2019-21 Graduate Catalog Course Descriptions

Graduate Course Descriptions

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ART - Art
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ART 698Practicum1.00 - 7.00
Supervised experience providing practical application in specific disciplines. Integration of the competencies of the individualized focus in contract form.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 702Art Therapy Seminar3.00
Investigation into topics of diagnosis and treatment in mental health. This course explores major categories of mental illness using the DSM, and the therapeutic methods that may be used for various disorders. Current research will be discussed.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art Therapy Graduate or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ART 704Issues in Visual Arts3.00
Advanced study of theoretical frameworks, concepts, contents, and contexts of visual arts. Topic will vary from the spirituality and the sacred in art, psychology and philosophy of art, primitivism in contemporary/modern art, cultural politics in art, feminism in art, science and technology in art, among others.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 705Graduate Drawing3.00
Advanced studies in drawing. Individual development emphasized.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 710Graduate Painting3.00
Advanced studies in painting.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 711Graduate Collage3.00
Advanced studies exploring the theory and practice of mixed media approaches to drawing and painting.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 713Ethical Considerations in Art Therapy3.00
This course provides an overview to the ethics and professional values that correspond to the practice of art therapy. Practical applications pertaining to matters of diversity, social justice and the use of technology will be addressed. This course also focuses on the awareness of one's own cultural history and the role that background plays in personal perceptions and world views. Through readings, examination of case studies, digital media and experiential approaches, students will gain an understanding of the legal and ethical issues involved in the practice of art therapy.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Art Therapy Graduate or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 719Multi-Modal Art Therapy3.00
An exploration of Multi-Modal healing techniques and their application in Art Therapy, Drama, Music, Poetry, and Play Therapy will be studied scholastically and experientially. Professionals in the field as well as varied techniques will be introduced.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art Therapy Graduate or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ART 720Studies in American Art3.00
American art of the Colonial, 19th or 20th Century period including sculpture, architecture and painting.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 721Mediterranean3.00
Architecture, sculpture, craft, and painting of the Mediterranean and Near East cultures to include any one or combination of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome or early Christian/Byzantine.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 723Medieval Art3.00
a) Early Christian and Byzantine; b) Medieval; c) Romanesque; d) Gothic: A detailed investigation of the art of the Middle Ages.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 724Visual Arts in Non-Western Societies3.00
Study of visual arts in non-western societies including North American Indian/Native American; Mesoamerican; Oceania/Pacific Islands, Asian, and African cultures.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 727Modern Art3.00
Nineteenth Century, 20th Century, Contemporary or Post-Modern Art and architecture and the forces which influenced the period. Research required.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 729Women in Art3.00
Women's expression in painting and sculpture, primarily of the 19th and 20th Centuries.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 730Readings In Art History3.00
Guided individual research on an approved topic.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 732African and African Diaspora Art History3.00
A survey of art created by people of African descent. Also discussed are some influences of Islam, Western Europe, and the Caribbean regions.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 735Research In Art Therapy3.00
An introduction to research methods used in art therapy with an emphasis on qualitative research design. Students will work on the formulation of research questions and develop a thesis proposal.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 740Graduate Printmaking3.00
Advanced studies in printmaking.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 741Graduate Photography 23.00
Advanced studies in photography. Emphasizes concept and process resolution by defining a specific direction through a cohesive body of photographs. Students have the option of working in film or digital.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 745Exploring Stigma: Verbal and Visual Narratives3.00
Social stigma exists. It may be associated with perceptions toward mental illness, socioeconomic status, race, gender identity, body image, and HIV/AIDS. Stories help humanize issues and are invaluable as educational and awareness-raising tools. Students will examine the existence of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination, and discover through art therapy-based approaches, how narratives play a role in social justice and in eliminating stigma.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art Therapy Graduate or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 750Psychology of Art3.00
Art as a fundamental human activity on an individual and societal level. Studies theories of creativity and issues of cultural and social diversity as applicable to art therapy.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art Therapy Graduate or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ART 760Graduate Sculpture3.00
Advanced studies in sculpture.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 770Graduate Ceramics3.00
Individualized studio problems in ceramics. Work at this level is expected to be specialized and without major technical problems.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 775Graduate Metalwork3.00
