Social Inquiry

Mission Statement Top of Page

The Department of Social Inquiry fosters intellectual growth and career preparation within a liberal arts tradition that emphasizes individual attention and embodies respect for divers cultures and multiple voices.  through its contribution to the University's general education program and its major and minor curricula, the department helps students to become life-long learners who seek understanding as a valuable end in its own right.  In particular, the department encourages students to apply reflective and systematic through to the social world using the methodological tools of the social sciences and humanities.  our goal is to produce graduates who approach their lives, both as professionals and as responsible members of local and global communities, with reason and creativity.  The Department offers majors and minors in Sociology, Political Science, History and Broadfield Social Studies, along with minors in Anthropology, Global Studies, Philosophy and Gender Studies.

Faculty and Staff Top of Page

Adams, Sarah LaChance - Asst. Professor of Philosophy

Augsburger, Deborah - Asst Prof, Anthropology

Bahm, Karl - Professor, History

Christian, Cindy - Sr Lecturer, Political Science

Dalpiaz, Brenda - Academic Dept Associate

Dokhanchi, Khalil (Haji) - Professor, Political Science

Edwards, Eric - Asst Professor, Sociology

Evans, Brianna - Senior Lecturer - SI

Gan, Cheong Soon - Assistant Professor

Gilbert, Greg - Senior Lecturer - SI

Johnson, Marshall - Professor, Sociology

Leopold, Theresa - Senior Lecturer, Sociology

Mansbach, Daniela - Assistant Professor, Poli Sci

Mulholland, Susan - Sr Lecturer, Anthropology

Prescott, Jill - Lecturer, Social Studies

Riker-Coleman, Erik - Senior Lectures

Shonk Jr, Kenneth - Asst Professor, Social Studies

Sipress, Joel - Professor, History

Smith, Robert - Senior Lecturer

Starratt, Priscilla - Professor, History

Trine, Mari - Senior Lecturer

Von Hagel, Alisa - Asst. Professor

Majors Top of Page

Minors Top of Page

Course Descriptions Top of Page

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ANTH - Anthropology
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ANTH 101The Human Experience3.00
Introduction to the principles, concepts and methods of cultural anthropology. Consideration of the ways in which cultural anthropology contributes to the understanding of human diversity.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ANTH 175Superior Historic Archeology1.00
Students will learn about historic archaeological methodology by taking part in an archaeological excavation of the Old "Firehouse and Police Museum in Superior, WI. The goal of the course is to expose students to archaeological excavation methods and theory in conjunction with study of the historic archeology of Superior. Student findings will be kept on file with the Superior Public Museum.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ANTH 189Anthropology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ANTH 205Language, Culture, and Society3.00
The study of language and language use as essential elements of human culture, connected to thought, experience, identity, power, and social relations.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ANTH 289Anthropology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ANTH 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the faculty.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ANTH 306African Archeology3.00
Introduces the main concepts of archaeological study of African excavations, ruins, material objects, and dating methods and examines how historians move from this scientific evidence to historical interpretations. Examples are drawn from many African regions and sites like Kerma, Meroe, Mapungubwe, Great Zimbabwe, Igbo Ukwu, Akan Gold weights or Yoruba carved doors and may change from year to year. Many films. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST 306. Code 3.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ANTH 310Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective3.00
Examines the cultural construction of gender from an anthropological, cross-cultural perspective. Attention is paid to sociocultural factors such as kinship, colonialism, industrialism, and economic development which influence gender definitions, roles, and the structure of gender relations. Cross-listed as ANTH/GST 310.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of ANTH 101 or SOCI 101 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ANTH 315Cultural Anthropology3.00
Detailed study of the human condition by focusing on a selection of specific cultures.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ANTH 320Environmental Anthropology3.00
Exploration of human-environment interactions across time, space, and diverse cultures. Considers environmental relations involving indigenous, non-Western, and Western groups. Readings address traditional environmental knowledge, changing patterns of subsistence, population, sustainability, urbanism, politics, debates over resources, and more.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ANTH 325Food, Culture and Society3.00
An examination of food's role and uses in distinct communities. Topics may include gender, the body, ethnicity, class, belonging, meaning, culture change, ideology, food movements, and food and inequality.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ANTH 335Anthropology in the Community3.00
Students will do collaborative research in the Superior area, with a community partner, on an issue and/or group of significance to local communities. Past projects have included exploring obstacles to low-income residents' access of healthy food, and understanding how area communities organize support for individuals with life crises. Contact instructor about future topics.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ANTH 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica (located in present-day Mexico, Guatemala, and neighboring areas), both past and present, and their transformations and influence across time and borders. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 4.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ANTH 389Anthropology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ANTH 489Anthropology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101.
ANTH 490Selected Topics in Anthropology3.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in Anthropology selected by the instructor. May be repeated once for credit when instructor and/or topics are different.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101, or ANTH 315, or consent of the instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ANTH 499Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Supervised independent study and/or research in Anthropology. Prior contract with instructor is required.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101 and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
GST - Gender Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
GST 150Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies3.00
Introduction to Women and Gender Studies explores various answers to the question: How does gender influence the way in which we interact with and are impacted by society? To that end, this course introduces students to the feminist ideology and challenges students to incorporate self-exploration with academic skill to utilize this ideology as a lens through which one's personal experience, and the experience of others, within social institutions such as family,government, employment, religion, and education can be analyzed. We will examine how issues of gender within our society intersect with race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, differing abilities, and age to perpetuate a system of oppression.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GST 189Gender Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GST 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/GST 210.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GST 255Gender and Sexuality in Writing3.00
Explores writing on gender and sexuality with a focus on texts by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex (LGBTQI) and allied writers from diverse cultures, classes, races, and ethnicities. Students discover and deepen their own perspectives through writing and reading. Students of all genders and gender identities are welcome. Cross listed as WRIT/GST 255.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 258Gender, Psychology and Society3.00
Discussion and study of development of gender roles across the lifespan. Topics include the social construction of sex and gender differences, status and power, feminist psychology, childhood and adolescence, relationships, family, work and achievement, and diversity. Meets a requirement for the Women's Studies minor and General Education diversity credit. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). Cross-listed as PSYC/GST 258.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 270Psychology of Men and Masculinity3.00
This course is devoted to exploring men's experience in society, the cultural messages men receive about masculinity, and the implications of these for behavior and mental health. Topics include: ideology about the transition from boyhood to manhood, the privileges and perils of manhood status, men's friendships, work primacy, health issues, intimacy and power issues with women, negotiating male sexuality, male violence, and assumptions regarding men's role in the family unit. This is a course for both women and men about issues related to the social construction of masculinity in our culture.
GST 289Gender Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GST 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements,consult your advisor. The course can be repeated only if the content is different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GST 302African Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, history, anthropology and fiction about gender issues in Africa. Topics vary from year to year and may include the legacy of slavery and race prejudice, health and gender, the impact of colonialism, environmental causes, African gender identities, the impact of war, and peacemaking. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 302. Code 3, G.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 310Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective3.00
Examines the cultural construction of gender from an anthropological, cross-cultural perspective. Attention is paid to sociocultural factors such as kinship, colonialism, industrialism, and economic development which influence gender definitions, roles, and the structure of gender relations. Cross-listed as ANTH/GST 310.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
GST 312Gender,Crime,and Justice3.00
Exploration of the social construction of gender in crime and delinquency as well as in justice systems; analysis of how assumptions about female and male natures, as well as appropriate roles and positions in society affect the interpretation and application of law; comparison of women/girls and men/boys as offenders, victims and practitioners. Cross-listed as CJUS/GST 312.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GST 317Men and Women in Nazi Germany3.00
In this upper-division examinatin of the nature of Nazi society and Fascism more gnerally, the central focus will be on gender--the images of and attitudes towards masculinity and feminity, and alternative sexualities, in the Third Reich. Changes in the role afforded to men and women, and in beliefs about what it means to be male and female, were at the very center of the revolutionary changes that constituted the shift to the "Modern Era." In seeking to understand Fascist attitudes toward gender, therefore, the course is seeking to understand not some peripheral aspect of Nazi society, but its very core, the very essence of modern democracy and its nemesis, Fascism. Much attention will be focused on developing skill in understanding and interpreting films and other visual artifacts and how they reveal ideals and assumptions about gender. Code 2. G. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 317.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 322The Construction of Gender in the United States3.00
