School of Business and Economics

Business and Economics Top of Page

The School of Business and Economics (SBE) offers undergraduate majors in:

  • Business Administration (non-comprehensive major, requires another major or non-SBE minor)
  • Economics (non-comprehensive major, requires another major or non-SBE minor)
  • Sustainable Management (comprehensive online major)
  • Transportation and Logistics Management

The School also offers a Business Minor (requires a non-SBE major) and Master degrees in:

  • Sustainable Management (online)
  • Data Science (online)

Admission Policies Top of Page

Admission to the SBE undergraduate programs:

Students who are pursuing an SBE major or minor must be admitted to the School of Business and Economics prior to enrolling in most 300/400 level business courses. To ensure a timely graduation, students who wish to be admitted to 300/400 level business courses must establish their eligibility by completing the SBE Admission Application during the preceding academic term. Students planning admission to the SBE should contact the SBE office in Erlanson 301 and arrange to be advised by an SBE faculty member.

Students pursuing a major in Sustainable Management should consult the Academic Program Director with questions pertaining to admission to this program.

Admission to the SBE graduate programs:

Students pursuing graduate degrees should consult their respective Academic Program Directors with questions pertaining to admission to these programs.

Mission Top of Page

The mission of the School of Business and Economics is to build on the students' liberal arts foundation using a dynamic interactive curriculum that prepares tomorrow's business leaders.

Sustainable Management Admission Requirements Top of Page

The Bachelor of Science in Sustainable Management is a completely online degree completion program. It is offered by four University of Wisconsin campuses: UW-Parkside, UW-River Falls, UW-Stout, and UW-Superior. Created for working adults, the program allows students to apply previously earned credits (or an associate's degree) toward the online Sustainable Management bachelor's degree. You are required to take each of the 21 courses in the curriculum. There are no electives and, because of the unique nature of the program, no other courses may be substituted for courses in the curriculum.

For admission into the program, students are required to have completed:

  • 60 credits of undergraduate coursework or an associate's degree with a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or greater
  • The UW-Superior General Education requirements
  • The following prerequisites:
    • College Algebra (MATH 102 Intermediate Algebra or an equivalent course)
    • Statistics (MATH 130 Elementary Statistics or an equivalent course)
    • General Chemistry (CHEM 105 General Chemistry I or an equivalent course)
    • Introductory Biology (BIOL 111 Plants and People, BIOL 123 Concepts in Biology, or BIOL 130 Principles of Biology I or an equivalent course)
    • Speech/Introduction to Communication (COMM 110 Intro to Communication or an equivalent course)

SBE Minor Admission Requirements Top of Page

The Business Minor is available to all students with a non-SBE major.

Students with a Business Minor must be admitted to the School of Business and Economics prior to enrolling in 300/400-level business courses. To be admitted, students must first:

  1. Earn all overall grade point average of 2.3 prior to applying for admission to the SBE.
  2. Complete the following courses with a grade point average of at least 2.0 with no grade lower than C-: ACCT 101; BUS 211; ECON 235 and FIN 210.
  3. Complete the following:
  • MATH 112 or 115 or 130 or 151 or 230 or 240; or CSCI 101 or 201 or 211
  • WRIT 101 and WRIT 102
  • COMM 110 or COMM 211
  • All but 12 credits of the remaining General Education requirements.

The following courses can be taken prior to being admitted to the SBE but only after completing the necessary course prerequisites:

  • BUS 270, prerequisite ITS 108
  • ECON 330 and ECON 333, prerequisite ECON 235

Conditional Admission

Students who do not meet all admission requirements can be considered for conditional admission if:

  1. Requirements will be completed during the semester that admission is applied for, or
  2. The student files an SBE Appeals Petition detailing unusual and compelling circumstances to support a conditional admission and the petition is approved by the Appeals Committee (see SBE staff in Erlanson 301 for help with the petition process).

Note: Credits earned in MATH 151 or MATH 240 will apply toward the General Education mathematics requirement.

Exceptions for Taking Upper-level SBE Courses without Being Admitted to the SBE Top of Page

Students who have completed ECON 235 can enroll in all 300/400 level economics courses without being admitted to the SBE.

Non-SBE majors, with at least junior level status, may enroll in the following courses without being admitted to SBE: ACCT 365; BUS 301, 306, 363, 370, 380, 382, 411, 430, 499; TRSP 402. Obtain drop/add form online and consult the SBE staff in Erlanson 301 on how to obtain the necessary signatures.

Residency Requirement Top of Page

All students including transfer students, who wish to earn a degree from UW-Superior with a comprehensive major offered by the SBE must complete at least 18 of the credits associated with upper-division (300/400 level) major requirements at UW-Superior.  At least nine of the 18 credits must be earned in courses other than BUS 306, 370, 380, 495 and FIN 320.

Students who wish to earn a non-comprehensive major (minor required) in the SBE must complete at least 12 of the credits associated with upper division (300/400 level) major requirements at UW-Superior.