Advanced in nonferrous metalwork.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 779Graduate Fibers3.00
Topic: Loom Weaving - Individually designed series of experiences using the loom in interlocking fibers. Problems planned in consultation with instructor. Topic: Off-Loom Fibers - Advanced problems in primary structures should include research of primitive expression, materials and techniques.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 783Art Therapy Fundamentals3.00
Survey of the origins, history, and theoretical objectives and trends in art therapy. Ethical, legal issues and standards of good practice will be covered.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art Therapy Graduate or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 784Development of Creative Functioning3.00
The study of the creative individual; exploration of research related to creativity; techniques for promoting creative thinking and problem-solving in educational, clinical and business environments.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art Therapy Graduate or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 785Art Therapy Techniques3.00
Theoretical approaches and techniques used in art therapy will be studied. Students will also learn to develop and apply art therapy assessments.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art Therapy Graduate or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 789ART Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ART 795Independent Study1.00 - 5.00
Graduate art students work independently under guidance of an instructor. Students submit a proposal of study during the first week of the course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 797Art Field Study1.00 - 3.00
By special arrangement and permission of the department, a student may enroll for the off-campus study of a problem in art. Documentation required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 798Practicum1.00 - 7.00
Supervised experience providing practical application in specific disciplines. Integration of the competencies of the individualized focus in contract form.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 799Graduate Terminal Project in Art Therapy1.00 - 3.00
Students will complete a thesis project, which integrates their acquired theoretical knowledge, clinical internship experiences and applied critical thinking. This is a self-directed course for students who have been approved to pursue a Master’s Terminal Project. Course provides a structured format for completion of the Master’s Project under the advisement of an instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
ARTED - Art Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ARTED 781Art for Special Education3.00
Exploration of art concepts, media, and processes with adaptations for the mainstreamed student with special educational needs. A study of characteristics of students with behavior and/or learning disorders, cognitive delay, physical handicap, and gifted and talented.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ARTED 782Art Education for the Gifted and Talented3.00
Study of current guidelines, trends, and program options that address the special educational needs of gifted and talented students. Areas of emphasis include: student characteristics, artwork characteristics, identification procedures, and curriculum models.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
BIOL - Biology
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
BIOL 681Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in biology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Instructor permission to enroll in this course.
 
COAC - Coaching
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
COAC 689Coach Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
COMM - Communicating Arts
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
COMM 589Comm Arts Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
COMM 780Thesis3.00 - 6.00
Individual thesis research in Communication, Media, or Theatre. An outline of the proposed thesis must be approved by the advisor and the Communicating Arts Department Chair, and a contract completed before registration. Arranged.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed COMM 701 and COMM 702.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 789Comm Arts Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
COMM 798Independent Study3.00 - 6.00
Graduate-level independent investigation and/or production in Communication, Media or Theatre. Project designed in consultation with the instructor and a contract prior to enrollment. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
COUN - Guidance & Counselor Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
COUN 681Seminars in Counselor Education0.50 - 3.00
Selected topics and problems in counselor education. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or problem is studied each time.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
COUN 702Counseling Theories3.00
Analysis of counseling theories and practices. Examines several of the major theories -- historic and current -- of counseling. Serves as an introduction to the field of counseling and to illustrate the diversity of theoretical approaches which exist. Students develop a preliminary theoretical philosophy of counseling. One of three courses -- COUN 702, 704, 706 -- that serve as a foundation to the profession and the program.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COUN 704Introduction to Counseling3.00
Overview of the clinical mental health counseling profession and its areas of specialization, training, and concern. It examines program development and administration, relevant laws and applications, as well as one's professional identity as a counselor. The course covers areas such as prevention, consultation and advocacy. It is one of three courses (COUN 702, 704, 706) that serve as a foundation to the profession and program.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COUN 706Pre-practicum3.00
Counseling Processes introduces counseling skill development, emphasizing the skills essential in the interview and rapport building process. Students develop a thorough understanding of the counseling process as well as the role and function of the counselor. Students also develop self-awareness so the counselor-client relationship is therapeutic and so the counselor sets and maintains appropriate professional boundaries. Examines ethical and legal considerations inherent in the counseling process.