An examination of gender and sexual identities and roles in the United States from colonial times through the present. Explores the evolution of these roles and identities and the social, economic, and political forces that shape them. Code 1. G. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 322.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 325Writing Women, Women Writing3.00
Women's non-fiction writing from a variety of time periods and cultures as models for the students' own writing projects. Cross-listed as ENGL/GST 325.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 329Women In Art3.00
Women's expression in painting and sculpture, primarily of the 19th and 20th Centuries. Cross listed as ART/GST 329.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 365Philosophy of Love and Sex3.00
In this course we will begin with the assumption that love and sex cannot be reduced to "a commotion of one's anatomy." Instead we will consider them as two of the most meaningful aspects of human existence, as our most intimate and profound ways of relating to others and to ourselves. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 365.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GST 372Arab Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, fiction, history and ethnography about gender issues in the Arab World. Topics vary from year to year and may include topics like the intersection of gender and nationalism, progress through education and ideology, gender rights and gender identities in Arab societies, gender in Islam. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 372. Code 6, G.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 374Women and Politics3.00
In the United States, women hold 18% of the seats in the 112th Congress, marking the nation 85th in its level of representation for women. Globally, women constitute 15% of all members of parliament, although significant regional variation persists. How do gendered hierarchies continue to shape and structure political systems? Why have women not yet reached parity in elected office? Should women be represented as women? What difference do women bring to elective office? These and other questions are explored throughout the course, with particular attention to the historical exclusion of women from the public arena, the methods used by women to enter electoral and activist politics, and the current political status of women in the United States and globally. Cross-listed as POLS/GST 374.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 389Gender Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GST 456Feminist Theory and Action3.00
Seminar course providing a deeper look at feminist thought, building on the introduction provided in GST 150. Through readings and films, examines conversations, controversies, and connections among a range of feminist thinkers. Students explore the intersections of feminist thought and action, reading a variety of calls to action and articulating their own. Cross-listed as POLS/GST 456.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GST 150 or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 459Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering3.00
This course will explore pregnancy, childbirth, and mothering from two perspectives-the embodied experience of women and its political-social context. We will consider how women's firsthand experiences of motherhood are responses to a broader social milieu. This approach will enable us to think about a variety of philosophical themes and questions with regard to our topic including: philosophical method, embodiment, sex and gender, the origins of ethics, moral obligation, virtue, moral luck, intersubjectivity, and oppression. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 459.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
GST 460The Study of First Nations Women3.00
Exploration of the First Nations woman's social roles and lifestyles from a variety of tribal cultures in North America. Focuses on traditional and contemporary values and roles of First Nations women. Cross-listed as FNS/GST 460.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
GST 489Gender Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GST 490Special Topics in Women's Studies1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in Women's Studies selected by the instructor. Course may be repeated for credit when instructor and/or topics are different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GST 499Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Supervised independent study and/or research in Women's Studies. May be supervised by any current member of the Women's Studies faculty.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Women's Study minor, and completion of at least 3 credits in GST and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
HIST - History
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HIST 111Modern World History3.00
Focuses on themes rather than chronology. Students follow the growing globalization of the world through the study of themes like nationalism, industrialization, imperialism, capitalism, decolonization, technologies, gender, race, everyday lives, world systems, migration and Diaspora. Will employ analysis of primary documents, photographs, maps, music, films or other sources of history and build skills of effective writing, clear presentations, use of convincing evidence, increasing geographic literacy and placing the history of specific regions in a global context. Aims to provide an introduction to the discipline of history and its methods. Emphasis on learning to think globally. Code 7.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 115World Religions3.00
A course on the history or world religions, some great and some small: Abrahamic, Dharmic, Indigenous faiths and religions of the Tao. The course stresses links between faiths and their historic origins. All faiths are equally respected. It is NOT a debate about which faith is true or better than another. Code 7.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Humanities-History
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 151History of the United States Through 18773.00
Examination of a series of questions and controversies in United States history from the European conquest to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Explores issues such as the nature of the U.S. Constitution, immigration and industrialization, slavery and emancipation. Provides general education students and majors with an introduction to historica thinking. Code 1.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 152The United States Since 18773.00
Examination of a series of questions and controversies in United States history from the late 19th Century through the present. Explores such issues as labor and social class, race and civil rights, gender and women's rights, the U.S. as global superpower, the Great Depression and social reform. Provides general education students and majors with an introduction to historical thinking. Code 1.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 160Arab Identities3.00
Explores the construction of Arab identities through language, culture, the spread of Islam and historical events: the birth of Islam, the colonial experience, Arab nationalism, Pan Arabism, the Palestinian conflict. Examines forces that brought Arabs together and those that have been divisive: social class, religions and sects, ethnicities in the Lebanese Civil War and Iraqi conflicts. Films. No prior knowledge needed. Code 6. RE.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 161African Peoples and Issues3.00
Introductory course on modern Africa which covers major historical trends. Particularly useful for future high school teachers. Covers topics like the slave trade, the impact of colonialism, nationalist resistance movements, African aspirations at independence and political unity and disunity. Many films are shown and all texts are written by Africans, including autobiography, drama and novels. Code 3.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 189History Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 212The Ancient Mediterranean World3.00
General-education-level course introducing students to the basic outlines of the history of the Mediterranean region -- including Greece, Rome, Spain, northern Africa, and Palestine -- from the earliest times to the Middle Ages. While investigating some key events and stories from these places and times, students learn to critically evaluate the ways these stories are re-told in our time, using actual texts and documents from the times in comparison to books and movies about those times from our day. Code 2.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 218History of Modern China3.00
Examines how China, as one of the most powerful, wealthy, and technologically advanced premodern civilizations, buckled under Western imperialism and encountered a 20th Century history filled with peasant revolts, western modernization reforms, fractious nationalist movements, and revolution. Themes include: an examination of Europe's rising power in the East, the Opium Wars, Qing Dynasty's isolation policies and eventual collapse, why the Communists, under Mao Zedong, won the civil war, how China's communist and Cold War era affected the Chinese diaspora, how Deng Xiaoping reformed the country's economic systems. Code 5.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 219History of Premodern East Asia3.00
Examination of “premodern” East Asia with emphasis on: East Asian philosophical and spiritual traditions and how these traditions affected the development of East Asian civilizations; the contribution East Asia played in the development of world history; and to challenge perspectives that often view East Asia civilization as monolithic, static, and backward. Some particular themes include how Confucianism created a self-regulated society, how Chinese civilization developed and implemented a democratic ethos in government, Genghis Khan and the making of the modern world, the great treasure fleets of the Ming Dynasty, and Japanese samurai (warrior) culture. Course uses several East Asian films and documentaries as a means to understand and analyze the past through a film medium. Course centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essay. Introduces students to the study and discipline of history. Code 5.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 220History of Modern Asia3.00
Examination of Asia in the modern period (1600 to present). Requires no prior knowledge of the region. Emphasizes how the rise of the West affected the historical development of Asia and how Asia responded to Western dominance. Themes include: how Britain cobbled an empire out of the many states in the Indian subcontinent and Burma; the impact French, Dutch and British rule had on Southeast Asian societies in modern-day Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore; the philosophies of race and the techniques of colonialism; the failure of the hitherto successful Chinese political system to meet the challenge of Western imperialism, and conversely, how Japan succeeded where China failed, and finally the impact of Japanese imperialism on her fellow Asian nations. Uses several Asian films and documentaries as a means to understand and analyze the past through a film medium. Centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essays. Introduces students to the study and discipline of history. Code 5.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223. Code 1.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Humanities-History