Internships Top of Page

The SBE faculty believes a well-designed and meaningful work experience, which builds on the academic foundation provided by a college education, can greatly enhance the total learning experience and facilitate the transition from college to the business world. Academic credits awarded for the internship range from two to seven credits. Students interested in receiving credit for internship should contact the SBE internship coordinator or SBE staff in Erlanson 301 for additional details.

Courses Offered Only Once Each Year Top of Page

Students should make special note of the following courses, which are required for the School of Business and Economics students and are generally offered no more than once a year. The specific semesters during which the various courses are offered are indicated in the class schedule published online. Normally offered fall semester: ACCT 351, 352, 355, 361, 464, 467; BUS 375, 382, 405, 474, 482; ECON 330, 333, 350, 430; FIN 210, 420; TRSP 315, 401, 405; GEOG 302; LSTU 303. Normally offered spring semester: ACCT 101, 353, 357, 359, 461, 462, 365, 466; BUS 363, 371, 373, 411, 475, 484; ECON 335, 351, 435, 470; FIN 321, 426; TRSP 300, 305, 325, 430. GEOG 302 and LSTU 303 are required for Transportation and Logistics Management Majors.

Courses Offered Only Once Every Two Years: Top of Page

Students should make special note of the following courses, which are generally offered no more than once every two years. Students should check the class schedule published online to determine when the following courses are offered. TRSP 402/GEOG 402, BUS 340, 341, 411, 475, 477, 483; ECON 335, 362

Courses More than Seven Years Old at Time of Graduation: Top of Page

Students who plan to graduate with an SBE major should be aware that the SBE retains the option to require the student to repeat any course(s) that will be more than seven years old at the time of graduation. This policy applies to any courses used to satisfy major requirements, regardless of the college or university that granted the credit initially. This policy is of particular importance to transfer and re-entry students who have the responsibility to obtain a ruling from the SBE Appeals Committee on whether a course more than seven years old needs to be repeated.