Prerequisites:
COUN 702, 704, and 712 are prerequisites for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COUN 708Organization and Administration of School Counseling and Other Pupil Services3.00
Overview of essential school counseling services and the role and function of the school counselor with emphasis on developing, and managing, and evaluating a comprehensive counseling program within the realms of an entire school. Covers the seven pupil services content standards and additional information pertaining to the other members of the pupil service team with whom the counselor works. Integrates special education, technology, legal and ethical issues.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COUN 712Family Counseling3.00
Introduction to family systems theory and family therapy techniques. Students develop an understanding of the current epistemological base of family system's theory, major contributors, and specifically review structural, strategic, behavioral and communications approaches to family counseling. Students review the organization and dynamics of their own families, coming to understand how their families impact their world perceptions and everyday behavior.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COUN 714Family Group Systems3.00
Integrates, at the next level of professional competence, family theory and family counseling techniques presented in preparatory courses. This course assumes that students in attendance are seeking skill development that will assist in meeting family counselor professional certification standards, (State and or National certifications). The course further assumes that students have explored their own family issues and will continue to do so through this course, as the course is in part experiential. Students will closely review the isomorphic processes reflected within their own familial systems that are reflected in their counseling approach and theory preferences. Students will assume the professional functions of a family counselor through current literature, development of professional vita and exploration of certification. At the successful conclusion of this course, students are assumed to be ready to provide supervised family counseling service.
Prerequisites:
COUN 712 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
COUN 716Couple and Marital Counseling3.00
While the concept of family seems to be defined and redefined through generational context the need of the individual to be “affiliated” continues to highlight the dyadic relationships importance to the emotional and social survival of the individual. This course then, is designed to explore intimate dyadic relationships and their importance to the concept of family, family development and society. Reviews select couple and family dynamics such as basic assumptions of human intimacy (variations), marriage (dissolution and remarriage), mate selection, communications, human sexuality, family crises, parenting, and aging. Through lectures, experiential exercise, reading, and class discussion family theory and technique will be instigated so as to provide conceptualizations toward therapeutic intervention.
Prerequisites:
COUN 712 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COUN 718Family Crisis Intervention3.00
This course offers: 1) A history of the development and progression of crisis counseling as a specialization in the mental health field, 2) A survey of current crisis counseling models and how they can be applied in a wide range of contexts, 3) Examining the foundation of components of trauma on the stress response system and display, 4) Familiarity with suicide risk assessment, intervention and mandatory reporting, 5) An examination of the intrapersonal and interpersonal impact crises have on people, 6) A discussion on the legal and ethical issues pertaining to crisis and disaster counseling and, 7) An in-depth Family Systems-oriented treatment and application of these principles and standards specifically to families in crisis and how counselors can understand and address the unique dynamics that arise when a family unit faces loss and trauma.
Prerequisites:
COUN 712 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COUN 720Counseling Children3.00
Focuses on how the counselor can facilitate self-expression in the counseling context with clients, primarily children, who may have difficulty expressing themselves verbally. Developmental theories and issues that shape children's adjustment to school and to their community form the foundations of the course. Basic solution-oriented brief counseling and consultative techniques are integrated for work with parents and teachers.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
COUN 722Counseling Adolescents3.00
Adolescents represent a clientele in transition. This course examines key aspects in their development (biological, cognitive, emotional, and social) and their relationships in the various contexts that influence behaviors and attitudes. Common issues of adolescence as well as various interventions are covered from a developmental context. Students learn how to facilitate client self-expression primarily through brief therapeutic techniques and how to consult with supervising adults. While the focus is on normal development, course also touches on at-risk/problematic behavior and thoughts.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COUN 724Behavior Modification for Abnormal Behavior3.00
Behavior management principles applied to mental disorders and to improve learning and behavioral outcomes. Students learn how to apply these principles and techniques to aid individuals in the change process. Students plan, implement, and evaluate a self-change project which will demonstrate their understanding of the theory and techniques of behavioral self management. Students will conduct a functional behavior analysis to develop interventions and/or apply a clinical treatment plan to address client psychopathology.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
COUN 726Developmental Guidance and Counseling3.00
Developing the knowledge, skills, and expertise necessary to teach developmental lessons in the classroom that are appropriate to all ages. Covers classroom management. Students, using the ASCA and Wisconsin Developmental Models, develop a set of lessons (perhaps based on monthly themes) specific to the ages of the children they intend to counsel. Emerging problems in the schools, such as bullying, sexual harassment, and abuse are covered. Class covers the 10 WDPI Teacher and Pupil Services Standards.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