HIST 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224. Code 1.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Humanities-History
HIST 225Latin America Since Independence3.00
Introduction to major themes and issues in modern Latin American history. Focus is on issues of development and underdevelopment. Students consider various theories of underdevelopment and weigh their relative merits using Latin America as a case study. Code 4.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 230Early-Modern Europe/From Medieval to Early-Modern Europe3.00
An introductory course on the idea of Europe’s gradual emergence from the “Middle Ages” into the “Modern” era. Through focus on a few selected topics like peasants’ lives, the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, or the emergence of capitalism, students will gain familiarity with some of the key stories of the early-modern European past, while also developing skill in the basic methods and purposes of historical inquiry. Course activities will focus on close reading of historical documents, discussion, essay writing, and formal oral argument. Code 2.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 231Modern Europe 1789 to Present3.00
An introductory course on Europe's tumultuous "modern" era, from the French Revolution to the present. Focus on a few key topics, like the Liberal revolutions, industrialization, the World Wars, Nazism and totalitarianism, or the efforts to create a European Union, will allow students both to delve deeply into particular episodes of European history and at the same time to develop skill in the basic methods and purposes of historical inquiry. Course activities will focus on close readings of historical documents, discussion, essay writing, and formal oral argument. Code 2.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 240Early Africa3.00
How do we know early African history? Looks at archaeology in South Africa, oral traditions in Mali, written documents in West and East Africa, ethnography of the East African coast and a fictional treatment of the slave trade. Explores the nature of history and its reconstruction. Many films. Code 3.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 241Africa In Modern Times3.00
A topics course that looks at modern trends in African history, including the slave trade, colonialism, independence movements, challenges of national unity and economic and social progress. Explores the nature of history and its analysis. Several films. Code 3.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 254African-American Voices3.00
Explores the African-American experience over the past two centuries with an emphasis on social and political discourse. The ideas of major political, literary, cultural and intellectual figures, as well as the content of black folk and popular culture, will be examined in a social and historical context. Authors include Douglass, DuBois, Hurston, Garvey, King, Malcolm X, and bell hooks. Code 1.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 256Introduction to Historical Research and Writing-History of Wisconsin3.00
Introduction to basic methods of research and writing in the discipline of history using the History of Wisconsin as a subject matter. Either HIST 256 or HIST 257 is required of all history majors and minors. HIST 256 is required of all students seeking secondary certification in history. Should ordinarily be taken in the sophomore year. Enrollment limited to students majoring or minoring in History or Social Studies, or by permission of instructor. Code 1.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 257The Longest War: Introduction to Historical Research and Writing3.00
Uses the Israeli/Palestinian conflict to investigate basic methods of research and writing the discipline of history. Students produce a short research paper on topic of their choosing. Either HIST 256 or HIST 257 is required of all history majors and minors. Should ordinarily be taken in the sophomore year. Enrollment limited to students majoring or minoring in History and Social Studies, and by permission of instructor. Code 6.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 264War and Peace in Bosnia3.00
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of various theories of the causes of conflict and conflict resolution within the specific historical context of the disintegration of Yugoslavia during the 1990s, and particularly the Bosnian was of 1992-95. Using those historical events and the questions they raise as a test-case, the course will try to come to some general conclusions about the nature and causes of ethnic conflict and how it differs from interstate conflict; the reasons for and methods of international intervention, including negotiation, arbitration, adjudication, and mediation; the factors that contribute to the success or failure of various methods of intervention and conflict resolution; the challenges involved in re-building societies after war; and the long-term prospects for fostering peace, security, justice, and human rights through such efforts. Code 2. RE.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
HIST 266War and Peace in Northern Ireland3.00
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of various theories of the causes of conflict and conflict resolution within the general historical context of the rise and demise of the British Empire, and particularly the Northern Ireland question. Using those historical events and the questions they raise as a test-case, the course will try to come to some general conclusions about the nature and causes of ethnic conflict and how it differs from interstate conflict; the reasons for and methods of international intervention, including negotiation, arbitration, adjudication, and mediation; the factors that contribute to the success or failure of various methods of intervention and conflict resolution; the challenges involved in re-building societies after prolonged civil war; and the long-term prospects for fostering peace, security, justice, and human rights through such efforts. Code 2. RE.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
HIST 281The Muslim World3.00
Survey-level course introduces students to a variety of topics about the Muslim world from multidisciplinary perspectives. The time and life of the prophet Muhammad, the rise of great Islamic empires, Islam and women, the spread of Islam in America and the explosion of Islamic resurgence and extremism are all topics for consideration. Code 6.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 289History Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the Social Inquiry faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different. (Regular ongoing topics: War and Peace in Bosnia.) Code will depend on the specific program.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 302African Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, history, anthropology and fiction about gender issues in Africa. Topics vary from year to year and may include the legacy of slavery and race prejudice, health and gender, the impact of colonialism, environmental causes, African gender identities, the impact of war, and peacemaking. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 302. Code 3, G.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 306African Archeology3.00
Introduces the main concepts of archaeological study of African excavations, ruins, material objects, and dating methods and examines how historians move from this scientific evidence to historical interpretations. Examples are drawn from many African regions and sites like Kerma, Meroe, Mapungubwe, Great Zimbabwe, Igbo Ukwu, Akan Gold weights or Yoruba carved doors and may change from year to year. Many films. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST 306. Code 3.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 311The Working Class and the Dream of Equality in Europe3.00
Upper-division seminar in the history of radical egalitarian movements in the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing on Europe. Tracing the evolution of the idea of Equality from the French Revolution, Marxist socialism, Soviet communism, to the minority and student revolts of the 1960s, the course will seek to understand this history both as a radical intellectual critique of ordinary working people seeking immediate political and economic benefits. Emphasis will be communication their opinions in formal essays and debates. Code 2.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 314Nationalism and Nationalist Movements3.00
Upper-division seminar on the phenomenon of natinalism and its roles in the history of modern Europe and the modern world. One of the two main foci is on in-depth examinationa of key nationalist movments in European history like the Irish, German, and Servian. These case studies are paired with an eamination of the evolution of Western social scientists; attempts to understand the nature of the phenomenon, from political-intellectual to sociological and anthropological perspectives. Primary emphasis will be placed on students' developing the ability to understand and use academic theories in explaining actual historical events. Code 2. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 315War and Peace in the Former Yugoslavia3.00
An attempt to understand in historical perspective the recent conflicts in Yugoslavia. With those events and the questions they raise in the forefront, and attempting to get beyond the simplistic stereotypes which too often fill the media, the course aims to examine the historical antecedents for the warfare, the ways in which history (both real and mythical) is used to explain and justify it, and also the ways in which the conflicts are fueled not by "ancient hatreds" but rather by purely contemporary political and economic competition. A main goal is to understand the conflicts among the peoples of Yugoslavia within the context of their centuries of fruitful coexistence. Required for all participants in the War and Peace in Bosnia Study Abroad course. Code 2. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 317Men and Women in Nazi Germany3.00
In this upper-division examinatin of the nature of Nazi society and Fascism more gnerally, the central focus will be on gender--the images of and attitudes towards masculinity and feminity, and alternative sexualities, in the Third Reich. Changes in the role afforded to men and women, and in beliefs about what it means to be male and female, were at the very center of the revolutionary changes that constituted the shift to the "Modern Era." In seeking to understand Fascist attitudes toward gender, therefore, the course is seeking to understand not some peripheral aspect of Nazi society, but its very core, the very essence of modern democracy and its nemesis, Fascism. Much attention will be focused on developing skill in understanding and interpreting films and other visual artifacts and how they reveal ideals and assumptions about gender. Code 2. G. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 317.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 318The Holocaust in Modern Memory3.00
