Wisconsin's Public Liberal Arts College

WST - Women's Studies


2012-2014 Catalog

WST - Women's Studies

WST - Women's StudiesTop of Page
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
WST 150Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies3.00
Focuses on how we experience gender, particularly women's experiences, and how we can work toward gender equity. Students encounter diverse voices and perspectives, including those of gay, lesbian, bisexual, heterosexual, transgender, and intersex people. Discussion, small-group work, readings, films, and a hands-on project
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
WST 189Women's Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
Typically Offered:
WST 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/WST 210.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
SS Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
WST 255Gender and Sexuality in Writing3.00
Explores writing on gender and sexuality with a focus on texts by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex (LGBTQI) and allied writers from diverse cultures, classes, races, and ethnicities. Students discover and deepen their own perspectives through writing and reading. Students of all genders and gender identities are welcome. Cross listed as WRIT/WST 255.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
WST 258Psychology Of Women3.00
Discussion and study of development of women's roles and personality across the lifespan. Topics include the social construction of sex and gender differences, images of women, status and power, childhood and adolescence, womanhood, love and romance, commitments and relationships, mothering, work and achievement, midlife and beyond, and violence against women. Meets a requirement for the Women's Studies minor and General Education diversity credit. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). Cross-listed as PSYC/WST 258.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
WST 289Women's Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
Typically Offered:
WST 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements,consult your advisor. The course can be repeated only if the content is different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
WST 310Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective3.00
Examines the cultural construction of gender from an anthropological, cross-cultural perspective. Attention is paid to sociocultural factors such as kinship, colonialism, industrialism, and economic development which influence gender definitions, roles, and the structure of gender relations. Cross-listed as ANTH/WST 310.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
WST 312Gender,Crime,and Justice3.00
Exploration of the social construction of gender in crime and delinquency as well as in justice systems; analysis of how assumptions about female and male natures, as well as appropriate roles and positions in society affect the interpretation and application of law; comparison of women/girls and men/boys as offenders, victims and practitioners. Cross-listed as CJUS/WST 312.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
WST 317Men and Women in Nazi Germany3.00
Engages one of the central debates about Nazism and Fascism: How "Modern" was Fascism? Was it a reactionary repudiation of all that modern society stood for - liberalism, democracy, equality, progress? Or was it instead another version of the revolutionary vision of the Modern? In examining this debate, the course takes as its central focus the issue of gender. Changes in the role afforded to men and women, and in beliefs about what it means to be male and female, were at the very center of the revolutionary changes that constituted the shift to the "Modern Era." Investigating how those kinds of gendered roles and beliefs played out in Germany during the crisis of the early 20th Century - from the excitement of High Modernity after the First World War to the attempt to realize a German version of fascism in the Third Reich - should tell us a great deal not only about the essence of fascism and Nazism, but also of Modernity itself. Through extensive reading, discussion, and writing, students will gain a much broader, more complex understanding of the idea of "modern society," of the nature of fascism as both ideology and state form, and of social ideas about masculinity and femininity, and how all of these interact with each other. Code 2. G. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 317.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
WST 322Women and Men in American Society3.00
Evolution of gender roles in the United States from colonial times to present. Explores the changing roles of men and women in American society and investigates social, economic, and political factors that produce these changes. Code 1. G. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 322.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
WST 325Writing Women, Women Writing3.00
Women's non-fiction writing from a variety of time periods and cultures as models for the students' own writing projects. Cross-listed as ENGL/WST 325.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
WST 329Women In Art3.00
Women's expression in painting and sculpture, primarily of the 19th and 20th Centuries. Cross listed as ART/WST 329.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
WST 365Philosophy of Love and Sex3.00
In this course we will begin with the assumption that love and sex cannot be reduced to "a commotion of one's anatomy." Instead we will consider them as two of the most meaningful aspects of human existence, as our most intimate and profound ways of relating to others and to ourselves. Cross-listed as PHIL/WST 365.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
WST 374Women and Politics3.00
In the United States, women hold 18% of the seats in the 112th Congress, marking the nation 85th in its level of representation for women. Globally, women constitute 15% of all members of parliament, although significant regional variation persists. How do gendered hierarchies continue to shape and structure political systems? Why have women not yet reached parity in elected office? Should women be represented as women? What difference do women bring to elective office? These and other questions are explored throughout the course, with particular attention to the historical exclusion of women from the public arena, the methods used by women to enter electoral and activist politics, and the current political status of women in the United States and globally. Cross-listed as POLS/WST 374.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