COUN 728Career Counseling3.00
Provides an understanding of theories of vocational choice and vocational development. Students learn methods of evaluating, promoting, and enhancing, vocational development in individuals from a diversity of backgrounds. They examine ethical and legal considerations inherent in the career counseling process. Also emphasizes student application of traditional and technology-based career assessment techniques. Students participate in experiential activities that focus on the career development of themselves and others.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
COUN 730Human Growth and Development3.00
Surveys the key physical, cognitive, and social-emotional milestones across the life-span, how these interact with an individual's adaptation ability, and the implications for mental health professionals. Focuses on 1) the key concepts of the major theories of development; 2) examination of normal developmental stages across the life-span and the influence of social forces differences in development based on sex/gender, age, class, race, ability, and cultural background; psychosocial adaptation in the school/work, family, and peer systems; and implications for mental health and school counseling professionals. Includes legal and ethical issues and strategies for interventions to enhance development.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
COUN 734Chemical Dependency and the Family3.00
Assessment and intervention techniques with individuals and families in which one or more other family members is chemically dependent. Provides an overview of the process of addiction, treatment and recovery approaches, relapse prevention, developmental issues related to addiction and treatment and prevention planning in regard to addiction. Specific techniques to intervene with spouses of alcoholics, children of alcoholics (minor children and/or adults) and extended family members are included. Also reviews the impact of other addictive behaviors on the family.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COUN 738Multicultural Counseling3.00
Students conduct an in-depth self-analysis regarding the manner in which counselor and client values, perceptions, attitudes, acculturative experiences, and communication styles impact the counseling process. Students are encouraged to conduct an in-depth cultural self-analysis regarding the issues they have inherited from their own culture as it relates to helping multicultural clients. Furthermore, students learn theories, skills, and cross-cultural counseling strategies necessary in working with ethnically and culturally diverse clients. The cross-cultural counseling strategies include both group and individual techniques. Students examine any ethical and legal considerations inherent in the counseling process in regards to clients from a diversity of backgrounds. Designed for counselors already working in the field, and current graduate counseling students. Also helpful for any professional who regularly deals with multicultural individuals.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COUN 740Counseling and Human Sexuality3.00
Provides counselors with a contemporary understanding of human sexuality and gender issues, myths, and problems (physical/biological, emotional, social, cultural) for people (married and not) considering, engaging in, and/or "recovering" from sexual relationships. Includes interventions and treatment approaches. While the course is a requirement for Marriage and the Family Therapist Licensure, it is open to all interested counseling students.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COUN 742Psychopathology3.00
Study of abnormal behavior, including classification of various disorders, descriptions of causal factors, methods of assessment, prevention and treatment. Includes examining the current diagnostic system, DSM-5. Students develop an awareness of the limitations of the current diagnostic system along with multicultural and ethical considerations. Also teaches students how to integrate results from psychological assessment into the diagnostic process.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COUN 744Clinical Mental Health Diagnosis and Treatment Planning3.00
Provides students with an in-depth knowledge base of clinical mental health counseling diagnosis and treatment planning. Cover the diagnostic process, including differential diagnosis and the use of diagnostic classification systems such as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-V (DSM-5). Training on administration of intake interview, mental status evaluation, biopsychosocial history, mental health history, and psychological assessment for treatment planning and caseload management; and techniques and interventions related to a broad range of mental health issues. Students will develop clinical writing skill for competence with clients. Treatment planning will focus primarily on cognitive behavioral theory and applied intervention strategies based in outcome research.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COUN 746Ethics in Professional Counseling3.00
Serves the needs of Counselors within the area of practice generally referred to as ethics, through the guidance of the American Counseling Association (ACA) 2014 Code of Ethics. Assists students in exploring personal values, social expectations/sanctions and professional standards of behavior as it relates to the mental health counseling field. Course seeks to meet the specific state licensure certification and practice needs of the student enrolled.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COUN 750Practicum3.00
Assists students in making the transition from theoretical understanding of counseling principles and processes to therapeutic process. Students demonstrate knowledge and skills and refine their knowledge and skills in the following areas: integration of his or her theoretical approach to counseling competence in the basic counseling skills with a focus on individual and group counseling as learned in prior coursework; the ability to identify and assess presenting concerns of clients, diagnose problems, and develop treatment plans; and an ability to present case studies, dialogue, and consult with other professionals regarding his or her effectiveness as a counselor.