The Holocaust, which ended more than 70 years ago, has never been more present than it is today, exercising a hold on the imagination, especially in the United States and Western Europe, more powerful even than in the immediate aftermath of the war. But why should that be true? Why is it that the social memory of this particular event should have such power over generations so far removed in both time and space--particularly when other episodes of genocidal violence, similar in scale and historical importance--play almost no role in our collective memories and consciousness? This upper-division seminar focuses attention ion those questions by examining the history of the memory of the Holocaust: how it is remembered; what is remembered and what is forgotten; how the memories are shaped; and to what uses they are put. Close readings of survivor memoirs and historical interpretations, and visual analyses of films and monuments will help students learn to critique the ways in which all "history" is socially constructed. Code 2. RE.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 320Workers in Industrial America3.00
An examination of workers and work in the modern United States. Topics range from the nature of the modern workplace to the impact of the labor movement. Examines the impact of industrialization on workers and work, and the efforts of working men and women to shape their working lives. Issues of Political Economy, including but not limited to collective bargaining, are emphasized. Code 1. DIV.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 321The Sixties3.00
Examines the interlocking series of social and political crises that erupted in the United States in the 1960s. Topics include: civil rights and black power, urban unrest, the Vietnam War and the anti-war movement, the youth rebellion, the rebirth of feminism, and the conservative backlash. Studies the underlying causes of upheaval as well as the decade's legacy. The course emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of primary historical sources. Code 1.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 322The Construction of Gender in the United States3.00
An examination of gender and sexual identities and roles in the United States from colonial times through the present. Explores the evolution of these roles and identities and the social, economic, and political forces that shape them. Code 1. G. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 322.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 323The Asian-American Experience3.00
Examines the historical experience of Asian immigrants and how they developed into "Asian-Americans." Addresses the problem of the essentialization of Asian-Americans and instead seeks to show the complexities and conflict involved in the image or construction of Asian-Americans. Deconstructs notions of race, ethnicity and discrimination and uses other categories of analysis, such as gender and class, to understand the historical experience of Asian-Americans. Code 1. RE.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 324First Nations Wisconsin History3.00
History of the native peoples of Wisconsin from prehistoric times to the present. Major emphasis on the six federally recognized tribes in Wisconsin. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 324. Code 1.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
HIST 330Topics in World History3.00
Required for History and Broad Field Social Studies education majors. Looks at several topics, controversies and strategies to help prepare for teaching world history. Topics range from human evolution, city states, world religions, trade systems, and great empires and includes new perspectives on what world history ought to involve. Normally taken junior year. Especially for EAA prospective teachers. Code 7.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 335Slavery and Prejudice3.00
Reading seminar explores the relationship between the institution of slavery and race prejudice in different time periods and regions of the world. May include the United States; the Caribbean, especially Cuba, Brazil, Africa, the Middle East, and contemporary slavery. No prerequisites but students need to be strong readers. Global perspectives on one of humanities worst institutions. Code 7. RE.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 340History of Modern Ireland,1600-Present3.00
This course will cover Irish history from the early modern period through the present. The course will focus on themes including gender and sexuality, society and popular culture, nationalism, identity, and memory. Particular emphasis will be placed on historiographical debates unique to Ireland's history. Code 2. RE
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior or Senior class standing.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 363Civil War and Reconstruction3.00
Examination of the American Civil War and its aftermath emphasizing social and political history. Organized around three main questions: Why did civil war erupt in the United States in 1861? What effect did the wartime experience have on American society? What was at stake in the struggles of the Reconstruction period? Code 1.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica (located in present-day Mexico, Guatemala, and neighboring areas), both past and present, and their transformations and influence across time and borders. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 4.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 369The Shadow Of Mexican Revolution3.00
Examines the revolution of 1910-1920 and its legacy with particular emphasis upon the ways in which the culture, politics, and society of contemporary Mexico have evolved in the revolution's shadow. Particular attention is paid to the interrelated development of the state and the nation in modern Mexico. Code 4.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 371The Modern Middle East3.00
Topics in Middle East history such as the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the Arab Spring or the conflict in Darfur when exploring themes of colonization and independence, Islamization, treatment of minorities, and democratization. Several films. Code 6.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 372Arab Gender3.00
Seminar-style reading class with autobiography, fiction, history and ethnography about gender issues in the Arab World. Topics vary from year to year and may include topics like the intersection of gender and nationalism, progress through education and ideology, gender rights and gender identities in Arab societies, gender in Islam. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 372. Code 6, G.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 382East Asia and U.S. Interactions in Historical Context3.00
Examines East Asian (including Southeast Asia) and U.S. interactions at multiple levels (state-to-state, social, cultural and economic). Begins with the rise of Western imperialism in Asia in the mid-19th Century, to examining the major East Asia-U.S. wars in East Asia in the 20th Century (Philippines, Japan, China, Korea, and Vietnam), the decision to use atomic bombs against Japan, and concluding with East Asia's development as a major economic power. Uses several East Asian films and documentaries as a means to understand and analyze the past through a film medium. Centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essays. Codes 1 or 5.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 383The History of Modern Korea3.00
This course examines the historical causes for North and South Korea to develop into two extremely different countries on the world stage: South Korea, becoming the most technologically networked country in the world, and North Korea becoming America's "axis of evil." This course will present a general overview of the latter half of the Chosen Dynasty (1700) to the present focusing on topics such as peasant land and labor disputes, neo-Confucian statecraft reform debates, gunboat diplomacy, imperialist and nationalist movements, national division and Cold War ideologies, South Korean democracy movements and the global phenomenon of Hallyu media products. Some prevalent themes in this course will be Orientalism, modernity, postcolonial identities, class, gender, and transregional identity. We will be using Korean literature, (documentary and fictional) film and visual media to understand and analyze the past through a variety of mediums. This course centers on active-dynamic learning such as oral presentation, peer evaluation, student facilitated discussion, critical reading reflection, and analytical essays. Code 5, RE, G.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 385Samurai: A History Of Modern Japan3.00
This course traces the history of modern Japan through the development of the samurai as a distinct social group over the last millennium. We will explore the myths and reality of samurais as warriors and bureaucrats, their professional and family lives, and their symbolic meaning within Japanese and popular culture. This seminar-style course examines the rise and fall of the samurai caste through first person accounts, scholarly articles and films, not just the great Kurosawa epics, but also lesser known accounts by Hirayama, Oshima, Yamada and others. Code 5.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 389History Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 393Topics in Modern Southeast Asia3.00
This course focuses on one or two major themes in Southeast Asian history through both a regional lens as well as through national histories of Burma/Myanmar, the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Cambodia and Vietnam. Some of the theses include European colonization and the indigenous response; the shaping of a modern colonial plural society; the effects of economic transformation; anti-colonialism and nationalism, decolonization, the Cold War and nation-building; race and racism; the history of marginalized and everyday groups; women and gender in the construction of social and political identities; and so on. Code 5; Asian History.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 394Interrogating the Vietnam War: A History of Modern Vietnam (1885-1975)3.00
When we think of the Vietnam War, we think of a critical period in 20th century American history: the winging 60s, napalm bombs, mysterious Viet Cong fighters, campus protests, the peace movement, and America's defeat. But there is another side to the war: The "Vietnam" side. This course explores the conflict from that other side. To understand why the Vietnamese took up arms, we examine roughly a century of history beginning with the complete loss of independence to the French in the 1880s and ending with the reunification of the country in 1975. We explore why the Vietnamese resented the French, how young Vietnamese broke with their Centuries-long traditions and radicalized, how women found opportunities in a new modernity, how Ho Chi Minh made several efforts to ally with America (and why the US said "No"), and how, ultimately, the US got drawn into a war it had little understanding of. Code 5.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 395Modern India: From Gandhi to Slumdog Millionaire3.00
This course examines the impact of colonialism on the Indian subcontinent and on the formation of the modern India. We will also explore contemporary post-colonial themes such as the urbanization of India, the question of Indian-ness in the face of a growing and prosperous global Indian diaspora (or, why there is an Indian restaurant in just about any town in the US). Code 5.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 406Construction of Gender in East Asia3.00
Advanced seminar course examining the construction of gender in East/Southeast Asia. The construction of gender is placed into a historical context of East Asia, with emphasis on how the nation-state, the family, and war/imperialism affected gender roles and norms. Although primarily focused on the modern period, the course examines the pre-modern context as means to assess the continuities and ruptures in gender roles. In addition, the course devotes more time to women's perspectives because women's voices historically have been marginalized; however, the course examines the construction of masculinity. Strong theoretical focus: construction of gender, the ideology of Orientalism, and the relationship of nationalism and gender. Extensive use of feature films and documentaries, primarily from East Asia, that complement the readings, and how to analyze film as a means to understand the construction of gender. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 406.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 407History of Women and Work in the Pacific Rim3.00