WST 389Women's Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
Typically Offered:
WST 403African Voices on Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, history, anthropology and fiction about gender issues in Africa. Topics vary from year to year and may include the legacy of slavery and race prejudice, health and gender, the impact of colonialism, environmental causes, African gender identities, the impact of war, and women as peacemakers. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 403. Code 3, G.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
WST 404Arab Voices on Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, fiction, history and ethnography about gender issues in the Arab World. Topics vary from year to year and may include topics like women and nationalism, progress through education and ideology, the Arab feminist movement, gender identities in Arab societies, gender in Islam. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 404. Code 6, G.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
NW Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
WST 406Construction of Gender in East Asia3.00
Advanced seminar course examining the construction of gender in East/Southeast Asia. The construction of gender is placed into a historical context of East Asia, with emphasis on how the nation-state, the family, and war/imperialism affected gender roles and norms. Although primarily focused on the modern period, the course examines the pre-modern context as means to assess the continuities and ruptures in gender roles. In addition, the course devotes more time to women's perspectives because women's voices historically have been marginalized; however, the course examines the construction of masculinity. Strong theoretical focus: construction of gender, the ideology of Orientalism, and the relationship of nationalism and gender. Extensive use of feature films and documentaries, primarily from East Asia, that complement the readings, and how to analyze film as a means to understand the construction of gender. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 406.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
WST 407History of Women and Work in the Pacific Rim3.00
Images of factory girls in sweat shops, under-aged prostitutes, and foreign nannies are prominent in portrayals of East Asia. This course investigates the history behind the how Asian women are racialized through a labor-class nexus, starting in the 19th century and continuing to the present. Some crucial questions will be: How did the state and media transform Asian concepts of gendered ethics to establish a cheap labor pool for emerging industries? How did mechanized wage labor change the status of women as workers? How did laborers mobilize and negotiate for better working and living conditions without unions? What types of subcultures emerged around “factory girl” communities? How did the trafficking of women’s bodies change over time? This course is designed to read East Asian films, history texts and fiction as a means to understand and analyze the past through aesthetic mediums. This course centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essays. Code 5, RE, G. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 407.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
WST 456Feminist Theory and Action3.00
Seminar course providing a deeper look at feminist thought, building on the introduction provided in WST 150. Through readings and films, examines conversations, controversies, and connections among a range of feminist thinkers. Students explore the intersections of feminist thought and action, reading a variety of calls to action and articulating their own. Cross-listed as PHIL/WST 456.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of WST 150 or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
WST 459Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering3.00
This course will explore pregnancy, childbirth, and mothering from two perspectives-the embodied experience of women and its political-social context. We will consider how women's firsthand experiences of motherhood are responses to a broader social milieu. This approach will enable us to think about a variety of philosophical themes and questions with regard to our topic including: philosophical method, embodiment, sex and gender, the origins of ethics, moral obligation, virtue, moral luck, intersubjectivity, and oppression. Cross-listed as PHIL/WST 459.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term every other Year
WST 460The Study of First Nations Women3.00
Exploration of the First Nations woman's social roles and lifestyles from a variety of tribal cultures in North America. Focuses on traditional and contemporary values and roles of First Nations women. Cross-listed as FNS/WST 460.
General Education Attributes:
DIV Diversity
Typically Offered:
WST 475Gender and Globalization in Transnational Asia3.00
Investigates the impact of global capitalism on gender constructions in selected communities in/of Asia. Employing transnational feminist perspectives, course examines local and global social processes and consequences of shifting practices and ideology of gender. Cross-listed as SOCI/WST 475.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101 and a 3 additional credits in Sociology.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
WST 489Women's Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
Typically Offered:
WST 490Special Topics in Women's Studies1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in Women's Studies selected by the instructor. Course may be repeated for credit when instructor and/or topics are different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
WST 499Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Supervised independent study and/or research in Women's Studies. May be supervised by any current member of the Women's Studies faculty.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Women's Study minor, and completion of at least 3 credits in WST and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand

Back to Top