Crime, and Justice (3) Exploration of the social construction of gender in crime and delinquency as well as in justice systems; analysis of how assumptions about female and male natures, as well as appropriate roles and positions in society affect the interpretation and application of law; comparison of women/girls and men/boys as offenders, victims and practitioners. S11

315 Criminal Courts and American Justice (3) Examination of the middle stages of justice processing from prosecution to sentencing; analysis of the role of local legal cultures, and nontraditional dispositions in justice processing. S12

316 Crime, Corrections and Punishment (3) Survey of philosophical, historical, sociological, psychological and political aspects of the American prison and related programs in the criminal justice system; problems of inmate culture, control, supervision and treatment are emphasized through analysis of penal institutions and treatment/release programs. Attention is given to examining incarceration through the "eyes" of inmates. The course may be taught from an academic service learning perspective, involving field experiences in custodial settings. Prerequisite POLS 296. S11, S12

318 Community Corrections (3) Analysis of theories and practice of probation and parole, responses of paroling authorities to public pressures and court controls and their implications for rehabilitative efforts; analysis of feasibility and effectiveness of treatment of individuals under sentence in the community. S11, S12

320 Special Topics (3) Selected topics in the administration of justice. May be repeated when the content of the special topic is substantially different from previous course presentations. See course instructor to review content. Previous topics: Military Justice; Terrorism: Meaning and Justice; Masculinities and Crime; Restorative Justice. As needed. F10, S11, F11, S12

448 Criminology (3) Multidisciplinary analysis of criminal behavior. Special attention devoted to the definition, nature and scope of crime in the United States and the explanations which evolved to account for this form of deviant behavior. Includes historical analysis of criminological thought and strategies of social control. F10

463 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice System (3) Examination of the social and psychological dimensions of juvenile delinquency: its nature, extent, distribution and patterns; evaluation of theories and explanations of delinquent causation; consideration of the legal processing of delinquents; programs of prevention and treatment of delinquents. Prerequisite POLS 296. F11

491 Applied Criminal Justice (3) Academic and professional development in justice settings as well as course meetings. A field experience in criminal justice that applies scholarly research to understanding justice agencies and organizations. Students discern policies and practices of justice organizations through systematic observations at agency sites as well as frequent, regularly scheduled course meetings with the course instructor. The workings of agencies and agents will be measured through analytical and reflective writing exercises. Written consent of the instructor must be obtained before registering. Since a significant part of the course is an independent learning experience involving the cooperation and assistance of outside agencies, a student should notify the instructor in writing of an interest in enrolling in the course early in the semester before the semester of the actual field experience. Instructor consent required. Formal arrangements with an agency may be easier to complete with careful, early planning. Course satisfies the requirement of general education as an independent learning and a capstone experience. Students completing CJUS 491 as a senior capstone experience will be required to give a public presentation on their work. See director of the Criminal Justice Program and/or Coordinator in Legal Studies program for more information. Prerequisites: POLS 296 and MATH 130 or PSYC 301. F10, S11, F11, S12

492 Senior Thesis (3) Individually designed research based on approved thesis proposal of a significant and focused justice topic. Generating a coherent researchable idea, reviewing a literature, collecting and analyzing information/date and reporting results. Satisfies the requirement of general education as an independent learning and a capstone experience. Students completing CJUS 491 as a senior capstone experience will be required to give a public presentation on their work. See director of the Criminal Justice Program and/or coordinator in Legal Studies program for more information. Prerequisites: POLS 296 and MATH 130 or PSYC 301. F10, F11

497 Student Initiated Seminar (1-3) The program offers a specially designed seminar or student-initiated seminar when there is sufficient interest. For further information, see the Criminal Justice Program director. Instructor consent required. As needed. F10, S11, F11, S12

499 Individualized Research (1-3) Either supervised research in selected subfields of the discipline resulting in the submission of a formal research paper, or development and execution of a project designed to apply criminal justice or social science concepts and skills to a particular situation, drawing upon the relevant scholarly literature and resulting in submission of a formal research and experience-evaluation paper. Projects devoted to the demonstration of skills may include, but need not be limited to: direct participation in a criminal justice agency; other activity on behalf of a criminal justice interest group; involvement in a University justice agency; service as an intern with a government agency or a private organization with a justice interest; or an active leadership role in a private or community organization. May be repeated once for a total of six credits. Instructor consent required. Consultation with the instructor must take place within the first two weeks of the semester. As needed. F10, S11, F11, S12

 

 


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