Images of factory girls in sweat shops, under-aged prostitutes, and foreign nannies are prominent in portrayals of East Asia. This course investigates the history behind the how Asian women are racialized through a labor-class nexus, starting in the 19th century and continuing to the present. Some crucial questions will be: How did the state and media transform Asian concepts of gendered ethics to establish a cheap labor pool for emerging industries? How did mechanized wage labor change the status of women as workers? How did laborers mobilize and negotiate for better working and living conditions without unions? What types of subcultures emerged around “factory girl” communities? How did the trafficking of women’s bodies change over time? This course is designed to read East Asian films, history texts and fiction as a means to understand and analyze the past through aesthetic mediums. This course centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essays. Code 5, RE, G. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 407.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 440Ireland and World History3.00
Though a small nation in western Europe, Ireland has played a significant role in the grand scope of world history. The course will focus on Ireland as a locus of global historical phenomena, including the Irish Diaspora,Ireland's role in the colonization and decolonization of the British Empire, perceptions of Ireland throughout the world, and Ireland's international cultural influence. Code 7, RE.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior or Senior class standing.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 450The Construction of Race and Nationality3.00
In recent years scholarship on race and nationality has been revolutionized by a growing realization that racial and national identities are not fixed, but rather are social constructions that are fluid and changeable. This team-taught seminar examines the social, political and cultural processes through which race and nationality are formed. Cross-listed as HIST/SOCI 450. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 470Watersheds in Global History3.00
This course will examine watershed moments in history, focusing on a particular year or trend. Students will be challenged to draw connections between regions so as to best understand cause and effect of seminal moments in history. Offerings will differ and courses may include studies various event , themes, and/or global phenomena.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior or Senior class standing.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 489History Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 490Public History Internship3.00
A structured field experience. Students provide 150 hours of museum, archival, or other public history work to a local organization. Students receive training and experience under the supervision of a public history professional. Permission of a supervising faculty member required. See the History Program coordinator for information. No Code
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 495Special and Student Initiated Seminar1.00 - 3.00
This department offers a specially designed seminar or student-initiated seminar when interest warrants. In certain circumstances this course can be adapted to serve as the capstone experience. For further information see Special or Student-Initiated Seminar in the index of this catalog. Code will depend on topic selected.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 496Historiographical Research Theories and Methodologies3.00
Advanced seminar in current methodological and historiographical debates and trends in the historical profession. Introduces students both to the ways in which the writing of history has evolved and changed over time, and to the wide variety of theories and methods that dominate approaches to historical research and writing today. Through focused readings and discussions, students learn to recognize and critically evaluate the underlying assumptions, starting questions, methodologies and theoretical models at work in some of the most important historical debates of the past few decades. Individual historiographical research projects serve as the first step toward the students' primary research for their senior theses in HIST 497. Required of all History majors, and ordinarily taken in the fall of a student’s senior year.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 6 credits of History at the 300-level or above, or with instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 497Senior Thesis3.00
Guided research on a selected historical topic resulting in a thesis paper. Working closely with history faculty, students move beyond engagement with the existing secondary literature on their topic to conduct their own primary research and arrive at their own findings and argument. Individual work in cooperation with a faculty thesis advisor will be balanced with collaborative discussions among all students writing theses. The capstone will be a mini-conference in which each student presents her or his research findings to peers and guests.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HIST 496.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 498Study Abroad1.00 - 5.00
Field trips designed to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the instructor. With consent of the department chair and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Code depends on region visited.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 499Independent Study1.00 - 3.00
For advanced students majoring or minoring in History who have shown themselves capable of independent work. Each student is directed by a faculty member chosen by the student. Prerequisite: Approval of the department chair. Code will depend on topic selected.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
PHIL - Philosophy
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
PHIL 151Introduction To Philosophy3.00
Philosophy concerns some of the most fundamental questions: Why do human beings exist? Does everything have a cause? Can you think without language? What does it mean to live a good life? What is the nature of freedom? Are humans truly free? We will consider these questions and more through exploring perspectives from around the globe, from the ancient to the contemporary.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHIL 160Philosophy and Film3.00
In this course we will view films with philosophical themes and pair them with readings that help us to consider those themes more deeply. Readings will be at the introductory level; and films will include everything from the artsy to the absurd.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHIL 175Philosophy Of Religion3.00
Examination of the religious dimension of human experience. Topics include the nature of religion as an aspect of human experience, an introductory study of the major religious traditions (Buddhism, Hinduism, Christianity and others), and traditional philosophical problems, such as the existence of God, the problem of evil, and the possibility of immortality.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHIL 189Philosophy Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHIL 211Contemporary Moral Problems3.00
Are all acts inherently selfish? Should everyone follow the same moral laws? Do we need God to tell us how to behave? Why should we be good and what does that even mean? Should all living creatures be treated equally? In this course we will entertain questions like these as we apply moral theories to a selection of contemporary issues (for example, human rights, environmental ethics, the global sex trade, the death penalty). A key concern will be our ethical responsibilities in the diverse contemporary global theater.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHIL 212Critical Thinking3.00
Basic elements and common patterns of argument. Inductive and deductive modes of thought are explored with emphasis on the concepts and principles of correct reasoning. Designed to assist students to understand and evaluate ordinary arguments and to develop skills in constructing arguments in the spoken and written word. Cross-listed PHIL/PSYC 212.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHIL 250The Philosophy of Children3.00
In this course, we will both cultivate our wonder about children, and their wonder about the world. This will be achieved by first considering children and childhood through a philosophical lens, and second, by exploring the manner in which children themselves philosophize. Our ultimate purpose will be to take this knowledge into local elementary classrooms and to engage children in philosophical thought, encouraging their inherent sense of wonder, and cultivating an appreciation for their unique perspectives on life.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of PHIL 151, or PHIL 211, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
PHIL 262Introduction to Political Theory3.00
This course exposes students to some of the classic pieces in this field of political theory and teaches them how to work with theoretical and philosophical texts that continue to shape, inform, and challenge the analysis of current political phenomena today. Through these texts, the course introduces questions about the nature of human beings, the roots of government authority, the best regime, and the circumstances of legitimate revolution as well as ideals such as liberty, equality, rights, and justice. Cross-listed as PHIL/POLS 262.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 289Philosophy Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHIL 300History and Philosophy of Science3.00
Examines the nature of science, the history of science, and the nature and history of the impact of science on human life and thought. Provides some understanding of the methods of science, the difference between science and pseudo science, the political and ideological uses of science, and the moral responsibilities of scientists and science educators. Cross listed as PHIL/PHYS 300.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHIL 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. Also, for specific degree requirements, please consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHIL 330Teaching for Social Justice3.00
Students will investigate what it means to be a teacher who is concerned with social justice. Central concerns will include: identifying and addressing inequalities of power within the classroom; making the classroom a liberating (rather than oppressive) place; the self-reflective classroom; and how to respond to students' (latent and manifest) sexism, racism, classism and homophobia. This course will be relevant to those with interests in philosophy, women's and gender studies, and for those planning to work in education, social service, non-profits, or community activism.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 340Enlightenment, Freedom and Alienation (19th Century Philosophy)3.00
In this course we will read philosophers who are concerned with our liberation from inherited, imprisoning beliefs systems. As such, special attention will be given to the philosophical question of freedom, its limits, and its use as a basis for rationality, morality, and politics. This course will focus primarily on philosophers from the Enlightenment (Kant) through German Idealism (Hegel) Schelling, Kierkegaard, Nitzsche, Marx and Husserl.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of PHIL 151, or POLS 262, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