Majors Top of Page

Minors Top of Page

Certificates Top of Page

Course Descriptions Top of Page

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ACCT - Accounting
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ACCT 101Accounting for Nonbusiness Majors3.00
Introduction to the areas of financial accounting and managerial accounting. Basic financial statement preparation and analysis. Uses of accounting information by managers in the decision making process. Not open to students with majors in business. No Pass-Fail.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 189Accounting Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ACCT 200Financial Accounting3.00
Introduction to concepts of reporting financial information of sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations to interested parties. Includes discussion of cash, receivables, inventories, plant assets, intangible assets, current and long-term liabilities and investments. Cash flow information is also discussed.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ACCT 201Managerial Accounting3.00
Discusses basic concepts of costs in developing information for management use in decision making. Topics include CVP analysis, budgeting, cost allocations, and performance measurement.
Prerequisites:
ACCT 200 with a grade of C- or higher.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ACCT 212Field Studies In Accounting1.00 - 3.00
Pass-Fail only. Provides presently enrolled freshmen and sophomores an opportunity to apply general accounting knowledge to selected accounting projects. Prerequisites: Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ACCT 288Independent Study in Accounting1.00 - 3.00
Pass-Fail only. Concentrated study of various accounting problems. Course may be repeated. Students can earn a maximum of 12 credits. Credits earned cannot be used to satisfy requirements for the accounting major. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ACCT 289Accounting Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ACCT 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by department faculty to give students direct experience in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ACCT 351Accounting for Not-For-Profit Entities3.00
Accounting theory and practice applicable to governmental units, hospitals, universities, and other not-for-profit organizations.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ACCT 352Intermediate Accounting I3.00
First in a two-course sequence providing in-depth study of accounting theory and practice. Topics include financial statements, present value techniques, current assets, current liabilities, long-term assets.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ACCT 353Intermediate Accounting II3.00
Continuation of ACCT 352. Includes long-term liabilities, stockholders' equity, earnings per share, deferred income taxes, pensions, leases, accounting changes, and the statement of cash flows.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and ACCT 352
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 355Cost Accounting3.00
In-depth study of concepts and techniques related to cost accumulation and reporting, cost control, and profit planning. Also covers the relationship of cost accounting to decision making.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ACCT 357Accounting Information Systems3.00
Examination of how accounting information of an organization is gathered, processed, stored, and distributed.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 359Topics in Accounting3.00
Examination of the accounting practices of complex revenue recognition issues, interest capitalization, asset retirement obligations, loan impairments, troubled debt restructuring, complex compensation issues, foreign currency transactions, derivative instruments, and hedging transactions.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 361Fundamentals of Taxation3.00
Comprehensive study of income tax concepts, regulations, and tax-planning principles as they relate to individuals and business.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ACCT 365Fraud Examination and Investigation3.00
A study of a variety of topics dealing with fraud and forensic accounting. Examines the nature of fraud, management fraud, fraud prevention, detection, investigation, and legal follow-up. Case studies and research methods are utilized.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or non-SBE majors are required to be at Junior status (obtain drop/add form from a SBE-authorized representative, Erlanson Hall, Room 301).
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 388Independent Study in Accounting1.00 - 9.00
Topics course. Concentrated study of Accounting Technologies, QuickBooks, or International Accounting. Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and consent of cooperating instructor.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
ACCT 389Accounting Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ACCT 400Accounting Internship2.00 - 7.00
Pass-Fail only. Opportunity for students to earn academic credit by extending classroom learning to real-world settings. Students obtain the cooperation of an employer and prepare a learning contract. Course may be repeated. Students can earn a maximum of 14 credits. Credits earned cannot be used to satisfy requirements for the accounting major.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and consent of coopering instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ACCT 412Field Studies in Accounting1.00 - 3.00
Provides non-traditional adult learners with some academic and/or broad business experiences and presently enrolled juniors and seniors an opportunity to apply general business knowledge to selected business projects. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and consent of coopering instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ACCT 461Business Taxation3.00
Taxation of corporations, partnerships, estates, trusts, and gift taxation.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 462Advanced Financial Accounting3.00
Applications of accounting theory to business combinations, partnerships, multinational companies, and other miscellaneous topics.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 464Auditing Principles3.00
Introduction to professional auditing and the study of audit examinations which precede the attestation of the fairness of financial statements.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ACCT 466Senior Project in Accounting2.00
Capstone course which integrates the various areas of accounting related to a business and includes a senior experience component.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 467Tax Research1.00
Introduction to the techniques required to research tax issues.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of ACCT 361 or ACCT 460.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ACCT 489Accounting Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
BUS - Business
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
BUS 100Introduction To Business3.00
Introduction to the organization and operation of business enterprises; a survey of management, finance, distribution, production, risk, business law, and other business activities. Designed for students who are undecided about a major. Closed to students admitted as majors in the School of Business and Economics.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 189Business Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BUS 211Business Law I3.00
Legal principles relating to business transactions. Includes the legal and social environment of business, contracts, choice of business entities, and selected elements of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 212Field Studies in Business1.00 - 3.00
Provides non-traditional adult learners with limited business experience and presently enrolled freshmen and sophomores opportunity to apply general business knowledge to selected business projects. Pass-Fail only. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 270Business Statistics3.00
Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to business situations. Includes tabular, graphical and numerical summary measures; probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; hypothesis testing; analysis of variance; and regression/correlation analysis.
Prerequisites:
ITS 108 with a grade of C- or higher or consent of cooperating instructor. Pre-requisites do not apply to ECON Majors
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 288Independent Study In Business1.00 - 3.00
