Dept of Human Behv & Diversity Course Descriptions

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FNS - First Nation Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FNS 310Historical Foundations of First Nations Education3.00
Study of major issues in First Nations education, including tribal trends of community control, federal legislation, innovative methods, technique and curriculum, and projections for the future.
 
PSYC - Psychology
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
PSYC 100Self & Social Environment3.00
A humanistic introduction to the field of psychology, with emphasis on adjustment and growth in personal and sociocultural contexts.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Soc Sci - Human Behavior
PSYC 202Experimental Method I:Lab1.00
PSYC 210Development Through Life3.00
A study of development at each of the major periods of the life span; prenatal, infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, later adulthood, and aging. Emphasis on the interplay of physical, cognitive, emotional and social development at each period.
PSYC 251Psychology of Ethnic Minority3.00
PSYC 252Aviation Psychology2.00
PSYC 365Psyc of Human Relations3.00
PSYC 383Psyc of Chemical Dependency3.00
PSYC 401Learning3.00
Examination of theory and experimental and applied research on the principles of Pavlovian and operant conditioning. Learning is the foundation for the study of psychology and provides the basis to understand such diverse phenomena as a punishment, choice behavior, food aversions, drug abuse, depression, phobias and behavioral treatment programs. Two hours of lecture and one 2-hour Learniing Lab (required). Prerequisite: PSYC 101, PSYC 303, and PSYC 304. Meets the Learning, Cognition and Language requirement for the Psychology major.
PSYC 405Senior Seminar3.00
Seminar for senior Psychology majors, providing the capstone experience for the Psychology major. Prerequisite: At least 21 credits in Psychology.
PSYC 456Psychology of the Exceptional Child3.00
Introduction to characteristics of exceptional learners and their education. ("Exceptional" refers to persons with disabilities as well as those who are gifted.) Emphasizes classroom practices as well as the psychological, sociological and medical aspects of disabilities and giftedness. Cross-listed as PSYC/TED 456/656.
PSYC 458Advanced Psychology of Women3.00
Advanced topics in the psychology of women including the role of status and power in the women's llives, feminism, diversity of women's experiences, autonomy and connection in relationships, achievement in context, and physical and mental health. Preprequisite: Psychology 101 or 258, concurrently, or permission of instructor.
PSYC 463Cognitive and Behavior Therapies3.00
Examination of the therapeutic techniques employing principles of behavior theory. Includes approaches to treatment of fears and phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorders; emotional and behavioral disorders; the mentally ill and developmentally disabled; mood disorders; problems with self-control; and behavioral medicine. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or 101. Recommended: PSYC 461 and 462. Meets Adjustment and Clinical requirement for the Psychology major.
PSYC 471Senior Seminar3.00
Reading and discussion of selected contemporary issues in psychology. The course is team-taught by all the Psychology faculty. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a Psychology major or consent of instructor.
PSYC 477Language Development2.00
An examination of the processes and stages of first language acquistion in childhood. Consideration of the interplay of biological and environmental forces. Relationships between the development of spoken language and of reading. Emphases include children with exceptional language. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or consent of instructor.
PSYC 480Psy Disable Learn/Achievement3.00
PSYC 495Senior Honors Sequence2.00 - 6.00
Individually designed selection of 700-level courses in Psych for senior Psyc majors, with approval of advisor and the course instructor.
PSYC 496Personality Type: A Psychological Theory0.67
 
SO W - Social Work
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
SO W 120The Human Services2.00
The Human Services
SO W 321Methods for Social Work Practice I3.00
First of a three-course sequence devoted to development of the ethnic-sensitive, ecologically based, generalist practitioner. Focuses on social work theory and methodology and upon development of social work practice skills. Examines the social work helping process: engagement including exploration and data gathering, assessment and planning, intervention, monitoring and evaluation, and termination. Primary emphasis is on social work practice with individuals. Includes further development of interviewing and interpersonal skills. Training certificate candidates wishing to take this couse must complete all prerequisites. Prerequisites: SOW 121, 227; Co-requisite: Enrollment in SOW 344, formal admission into the Social Work Program.
SO W 324Methods of Social Work Practice II3.00
Second course in the methods sequence using the basic framework of social work practice, theory, helping process and skills examined in SOW 227 and 321. Primary emphasis on small-group systems, including use of group work skills with families and community/organizational systems. Intensive preparation for field practicum. Training certificate candidates wishing to take this couse must complete all prerequisites. Prerequisite: SOW 321; Corequisite: Enrollment in SOW 345.
SO W 327Social Welfare Policy and Services3.00
This course provides an overview of the history of social welfare policies and programs. It examines the structure of present social service programs and the roles and responsibilities of citizens and professionals in policy formulation and implementation. It focuses on the development of skills in analysis and development of social welfare policies and programs and teaches the application of social and economic justice principles in addressing policy alternatives. Prerequisite: POLS 230 or POLS 330. (Last time the course will be offered; being replaced by SO W 325 and 326.)
SO W 330Methods of Social Work Practice I6.00
This is the first of a two course practice sequence devoted to development of the entry-level social work practitioner. It focuses on social work theory and methodology using the problem-solving framework of ecologically-based socially and ethnically sensitive generalist social work practice, as well as upon the development of social work practice skills. Primary emphasis is on entry level social work practice with individuals and families. The course includes basic development of interviewing skills and introduces the basic social work helping process:engagement including exploration and data gathering, assessment and planning, intervention, monitoring and evaluation, and termination. Not open to non-majors. Prerequisites: SO W 121; Co-requisite: Enrollment in SO W 344; formal admission into the Social Work Program.
SO W 360Methods of Social Work Practice II6.00
This is the second of a two course practice sequence devoted to the development of the entry-level generalist social work practitioner. It builds upon the basic framework of social work casework practice, theory, helping process and skills examined in SO W 330. Primary emphasis is on group work (mezzo), agency administration/development (macro) and community organizing/development (macro--local, state, national and international). The course focuses on the values and ethics, knowledge and skills need for practice with groups and in agency and communities settings. It includes content on 1)conscious use of self in the mezzo and macro levels of practice, 2) resolution of ethical dilemmas encountered in mezzo and macro practice situations, 3) organizational planning, administration and supervision, and 4) uses of community organizing, advocacy and policy making. Students develop assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation skills at the mezzo-macro levels. The course provides intensive preparation for field practicum. Not open to non-majors. Prerequisite: SO W 330; Co-requisite: Enrollment in SO W 345.
SO W 386Social Work Practice with American Indian Families3.00
Addresses social work practice issues related to contemporary American Indian family life, including recognition of the importance of American Indian tribal contexts; development and implementation of the Indian Child Welfare Act; impact of sovereignty and other social policy issues on American Indian families; and effective approaches to use when helping American Indian families. Offers an opportunity to better understand and work more effectively with American Indian families. Open to non-majors and can be used as a General Education diversity requirement. Cross-listed as FNS 386.
SO W 421Methods of Practice III3.00
Third course in the methods sequence using the framework of generalist social work practice examined in SO W 227, 321, and 324. Primary emphasis is placed on organizational and community practice. Focuses on agency and community development and includes content on administration and policy, supervision, advocacy and community organizing. Students develop assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation skills at the macro level. Prerequisite: SO W 324 or permission of the instructor. (Last time the course will be offered; being replaced by SO W 360.)
SO W 496Research Projects3.00
Implementation of individually designed and/or team research projects related to social work practice. Emphasis placed upon conceptualization, planning, data collection, data analysis, and research writing. Special attention to ethical and diversity issues in social work research. Prerequisites MATH 130 or PSYC 301, SOW 396.