PHIL 350The Self-Unconcealed (20th Century Philosophy)3.00
"Know thyself" seems like good advice. But what does it mean to know yourself? Aren't some aspects of ourselves hidden from us? Do others know us in ways that we can never know ourselves? This course is an exploration of (mostly 20th Century Continental) philosophers notions of the self/subjectivity. Interestingly, they consider the self as something fundamentally concealed/hidden/absent from oneself. Our ongoing question will be; how can we have any self-knowledge in light of these ideas? Philosophers we will consider may include: Husserl, Sartre,Levinas, and Derrida.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of PHIL 151, or PHIL 211, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
PHIL 351Selected Topics3.00
In-depth study of a particular problem, philosopher or period of current interest. May be repeated for up to nine credits provided topics are different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHIL 365Philosophy of Love and Sex3.00
In this course we will begin with the assumption that love and sex cannot be reduced to "a commotion of one's anatomy." Instead we will consider them as two of the most meaningful aspects of human existence, as our most intimate and profound ways of relating to others and to ourselves. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 365.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 389Philosophy Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHIL 459Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering3.00
This course will explore pregnancy, childbirth, and mothering from two perspectives-the embodied experience of women and its political-social context. We will consider how women's firsthand experiences of motherhood are responses to a broader social milieu. This approach will enable us to think about a variety of philosophical themes and questions with regard to our topic including: philosophical method, embodiment, sex and gender, the origins of ethics, moral obligation, virtue, moral luck, intersubjectivity, and oppression. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 459.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
PHIL 489Philosophy Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHIL 490Independent Study1.00 - 3.00
Individually supervised reading and study of a topic or problem of student interest. A paper is required.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
POLS - Political Science
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
POLS 100Introduction to Political Science3.00
Politics is often perceived as cynical and subsidiary from the normative interaction of society. But what is politics? What is the role of politics in society? What is the relationship between politics and government? To what extent does politics influence human relations and the ways in which government and its institutions function? The course will examine these questions by focusing on one topic each semester. Each of these topics--such as the concept of borders, citizenship, globalization, immigration, etc.--represents a central debate in politics, and introduces some of the current concerns in our world today.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
POLS 101Introduction to Comparative Politics3.00
The recent history of Afghanistan has highlighted the complexities of national and state building. This course explores these two terms and what they mean. Is there a single universal definition and a singular path to modernity or are there multiple definitions and pathways to modernity? The first part of the course will examine the various theories of development with this question in mind. The second part of the course will focus on one developing country. By concentrating on their development pattern we draw out some lessons about tensions and contradictions that accompany development.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 150Introduction to American Government3.00
Theory and practice of American national government; the Constitution as an instrument of change through interpretation and action by the executive, legislative and judicial branches as well as through the development of informal custom and usage.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 175The Making of the Modern Global System3.00
Is another world possible? Could we have inherited a different global order? We examine the pillars of current global order, such as the rise of capitalism, emergence of state, violence, imperialism, rise and fall of dominant states, and emergence of democratic values and institutions. We particularly examine how we as individuals interact and help maintain the current global order with an understanding that we can change the current order for a better order in the future. The second part of the course examines various theories of how to understand the global order ranging from realism, liberalism, Marxism, to globalization, human security and feminism.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
POLS 189Political Science Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
POLS 230U.S. National,State and Local Government3.00
Structure of American government on the national, state and local levels; federalism; behavior patterns of public officials; modes of citizen participation. Meets DPI requirements. Not open to Political Science majors.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
POLS 260Contemporary Issues in American Politics3.00
Same-sex marriage, welfare reform, stem cell research, urban poverty, the legalization of medical marijuana...these and other contemporary issues incite tremendous passion among the public, leading to policy debates, disputes over the role of government in American society and controversial social policy. This course goes beyond the surface-level debates and explores the political and social context of contemporary political controversies as well as the ramifications of government policies.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
POLS 262Introduction to Political Theory3.00
This course exposes students to some of the classic pieces in this field of political theory and teaches them how to work with theoretical and philosophical texts that continue to shape, inform, and challenge the analysis of current political phenomena today. Through these texts, the course introduces questions about the nature of human beings, the roots of government authority, the best regime, and the circumstances of legitimate revolution as well as ideals such as liberty, equality, rights, and justice. Cross-listed as PHIL/POLS 262.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
POLS 263Contemporary Issues in World Politics3.00
Examines issues such as nationalism, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, war on drugs, land mines, diplomacy, global poverty, globalization, regionalization, regional development, European Union, global market, human rights, women's rights, right of refugees, minority rights, rise of religious fundamentalism, population, consumption, citizenship, global warning, ozone layer, biodiversity, rain forests, and conservation. Deals with basic understanding of the nature and scope of global problems and emphasizes the legal, political, economic, social and moral dimensions of these issues.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
POLS 264War and Peace in Bosnia3.00
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of various theories of the causes of conflict and conflict resolution within the specific historical context of the disintegration of Yugoslavia during the 1990s, and particularly the Bosnian was of 1992-95. Using those historical events and the questions they raise as a test-case, the course will try to come to some general conclusions about the nature and causes of ethnic conflict and how it differs from interstate conflict; the reasons for and methods of international intervention, including negotiation, arbitration, adjudication, and mediation; the factors that contribute to the success or failure of various methods of intervention and conflict resolution; the challenges involved in re-building societies after war; and the long-term prospects for fostering peace, security, justice, and human rights through such efforts. Code 2. RE.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
POLS 265Contemporary Issues in Political Theory3.00
Introduces students to the origin and theoretical background of some of the central debates within political theory. Focus is on topics such as power and authority, nation-state in a global world, sovereignty and control, gender and identity and human rights. By analyzing and understanding some of the common underlying assumptions and beliefs about human nature, society, and state, we will learn about the forces that shape our economic, social and political systems today.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
World Lang, Culture, Philos
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 266War and Peace in Northern Ireland3.00
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of various theories of the causes of conflict and conflict resolution within the general historical context of the rise and demise of the British Empire, and particularly the Northern Ireland question. Using those historical events and the questions they raise as a test-case, the course will try to come to some general conclusions about the nature and causes of ethnic conflict and how it differs from interstate conflict; the reasons for and methods of international intervention, including negotiation, arbitration, adjudication, and mediation; the factors that contribute to the success or failure of various methods of intervention and conflict resolution; the challenges involved in re-building societies after prolonged civil war; and the long-term prospects for fostering peace, security, justice, and human rights through such efforts. Code 2. RE.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Humanities-History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
POLS 289Political Science Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
POLS 299Wisconsin in Scotland1.00 - 17.00
Study Abroad
POLS 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements, consult your advisor. The course can be repeated only if content is different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
POLS 302Research in Political Science3.00
The course explores research methods and design used to study political phenomena, as well as the scope of political science as a field of inquiry. The study of research is meant to teach students how to evaluate existing empirical research, formulate their own research questions, and develop analytical strategies to evaluate those questions. By examining important political questions and research, the course aims to promote students' understanding of the value of political science as a discipline, and its contribution to the understanding of political dilemmas and existing power relations.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
POLS 330U.S. State and Local Government3.00
Comparative study of the political behavior and institutions of the state and local governments in the United States; current structural and functional problems confronting these political systems.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
POLS 345Theories of War and Peace3.00
This course examines various political theories in terms of their relevance to the question of war and peace. Specially, how does each theory define peace (negative or positive) what should be done to preserve and maintain peace; whether war is inevitable; and under what conditions is it legitimate to resort to war. The following "traditions" will be covered in the course; realism, liberalism, Marxism, globalization, feminism, post-colonialism, post-colonialism, post-modernism, constructivism, international justice, green, globalization and human security.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