Concentrated study of various business problems. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 289Business Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BUS 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 306Quantitative Models for Production and Operations Management3.00
Application of basic quantitative and qualitative techniques for problem solving in production/operations management. Includes linear programming, transportation and network models, inventory models, queuing models, project management, forecasting and decision theory.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or non-SBE majors are required to be at Junior status (obtain drop/add form from a SBE-authorized representative, Erlanson Hall, Room 301).
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 340Hospitality Management3.00
Exploration of the major components and organization structure of the hospitality industry. Presents historical development, opportunities and current trends. Stresses the importance and relationships of education and work experience to career success. Examination of the key components in various industry sectors, including food service, lodging, gaming and property management.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BUS 341Event Management3.00
Planning, organizing and the management of events will be investigated for the hospitality, tourism and sports industries. Emphasis is placed on the design, internal management systems and post event evaluation.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
BUS 363Business Ethics and Social Responsibility3.00
Explores moral and ethical theories such as ethical fundamentalism. Theories are then applied to "real world" situations in the United States and around the globe. Covers classic cases in business ethics, current cases and trends such as Sarbanes-Oxley and the social responsibility of business. Especially useful for students studying management, finance, marketing, accounting, and international business.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or non-SBE majors are required to be at Junior status (obtain drop/add form from a SBE-authorized representative, Erlanson Hall, Room 301).
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BUS 370Principles Of Marketing3.00
Introduction to terms, definitions and concepts integral to the strategic planning and decision-making involving the components of the marketing mix: product, price, promotion, and physical distribution. Emphasis on market analysis, delivering value and establishing competitive advantage. Coverage of current trends in marketing.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or non-SBE majors are required to be at Junior status (obtain drop/add form from a SBE-authorized representative, Erlanson Hall, Room 301).
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 371Consumer Behavior3.00
Application of concepts from the disciplines of psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics that affect purchase decisions of individuals. Current literature in consumer psychology is explored in its relation to marketing strategy.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BUS 373Principles of Advertising3.00
Introduction to advertising management, research, planning, and the creative process. Topics covered include market segmentation and targeting, account planning, working with clients, advertising research, advertising strategy, developing art and copy, media selection and budgeting (print, broadcast, social media) plus integrating advertising in the marketing mix.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370 or COMM 170, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BUS 375Public Relations3.00
Introduction to principles, theories and skills of public relations, including a study of its problems, impact and potential.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370 or COMM 170, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BUS 377Hospitality, Tourism & Travel Marketing3.00
Principles of marketing for the hospitality, tourism and travel industries. Covers marketing strategies & tactics for hotels, restaurants, tourist attractions, convention & visitor bureaus, tour operators & related products & services. Topics include the unique characteristics of travel & tourism, consumer behavior, market segmentation, product development, internal marketing, pricing, yield management, sales channels, & marketing communications. The vacation, personal travel & business travel market segments are examined.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the SBE Department or Instructor Consent are prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 380Principles Of Management3.00
Introduction to the basic tools and requisite knowledge associated with businesses and their management as well as the broad concepts associated with the challenges of managing within organizations. Examines various management functions, and gains in-depth understanding of the working and behavioral complexities that arise in organizations.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or non-SBE majors are required to be at Junior status (obtain drop/add form from a SBE-authorized representative, Erlanson Hall, Room 301).
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 382Human Resource Management3.00
Examines current theoretical and research developments related to human resource management and human resource practices as they relate to the planning, recruitment, selection, training, and management of the human resources within an organization.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or non-SBE majors are required to be at Junior status (obtain drop/add form from a SBE-authorized representative, Erlanson Hall, Room 301).
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BUS 389Business Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BUS 400Business Internship2.00 - 7.00
Opportunity for students to earn academic credit by extending classroom learning to area business settings. Students obtain the cooperation of an employer and prepare a learning contract. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE, consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
BUS 405Entrepreneurship3.00
Study of entrepreneurship with an emphasis on small business. Topics include business plan preparation, forms of organization, financing options and management problem solving.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BUS 411Advanced Business Law3.00
Selected topics in business law, including international business law, transportation law and alternative dispute resolution. Course is taught through the use of case studies.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 211 or consent of instructor. Non-SBE majors are required to be at Junior status (obtain a Drop/Add form from a SBE-authorized representative, Erlanson Hall, Room 301).
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
BUS 412Field Studies in Business1.00 - 3.00
Provides non-traditional adult learners with limited business experience and presently enrolled freshmen and sophomores opportunity to apply general business knowledge to selected business projects. Pass-Fail only. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the SBE Department or Instructor Consent are prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 430International Business3.00
The course covers international activities of small and medium-sized firms as well as large multinational corporations. Topics include trade strategies, doing business with newly emerging market economies and the functional areas of international business management. Emphasis on the importance of cross-cultural communication.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or non SBE majors: junior status (obtain drop/add from SBE authorized representative, Erlanson Hall 301).
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 474Retail Marketing3.00
Principles of establishing and operating a retail business. Topics include retail market analysis and research, store layout, atmospherics, merchandising, pricing, sales, advertising, promotion, inventory management, and examination of current trends. Emphasis on retail strategy and the evolution of shopping culture.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BUS 475Professional Selling and Sales Management3.00
Study of the theories and applications of professional selling and sales management. Development of persuasive communications strategies for specific applications. Emphasis on organizational and presentation skills to provide students with opportunities for practical sales experience.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
BUS 477Internet Marketing3.00
Classroom and field experience integrating internet marketing concepts with traditional marketing activities. Internet marketing and social media supporting marketing communication strategies. Student interaction with regional and community business enterprises. Emphasis on practical application.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370 or COMM 170, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BUS 482Marketing Research3.00
Designed to help students become intelligent users of marketing research information. Introduction to the variety of qualitative and quantitative methods available to assist marketing managers in decision-making. Explores alternative methods available to collect and analyze data.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BUS 483Organization Behavior and Development3.00
Advanced study of organizations, the impact of human factors and management principles, and organization development is used to direct and manage change. Course is designed to build one's understanding of the theories and concepts for managing human behavior in organizations. Focus on case analysis and class exercises. Prerequisites: BUS 380.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE & BUS 380
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
BUS 484Marketing Strategy and Brand Management3.00
Designed to assist students in applying knowledge and analytical skills in comprehensive marketing strategy development. Integration of decisions regarding all dimensions of the marketplace offering. Analysis of challenges facing marketing managers. Emphasis on utilizing a structured planning process to achieve marketing goals.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BUS 488Independent Study1.00 - 3.00
Concentrated study of various business problems.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE, consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 489Business Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BUS 495Strategic Management (Capstone)3.00
Integrative approach to the formulation and implementation of strategy within business or administrative type organizations. Capstone course drawing on the functional analytical tools, managerial concepts and techniques developed in previous business administration and economics courses and includes a senior experience component.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370, BUS 380, and FIN 320.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 499Seminar in Business1.00 - 4.00
Studies of recent trends and practices in business and business education.
Prerequisites:
Junior-level status.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
ECON - Economics
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ECON 189Economics Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
ECON 235Economics in Society3.00
General introductory course highlighting economic and social issues facing society markets and prices, international trade, consumers and firms’ behavior, provision of government services, primarily oriented toward students outside business and economics, including social work, sociology, history, political science, education and the natural sciences.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 250Principles Of Microeconomics3.00
The role of households, firms, and industries in the use of resources. Survey of consumption, production, markets, price determination, and industrial organization including competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly. Policy issues and undergraduate research.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 251Principles Of Macroeconomics3.00
Survey of national income accounts, employment theory, economic growth, fiscal and monetary policy, money and banking, inflation and international trade. Policy issues and undergraduate research.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 289Economics Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ECON 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ECON 330Money and Banking3.00
Overview of the U.S. financial system, its role in U.S. economic performance, and its ties to global capital markets. Topics include: role of money, financial intermediaries and markets in the economy, general history and rationale for depository regulation, structure and functions of the Federal Reserve, analysis of current economic events and monetary policy.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ECON 333Transportation Economics3.00
Introductory course focuses on domestic transportation, but an international dimension is included. Covers all modes of transportation, their micro-economic and organizational characteristics, role and function in the national economy, regulatory and policy issues, rate setting, interaction in the supply chain, shipper and carrier relations, intermodal operations and environmental impacts.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ECON 335Ecological Economics3.00
Sustainability and sustainable development examined within an ecological economics context. Builds on core economic concepts particularly market failure and addresses issues of sustainable scale, just distribution, and efficient allocation. Emphasizes the relationship between socioeconomic systems and the biological/physical world. Explores the policy challenges of sustainability in a variety of contexts including climate change, energy use, natural resource use, ecosystem services, food security, technological change and property rights.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
ECON 350Intermediate Microeconomics3.00
Economic theory in the analysis of household, firm, and industry behavior. Includes demand, supply, production functions, price theory, industrial organization, factor markets, general equilibrium, and welfare economics; policy issues.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or Econ 235
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ECON 351Intermediate Macroeconomics3.00
Economic theory in the analysis of aggregate economic behavior. Topics Include national income determination and income inequality across countries, economic growth, technological progress, unemployment, inflation, economic booms and recessions, and stabilization policies.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or Econ 235
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ECON 362Public Finance3.00
Theoretical foundation and institutional role of government in the economy. Includes theory of social goods and public decisions, the budgeting process, and the impact of taxation and expenditure on the allocation of resources, distribution of income, and economic stability.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
ECON 389Economics Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ECON 400Economics Internship2.00 - 7.00
Opportunity for students to earn academic credit by extending classroom learning to real-world settings. Students must obtain the cooperation of an employer and prepare an internship agreement. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
ECON 350, 351 and consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ECON 430International Economics3.00
Overview of the economic interactions between countries in areas of international trade and international finance. Topics include: theories of trade, protectionist policies, trade agreements, economic integration, role of international institutions and multinational enterprises, balance of payments, foreign exchange rates, current international macroeconomics and monetary policy.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ECON 435Development Economics3.00
Nature and process of economic development within historical and international perspectives. Includes alternative theories and strategies of economic development; recent changes and trends in the world economy, and implications for development at the national level; selected case studies and applications.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ECON 438Comparative Economic Systems3.00
Analysis and development of various forms of economic organization and decision mechanisms at the societal level. Emphasis on modern centralized, decentralized, and mixed economies; evaluation of economic performance; case studies.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ECON 470Applied Economic Analysis3.00
Introduction to econometric theory and practice. Course includes lectures and data analysis workshops, a senior-year experience/capstone component. Topics include: statistical inference, regression analysis, model building and problems in regression analysis.
Prerequisites:
BUS 270 or MATH 130 or its equivalent, ECON 350 or ECON 351, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ECON 481Seminar in Economic Issues3.00
In-depth discussion of current economic issues. While the focus will be on the economic aspects, social as well as political elements will be included. Various policy options will be developed, discussed, and analyzed.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ECON 488Independent Study In Economics1.00 - 3.00
Concentrated study of various economics issues.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250, 251 or 235 or consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ECON 489Economics Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
FIN - Finance
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FIN 189Finance Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FIN 210Personal Finance3.00
Examines the basic principles and concepts of personal financial planning, purpose and operation of financial markets and institutions, economic impact of financial literacy, and behavioral aspects of personal finance. Decisions relating to money management, credit and borrowing, real estate ownership, savings, and investment are studied from the standpoint of the individual consumer. Recommended for non-business majors.
General Education Requirements (2016-17 and Prior Catalogs):
Social Sciences
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FIN 212Field Studies In Finance1.00 - 3.00
Provides non-traditional adult learners with limited business experiences and presently enrolled freshmen and sophomores an opportunity to apply general business knowledge to selected business projects. Pass-Fail only. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FIN 288Independent Study in Finance1.00 - 3.00
Concentrated study of various business problems.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FIN 289Finance Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FIN 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different. Consent of cooperating instructor and director. SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
FIN 320Principles Of Finance3.00
Examines the basic principles and concepts of financial management. Topics include time value of money, security, valuation, risk, financial analysis and planning, working capital management, cost of capital, capital structure and capital budgeting,
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
FIN 321Managerial Finance3.00
Advanced concepts and techniques of financial management, emphasizing the overall environment and decision making process by financial managers. Topics include: modern portfolio theory, capital structure theory, and case studies.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and FIN 320.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FIN 389Finance Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FIN 400Finance Internship2.00 - 7.00
Opportunity for students to earn academic credit by extending classroom learning to current area business settings. Students obtain the cooperation of an employer and prepare a learning contract. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE, consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
FIN 412Field Studies In Finance1.00 - 3.00
Provides non-traditional adult learners with some academic and/or broad business experiences and presently enrolled juniors and seniors an opportunity to apply general business knowledge to selected business projects. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and consent of coopering instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FIN 420Principles of Insurance and Risk Management3.00
Principles of risk insurance and their application to business management and personal affairs. Includes risk identification, diversification and management, as well as retirement planning, employee benefits, annuities and various types of insurance, such as life, health, fire, automobile and general liability insurance.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and FIN 320, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FIN 426Investments3.00
The study of financial securities, their valuation, and the markets where they are traded. Analyze economic and market factors affecting risk, returns, and timing of investment decisions. Examine investment decision making within the framework of modern portfolio theory. Alternative investments including derivatives (options and futures) are also examined.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and FIN 320 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FIN 488Independent Study-Finance1.00 - 3.00
Concentrated study of various business problems.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE, consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FIN 489Finance Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
SMGT - Sustainable Management
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
SMGT 115Environmental Science and Sustainability3.00
Overview of the interrelationships between humans and the environment. The first third of the course focuses on important ecological concepts. The remainder deals with human influence on the environment and sustainable practices to avoid or ameliorate the negative impacts. The ecological concepts are used throughout to identify, understand, and provide a basis for proposing possible solutions to contemporary environmental problems. Overall, the course provides students with a better understanding of how humans can more positively affect the environment in which they live. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Sustainable Management major, or consent of the Program Advisor, and on a space-available basis.
SMGT 220Systems Thinking3.00
In this course students will use systems thinking to apply the concept of sustainability in various business, social, and scientific contexts. Rather than looking at problems by analyzing their component parts, students will learn to analyze whole systems. Students then model the relationships and behaviors to identify leverage points for change. No Pass-Fail.
SMGT 230Triple Bottom Line Accounting for Managers3.00
Introduction to the discipline of financial and managerial accounting and how this information is used. Students gain a basic knowledge of the preparation of financial statements and their analytical use. Further, students will explore how this accounting information is applied by managers in the decision-making process, helping organizations meet the triple bottom line (strong profits, healthy environment, and vital communities). No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
College Algebra (MATH 102, 113 or equivalent) and admission to the Sustainable Management Major, or consent of the Program Advisor, and on a space-available basis.
SMGT 235Economics in Society and Sustainability3.00
General introductory course highlighting economic, social, and environmental issues facing society. In addition to covering traditional issues such as markets and prices (microeconomics), government economic management (macroeconomics), and international trade, it introduces economic content into the analysis of selected topics such as poverty and discrimination, the environment, and the provision of government services. Critiques of conventional economic thought, within the context of systems thinking and ecological economics, are integrated throughout the course. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
College Algebra (MATH 102, 113 or equivalent) and admission to the Sustainable Management Major, or consent of the Program Advisor, and on a space-available basis.
SMGT 240Technical Writing for Sustainable Management3.00
The psychology and mechanics of written communications are thoroughly explored and widely applied. Also included are non-written applications in such business areas as international/intercultural, nonverbal, and ethical communications related to sustainability. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Sustainable Management major, or consent of the Program Advisor, and on a space-available basis.
SMGT 310Ecology and Sustainability3.00
Interrelationships of organisms with each other and their environments. Investigation into composition and dynamics of populations, communities, ecosystems, landscapes, and the biosphere with emphasis on sustainability. Online only. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
BIOL 123 or equivalent, or consent of the Program Advisor, and on a space-available basis.
SMGT 315Global Environmental Chemistry3.00