POLS 352Paths to Peace3.00
The first part of the course examines how economic, social, political, environmental and legal policies facilitate movement towards peace in a broad context. The emphasis will be to link policies that enable us to move towards a more just world. The second part of this course examines various approaches to peace from simple peacekeeping to peacebuilding.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
POLS 353International Law3.00
The first part of this course examines how we define human rights by examining the treaties that serve as the foundation of human rights such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. This section also examines the various institutions that have been created to monitor and enforce these treaties such as the UN Human Rights Council and the European Court of Human Rights. The second part of the course examines the text of various international treaties that relate to subjects such as war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, torture, gender discrimination, racial discrimination, and refugees. The course will conclude with an evaluation of the emerging institutional framework to better monitor and enforce these laws, most notably the International Criminal Court.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
POLS 356Seminar in Peacebuilding3.00
This course examines how to approach a conflict and develop a strategy to not only end war but also enable the parties to live together. The war in Bosnia will be used as a case study to examine the roots of the conflict, examine the peace process , and its aftermath. Students will critically examine each part of the process and identify alternatives that result in a more robust peace in the region. Students are encouraged to apply what they learn about peacebuilding in Bosnia to resolve other conflicts.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 361Campaigns and Elections3.00
In a representative democracy, active participation in elections is essential to ensure elected officials remain faithful to constituent interests. Does this ideal adequately reflect the nature of elections in the current political system? This course is designed to expose students to the contemporary state of Congressional and Presidential campaigns in the American political system with focus on campaign strategy, the role of the media and campaign finance. The course also investigates contemporary elections, examining who votes and why, and the mechanics of the electoral process.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
POLS 372Power and Resistance3.00
This course explores the politics of power and resistance. It introduces different concepts of modern and pre-modern power and control, and examines instances of resistance from around the world, traversing different time periods, geographies, and cultures. Examples range from peasant revolts to labor movements, feminist struggles to antiwar mobilizations, prisoner uprisings to popular wars. The course inquires into the social forces involved, what they seek to resist, the methods and goals of resistance, and the reception of this resistance by its purported audience. This course incorporates theoretical and historical texts as well as visual material and movies.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
POLS 374Women and Politics3.00
In the United States, women hold 18% of the seats in the 112th Congress, marking the nation 85th in its level of representation for women. Globally, women constitute 15% of all members of parliament, although significant regional variation persists. How do gendered hierarchies continue to shape and structure political systems? Why have women not yet reached parity in elected office? Should women be represented as women? What difference do women bring to elective office? These and other questions are explored throughout the course, with particular attention to the historical exclusion of women from the public arena, the methods used by women to enter electoral and activist politics, and the current political status of women in the United States and globally. Cross-listed as POLS/GST 374.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
POLS 376Theories of Human Rights3.00
This course examines the nature and origin of human rights, as well as the conflicts and debates that result from the different understanding of the concept. We will explore questions such as; Are human rights individual or collective? Are they universal or should instead be understood as culturally sensitive? Do they include positive rights or only negative rights? And what about economic and social rights? Providing answers to these questions will allow us to understand our own political, economic, and social beliefs, as well as approaches that are different from ours. In order to answer these questions, the course will combine discussions about the concept of human rights with analyses of current cases of human rights violations around the world, including the origin of these violations, desired changes, politics, and effective actions.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
POLS 381Theories of Justice3.00
The course examines the different approaches to the concept of justice, in the attempt to help students develop their own critical thinking about the topic. The course overviews the leading contemporary conceptions and theories of justice - including utilitarian, libertarian, communitarian, deliberative-democratic, and feminist theories -, and focuses on the relationship between theories of justice and concepts of liberty and equality. The aim of this course is to examine the ways in which each of these different approaches to justice provides a different vision for the political, economic, and social life, and shapes different institutions and values.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
POLS 389Political Science Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
POLS 397American Conservative Thought3.00
The political debates between liberalism and conservatism are ardent. However, while these two terms are used freely and are attached to varied themes, their meaning is uncertain. Hence this class aims to introduce the students to the meaning of American conservatism. While defining conservatism, students will become familiar with the most relevant topics in the American Conservative Thought. The class introduces the political and philosophical heritage of conservatism, as well as examines themes that are relevant to contemporary American politics today. The focus will be on principles of conservatism, not on analyzing policies or proposals. Moreover, aiming to give a balanced view, a variety of perspectives that support and criticize American Conservatism will be presented.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
POLS 420Biotechnology Policy and Ethics3.00
Human reproductive cloning, genetic modification and alteration, personalized genomics, synthetic biology...these are only some of the areas of inquiry in the life sciences that have attracted public interest for their societal, ethical and policy implications. This course examines the political and ethical implications of selected areas of biotechnology that are now a part of the contemporary public debate with particular emphasis on the impact of these technologies on women. Some of the principles examined are legalistic, while others require ethical reasoning evaluating concepts such as human nature, personhood and autonomy. Key questions considered in this course include: Who benefits from these biotechnologies? Who are the primary actors engaged in policy creation? How can emerging technologies best be managed to balance individual freedom and scientific advancement with adequate protections for vulnerable classes? Finally, how do these technologies fit into our belief systems regarding the desirability of emerging biotechnologies in our individual lives and for society more generally?
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
POLS 456Feminist Theory and Action3.00
Seminar course providing a deeper look at feminist thought, building on the introduction provided in GST 150. Through readings and films, examines conversations, controversies, and connections among a range of feminist thinkers. Students explore the intersections of feminist thought and action, reading a variety of calls to action and articulating their own. Cross-listed as POLS/GST 456.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GST 150 or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 465Congress and the Presidency3.00
How have the contemporary Congress and President changed over the past two hundred years? Are these changes consistent with the intent of the Founding Fathers? Do we have an imperial Presidency? Why do Americans consistently approve of their member of Congress yet revile Congress as an institution? This course is designed to explore the historical evolution of the Executive and Legislative branches of government, while simultaneously considering the intention of the Founding Fathers. The nature of this interbranch relationship is evaluated through examination of the political parties, elections and the changing electoral and partisan environments.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
POLS 485Internship2.00 - 10.00
Structured and focused field experience in a public agency. Students will be assigned duties in various agencies. Prerequisites: Only students with a Political Science major or minor may enroll in this course. Written consent of the instructor must be obtained before registering for this course. Since the internship is an independent learning experience involving the cooperation and assistance of an outside agency, students should notify the instructor in writing of their interest in doing an internship early in the semester before the semester of the actual field experience.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
POLS 489Political Science Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
POLS 497Student Initiated Seminar1.00 - 3.00
The program offers a specially designed seminar or student-initiated seminar when there is sufficient interest. For further information, see the program coordinator.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
POLS 499Senior Seminar3.00
Either supervised research in selected subfields of the discipline, resulting in the submission of a formal research paper, or development and execution of a project designed to apply political or administrative concepts and skills to a particular situation, drawing upon the relevant professional literature and resulting in submission of a formal research and experience-evaluation paper. Projects devoted to the demonstration of skills may include, but need not be limited to: direct participation in a national, state or local political campaign; other activity on behalf of a political party or political interest group; involvement in university governance; service as an intern with a government agency or a private organization with a public interest; or an active leadership role in a campus or community organization. May be repeated once for a total of six credits. A minimum of three credits is required for Political Science majors in Liberal Arts or in Secondary Education. Other students may elect POLS 499 with the permission of the program coordinator. Consultation with the instructor must take place within the first two weeks of the semester. General Education requirements: Since Individualized Research or Applied Skills is both an independent learning and a capstone experience, the course satisfies the requirements of Category C, Co-requisites.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
 