Exploration of chemical environments as interdependent thermodynamics and kinetic systems. The "system/surroundings" perspectives of thermodynamics will be applied to systems of progressively larger size to arrive at the comprehensive view of the global environmental system. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
General Chemistry (CHEM 103, CHEM 105 or equivalent) and admission to the Sustainable Management Major or Program Advisor permission and on a space available basis.
SMGT 320Energy for Sustainable Management3.00
Students learn to apply basic engineering principles to existing and emerging energy technologies to provide a better understanding of energy production, consumption, and environmental impact; and how these principles relate to sustainable management. Topics cover a wide range of energy systems including nuclear, fossil fuels, wind, solar, biofuels and biomass. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
College Algebra (MATH 102, 113 or equivalent) and General Chemistry (CHEM 103, CHEM 105 or equivalent) and admission to the Sustainable Management Major, or Program Advisor permission, and on a space-available basis.
SMGT 325Natural Resource Management3.00
Examines the interdependence between natural resources associated with land, air, and water. Explores significant environmental issues regarding the policies and problems in the use and management of natural resources related to soils, vegetation, landscape within the context of social needs and sustainability. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
SMGT 235 and admission to the Sustainable Management Major, or consent of the Program Advisor, and on a space-available basis.
SMGT 330Marketing for a Sustainable World3.00
An analysis of an organization's opportunities to develop sustainability practices as they relate to the development of product, pricing, supply and distribution channels (retail, wholesale), promotion (advertising, sales promotion, public relations) and target markets. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
SMGT 235, and admission to the Sustainable Management Major, or consent of the Program Advisor, and on a space-available basis.
SMGT 331Sustainable Organizational Finance3.00
Introduction to the theory and methods of sustainable organizational finance. Topics include financial statements; discounting and budgeting; uncertainty and risk/reward trade-offs; and assessing the financial implications of the triple bottom line (e.g. climate change, carbon trading, human resource management, and creating environmentally-conscious shareholder value). No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
SMGT 230, and SMGT 235, and admission to the Sustainable Management Major; or permission of the program advisor. Offered on a space-available basis.
SMGT 332Economics of Environmental Sustainability3.00
Examines the interaction between market activity and the environment, applies economic analysis to the efficient and sustainable management of environmental goods and resources, and examines how economic institutions and polices can be changed to bring the environmental impacts of economic decision-making more into balance with human desires and the needs of the ecosystem. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
SMGT 235, and admission to the Sustainable Management Major; or permission of the program advisor. Offered on a space-available basis
SMGT 335Management and Environmental Information Systems3.00
Use of the computer as a problem-solving tool, as part of data processing systems; information systems and decision support tools for managers; information systems planning and development; overview of computer hardware, software, database management, networking and web technologies; green data centers; energy efficient trends in information technology; data and information usage in green businesses. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
SMGT 230, and admission to the Sustainable Management Major, or consent of the Program Advisor, on a space-available basis.
SMGT 340Organizational Behavior and Sustainability3.00
Management principles and theories underlying human behavior in organizations are investigated. Topics include personality, motivation, communication, decision-making, leadership, teamwork, ethics, power, diversity, and work stress. Constraints and opportunities of an "eco" friendly organization are realized. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
COMM 110 (or its equivalent), admission to the Sustainable Management Major, or have consent of the Program Advisor, on space-available basis.
SMGT 350Operations Management and Sustainability3.00
Introduction to the role of the operations function in an organization; linear programming; continuous and intermittent production processes; aggregate planning; inventory control; materials management; scheduling; project management; quality assurance; operations for green enterprises. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
College Algebra, MATH 102 or MATH 113 (or its equivalent) Statistics, MATH 130 (or its equivalent), admission to the Sustainable Management Major, and BUS 270 or consent of the Program Advisor on a space-available basis.
SMGT 360Environmental and Sustainability Policy3.00
Topics include the spectrum of historical, theoretical and technical issues applicable to sustainable management of natural resources, environmental quality standards and risk management. Identifies administrative structures that form the basis for selecting appropriate responses to complex management problems faced by industry, government and non-governmental agencies. The historical development and current framework of public policy are investigated and specific foundational legislation is critiqued. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
SMGT 115 and admission to the Sustainable Management Major, or consent of Program Advisor, on a space-available basis.
SMGT 370Logistics, Supply Chain Management, and Sustainability3.00
Introduction to the concepts, functions, processes, and objectives of logistics and supply chain management activities. Covers activities that are involved in physically moving raw materials, inventory, and finished goods from point of origin to point of use or consumption. Covers the planning, organizing, and controlling of such activities, and examines the role of supply chain processes in creating sustainable competitive advantage with respect to quality, flexibility, lead-time, and cost. Topics include customer service, inventory management, transportation, warehousing, supply chain management, reverse logistics, green supply chains and international logistics. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
SMGT 350 and admission to the Sustainable Management Major, or consent of the Program Advisor, on a space-available basis.
SMGT 430International Management for a Sustainable World3.00
Analysis of the theory and practice of managing international organizations. Includes sociocultural aspects and group dynamics of international business and service organizations through the study of sustainable management practices. Implementation of a triple bottom line solution to organizational problems will be emphasized. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
SMGT 235 and admission to the Sustainable Management Major, or consent of the Program Advisor, and on a space-available basis.
SMGT 435International Development and Sustainability3.00
Historical roots of the idea of development, economic theories of growth and their implications for sustainability, and interrelationships between population growth, food security, poverty, inequality, urbanization, technological change, international trade and environmental change at local, regional and global scales. Contemporary issues and alternatives. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
SMGT 235 and admission to the Sustainable Management Major, or consent of the Program Advisor, and on a space-available basis.
SMGT 460Environment and Society3.00
Introduce the fundamentals of human-environmental interaction; a grasp of how these interactions create problems; and how the elements of social, technological, and personal choices combine to overcome them. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
SMGT 115 and admission to the Sustainable Management Major, or consent of the Program Advisor, and on a space-available basis.
SMGT 495Sustainable Management Capstone3.00
An application and study of sustainable management through the solution of an industry-based project. Implementation of a triple bottom line solution to industrial problems will be emphasized. No Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
Senior standing, advisor consent and must be admitted to SMGT major, or have program advisor consent, on a space-available basis.
 
TRSP - Transportation & Logistics Management
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
TRSP 300Supply Chain Management3.00
Introduction to concepts, functions, processes and objectives of logistics and supply chain management activities including procurement, manufacturing, and logistics. Covers planning, organizing and controlling of such activities, and examines the role of supply chain processes in creating competitive advantage with respect to quality, flexibility, lead-time, and cost. Provides an analysis of logistics and transportation services. Topics include customer service, inventory concepts and management, transportation, warehousing, purchasing, supply chain management, global logistics, sustainability, and logistics strategies.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
TRSP 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
TRSP 305Air Transportation Management3.00
Explores the history, management and future trends in air transportation. Covers the four principal segments of air transportation: major carriers, regional carriers, all-cargo carriers and general aviation. Also examines airport management. In each segment the issues of aircraft design, market share, finance, insurance and operations are discussed. The development and application of national and international regulations that impact air transportation are analyzed. Topics include: cost structure, air fares, flight crews and safety, environmental impacts of aircraft and airports, operating and service characteristics, technological advances, world competition and intermodal operations.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
TRSP 315Land Transportation Management3.00
Covers the three basic surface transportation modes of rail, highway systems and pipelines. Provides a comprehensive knowledge base of the three major segments of each mode: management, marketing and operations, including the various types of freight and passenger services, both public and private, and the intermodal services. Historical, current and future trends of the North American surface transportation are covered, including the expanding intermodal needs and system approaches in both freight and passenger services, and the crucial connection with the origin of raw materials to destination manufacturing and ultimately to the consumer.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
TRSP 325Marine Transportation Management3.00
Addresses the management and future trends in marine transportation. The issues of vessel design, market share, finance, insurance, operations and sustainability are addressed for the ocean, inland and Great Lakes shipping segments. The development and application of national and international regulations that impact the marine transportation of freight and passengers will be analyzed. The topics of vessel financing, freight rates, vessel crewing, safety, environmental impacts, vessel operations, fleet management, port and flag state control, trade routes and intermodal operations will be explored using case study analysis.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
TRSP 400Transportation Internship2.00 - 7.00
Students extend classroom learning to a business setting in the transportation and logistics field. Students obtain the cooperation of an employer and prepare a learning contract. Students will submit weekly recaps of activities, a final report and presentation about their experience. This capstone course with a senior experience component is required for graduation from the Transportation and Logistics Management major and must be a minimum of six weeks long. The internship may be taken any academic term. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and consent of coopering instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
TRSP 401Advanced Supply Chain Management3.00
Examines advanced supply chain and logistics theory and concepts as applied in the modern business environment. Provides an understanding of the major functions of supply chain management. Exposes students to the tools and techniques employed in the analysis of logistics and supply chain systems. Emphasis on system optimization for the purpose of achieving customer satisfaction, and sustainability.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and TRSP 300.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
TRSP 402Urban Planning and Transportation Systems3.00
Comparative examinations of planning theories and practices that shaped the geography of 19th and 20th century urban and suburban areas. Introduction to the intraurban and interurban influences of transportation systems on land use and planning will be explored. Stresses the ways in which planners and planning ideologies have responded to different social, economic, political and technological (transportation and communication) innovations and pressures. The class includes an examination of 21st Century problems, pressures and solutions to urban and transportation needs. Qualifies as an Academic-Service Learning course (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). A significant semester-long group AS-L project, which connects the student with the Twin Ports community, is a substantial learning goal in the face-to-face section of this course. Cross-listed as GEOG/TRSP 402. S18, S20.
Prerequisites:
T&L majors who have completed GEOG 302 and admitted to SBE; or non-SBE majors who have completed GEOG 302, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
TRSP 405Port and Terminal Management3.00
Management principles applied to the operation of ports, terminals, warehouses, and distribution centers. Key topics to be addressed include: governance, administration, regulations, hazardous materials, materials handling, intermodal connections, environmental impacts and labor relations. Additional concepts such as location analysis, warehouse management systems, containerization, inventory management and sustainability will be addressed. Case study methodology will be used that applies quality management, Six Sigma and learn management principles.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
TRSP 430International and Intermodal Transportation Management3.00
Focuses on managing the export/import process of freight, the operation of international intermodal systems and conducting business in different cultures. Topics to be addressed include: entering foreign markets, multi-national logistics strategy, international law, currency exchange, insurance, INCOTERMS, commercial documents, customs clearance, packaging, transportation systems, multi-national business ethics, reverse logistics and sustainability.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only

School of Business and Economics Contact Information Top of Page

School of Business and Economics
University of Wisconsin - Superior
Erlanson Hall 301
Belknap and Catlin Ave.
P.O. Box 2000
Superior, WI 54880
Phone: 715-394-8206
Email: business@uwsuper.edu