SOCI - Sociology
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
SOCI 101Introduction to Sociology3.00
General introduction to the study of human relationships, group aspects of behavior and social institutions. Considers basic concepts and theories. Meets Wisconsin certification requirements for cooperative marketing and consumer's cooperatives.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SOCI 189Sociology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
SOCI 200Social Problems3.00
Critical survey of social institutions and social processes which conflict with or contradict human interests. Contemporary social issues (crime, inequality, economic and ecological crisis) are analyzed from a critical rather than utilitarian viewpoint.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SOCI 201Global Social Problems3.00
Explores and analyzes selected contemporary social issues relevant to the global community from a historical and sociological perspective. In the course of the investigation, students cultivate empathetic imagination about peoples unlike "us," learn basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and develop reflective and critical thinking skills.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SOCI 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/GST 210.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SOCI 266Global Change: Bali3.00
Media present the world as an ever smaller space of identical lives: Hyper-individuals produce for wages, consume for meaning, and do all of it in increasingly similar institutional landscapes. The island of Bali operates a different calendar focused on social groups, spiritual balance and "art." This Balinese "exotic" difference is a major travel market commodity. Can difference continue or is Bali becoming another homogenized experience to collect? Using seminar and lecture, the course helps students break naturalist and individualist conceptual blocks and use gateway concepts of institution, agency and culture. Class also provides preparation for optional SOCI 301 Study Abroad Bali.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SOCI 270Understanding and Appreciating Youth At-risk3.00
Provides a social science based foundation for understanding the social production of educational and social risk among young people. The foundation will in turn provide context and opportunities for students to learn about and work proficiently and effectively with youth who are at-risk. Students will examine, synthesize, internalize, and apply evidence-based techniques to work successfully with this population. As an Academic Service-Learning course, knowledge acquired through readings, mentoring, tutoring, and projects will be used to further understand, and then assist, the at-risk youth enrolled in the after school Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness in Superior (GEARS) program. Experiences acquired in the field (at Superior Middle School in the GEARS program) will be used to deepen, authenticate, and enhance the academics presented throughout the course. A strong, holistic understanding of adolescent development will be examined and applied. Impacts and implications at the micro, macro, and mezzo levels will be discussed. The on-going importance of citizenship involvement and its role for public policy for this population will be considered.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SOCI 273Race and Ethnicity3.00
Examines the social production of racial and ethnic categories as well as the practices that enact these categories. After examining the representation of these categories as "natural," the course uses local and global evidence to investigate the institutional and representational processes that historically create and modify race and ethnicity.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
SOCI 289Sociology Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
SOCI 300Chinese Societies3.00
Applies basic sociological concepts and theories to understand Chinese societies in different historical and spatial contexts. Compares and contrasts institutions and systems of meaning between and within these societies and concludes with social questions in contemporary Chinese societies. Required for SOCI 301 and ANTH 301 Study Abroad China Workshop.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Non-Western
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101 or ANTH 101.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SOCI 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements, consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if content is different.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101 and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
SOCI 303Sociology Of The Community3.00
Examines social changes, processes and institutions that contribute to the formation of human community. Emphasis given to emerging communities that promotes transformative ideas and practices at the local and global level. Involves a research project. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or instructor's approval.
Prerequisites:
SOCI 101 is a pre-requisite for this class
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
SOCI 369Sociology of Work3.00
Investigate the meaning, opportunities and conditions of work in relation to social processes and institutions. Special attention will be given to the impact of global capitalism and corporate dominance on the value of labor, workplace culture and labor organization. Also explores class implications of work. A research or academic service learning project is expected.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
SOCI 371Social Theory3.00
Inquiry into how social factors influence the thought of human beings; major trends and theorists contributing to the rise of sociological thought. Critically examines the work of classical, progressive, minority, and feminist theorists, looking not only at their conclusions, but also their assumptions, and their applicability to contemporary issues. Required for all majors and minors.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101 and 3 additional credits of Sociology.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SOCI 389Sociology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
SOCI 395Sociological Research Methods3.00
Introduction to social science epistemology, the design of research, conduct of research and the analysis of findings. Explores the use of survey, ethnography, in-depth interview, and archival, symbolic, and statistical analytic tools. This course is a prerequisite for the sociology capstone (SOCI 498).
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101 and a 3 additional credits in Sociology.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SOCI 423Environmental Sociology3.00
Investigation of the relationship between the natural world and social systems. We will place particular emphasis on the effect of growth-based economic systems on ecosystems, environmental social movements, and the structural nature of environmental problems and solutions.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of SOCI 101 is prerequisite for enrolling in this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SOCI 424Sociology of Education3.00
Exploration of how primary, secondary, and higher education systems in the United States are influenced by social, political, and economic factors. We will pay special attention to the role of education in reproducing class, gender, and racial inequality.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SOCI 427Sociology of Time3.00
Examination of the ways in which social activity creates kinds of time, experiences of time, as well as the consequences of social time. Emphasizes the ways in which institutions and systems of meaning incorporate ways of being into the body. Students explore time-keeping, calendars, social memory, planning and accounting as a means of understanding how the experiences of past, present and future are created. Students majoring in other disciplines are welcome.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SOCI 450The Construction of Race and Nationality3.00
In recent years scholarship on race and nationality has been revolutionized by a growing realization that racial and national identities are not fixed, but rather are social constructions that are fluid and changeable. This team-taught seminar examines the social, political and cultural processes through which race and nationality are formed. Cross-listed as HIST/SOCI 450. RE.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101 and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
SOCI 460Social Class3.00
Global examination of systematic social inequality. Core topics include causes, trends and contemporary patterns of social stratification, their effects upon social life, and philosophical perspectives on inequality.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Prerequisites:
Completion of SOCI 101 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
SOCI 464Social Change3.00
Survey of current sociology thinking concerning the nature and causes of global social change with a focus on the breakdown of the post-WWII compromise and the rise of corporate power. Course counts as a Global Studies Minor elective.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of SOCI 101 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SOCI 466Social Psychology-Sociology3.00
Examines the social production of perception, cognition, emotion and identity with an emphasis on cultural variation and institutional foundations.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
SOCI 475Gender and Globalization in Transnational Asia3.00
Investigates the impact of global capitalism on gender constructions in selected communities in/of Asia. Employing transnational feminist perspectives, course examines local and global social processes and consequences of shifting practices and ideology of gender. Cross-listed as SOCI/WST 475.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101 and a 3 additional credits in Sociology.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
SOCI 489Sociology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior.
SOCI 490Selected Topics in Sociology3.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in sociology selected by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when instructor and/or topics are different.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of SOCI 101 is prerequisite for enrolling in this course.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
SOCI 497Practice in Applied Sociology1.00 - 4.00
Integrates and extends classroom learning through a community-based service or work internship. Credit is granted when the student successfully completes an academic-service/work relationship. The academic component is crucial and credit will not be granted for service/work alone. For every one (1) credit, three (3) hours of service/work per week is expected.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101 and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
SOCI 498Thesis3.00
Guided research on a selected sociological topic. Each student produces a formal written research paper based on systematic investigation of sociological question. Individual work in consultation with a faculty thesis advisor will be balanced with collaborative discussions among all students writing theses. The capstone will be a public presentation of each student's research findings. Required of all Sociology majors.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 24 credits of Sociology including SOCI 101, SOCI 371, SOCI 395.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SOCI 499Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Supervised independent study and/or research in Sociology. Requires prior contract with instructor.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101 and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
SSED - Social Studies Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
SSED 189Social Studies Education Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
SSED 289Social Studies Education Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
SSED 389Social Studies Education Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
SSED 489Social Studies Education Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
WST - Women's Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
WST 406Construction of Gender in East Asia3.00
Advanced seminar course examining the construction of gender in East/Southeast Asia. The construction of gender is placed into a historical context of East Asia, with emphasis on how the nation-state, the family, and war/imperialism affected gender roles and norms. Although primarily focused on the modern period, the course examines the pre-modern context as means to assess the continuities and ruptures in gender roles. In addition, the course devotes more time to women's perspectives because women's voices historically have been marginalized; however, the course examines the construction of masculinity. Strong theoretical focus: construction of gender, the ideology of Orientalism, and the relationship of nationalism and gender. Extensive use of feature films and documentaries, primarily from East Asia, that complement the readings, and how to analyze film as a means to understand the construction of gender. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 406.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
WST 407History of Women and Work in the Pacific Rim3.00
Images of factory girls in sweat shops, under-aged prostitutes, and foreign nannies are prominent in portrayals of East Asia. This course investigates the history behind the how Asian women are racialized through a labor-class nexus, starting in the 19th century and continuing to the present. Some crucial questions will be: How did the state and media transform Asian concepts of gendered ethics to establish a cheap labor pool for emerging industries? How did mechanized wage labor change the status of women as workers? How did laborers mobilize and negotiate for better working and living conditions without unions? What types of subcultures emerged around “factory girl” communities? How did the trafficking of women’s bodies change over time? This course is designed to read East Asian films, history texts and fiction as a means to understand and analyze the past through aesthetic mediums. This course centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, critical thinking, and analytical essays. Code 5, RE, G. Cross-listed as HIST/WST 407.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
WST 475Gender and Globalization in Transnational Asia3.00
Investigates the impact of global capitalism on gender constructions in selected communities in/of Asia. Employing transnational feminist perspectives, course examines local and global social processes and consequences of shifting practices and ideology of gender. Cross-listed as SOCI/WST 475.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101 and a 3 additional credits in Sociology.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year

Social Inquiry Department Contact Information Top of Page

Social Inquiry Department
University of Wisconsin - Superior
Swenson Hall 3061
Belknap and Catlin Ave.
P.O. Box 2000
Superior, WI 54880
Phone: 715-394-8487
Email: si@uwsuper.edu