Prerequisites:
COUN 706 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COUN 752Group Practicum3.00
Introduction to group counseling including an understanding of group processes, techniques, role of group members and leaders, ethics, and culture, selected group phenomena, processing of group dynamics and therapeutic movement, application of theory and theoretical techniques. The student is required to form and lead a group using a theoretical orientation, and to process the experience through tapes and class discussions.
Prerequisites:
COUN 706 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Summer Terms
COUN 756Internship-School (preK-12)3.00 - 6.00
Field-based course providing on-the-job practice in counseling with individuals and groups and in the classroom under the guidance of an on-site supervisor and a university faculty supervisor. Weekly group discussions of cases and sharing of work experiences is at the heart of the campus classes. Particular content areas that enhance professional preparation (such as legal and ethical issues, standards, technology) are covered. Students are expected to share their counseling work weekly for supervision and peer review. Counseling Portfolios are completed and readied for submission. Student planning to complete in one semester should sign up for 6 credits. Students planning to complete in two semester should sign up for 3 credits each semester. Instructor consent required.
Prerequisites:
Completion of COUN 750 and COUN 752 are prerequisite for taking this course in the clinical and MFT Track but not the Human Relations Track.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COUN 758Internship-Clinical/MFT/Human Relations3.00 - 6.00
Experiential course that integrates counseling theory into practical application under supervision. Off-campus professional work sites provide students practical experience while weekly class sessions provide support/supervision for work-site activities. Students' skill integration will be monitored and modified through class discussion, written assignments, class exercises and one-to-one supervision with instructor. This advanced course seeks to finalize professional readiness. Successful completion is dependent on the assumption of the professional functions and obligations of a human service provider. Each internship is an individual placement that is developed related to the professional needs of the student, the needs of the internship site and the coordination by the internship instructor. Student planning to complete in one semester should sign up for 6 credits. Students planning to complete in two semesters should sign up for 3 credits each semester. Instructor consent required.
Prerequisites:
Completion of COUN 750 and COUN 752 are prerequisite for taking this course in the clinical and MFT Track but not the Human Relations Track.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COUN 760Introduction to Assessment3.00
Addresses the study of measurement theory and basic statistics needed for understanding assessment. Also focuses on general test construction, appropriate instrument selection with awareness of limitations, multicultural and ethical considerations. Instruments covered focus on psychological and intellectual functioning and can generally be administered to clients individually or in groups. Students experience the administration, interpretation and reporting of a select sample of assessment tools. Students will be introduced to professional report writing and consequential treatment implications.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COUN 761Research-Based Program Evaluation3.00
Students develop their understanding of types of program evaluation, consultation and application procedures. This includes, but is not limited to, qualitative and quantitative research, ethical/legal consideration, parametric and nonparametric research methods, principles, practices, applications of needs assessment. Students will consult, conduct and write a literature review, develop a method for data collection, analysis, conclusions and make recommendations. Student research topics will be in their specific discipline; school counseling, clinical counseling, marital and family therapy or human relations.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
 
CSCI - Computer Science
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
CSCI 681Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
Graduate level investigation of one or more topics of current interest. Not intended for independent study projects. May be repeated, but no more than a total of eight credits may be earned from both MATH 681 and CSCI 681.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
CYB - Cybersecurity
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
CYB 700Cybersecurity Fundamentals3.00
ntroduces fundamental concepts and design principles in cybersecurity. Students will understand what, why, and how to protect in the cyberworld. Topics include CIA (Confidentiality, Integrity, and Availability), threats, attacks, defense, least privilege, access control and password management, security policies, critical controls, incident-handling and contingency planning, risk assessment and management.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 703Network Security3.00
xamines network architectures, threats and attack surfaces exploited by these threats. Students will look at network traffic inspection, common attacks and defensive techniques like encryption, network segmentation, firewalls, application proxies, honeypots, DMZs, monitoring networks using: intrusion detection and intrusion prevention systems, and network access control.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 705Cybersecurity and Society3.00
Presents the principles of applied sociology that account for the human factors in security systems. Topics include an examination of the human role in cybersecurity, the role of security in the context of an organization, and a special focus on the development and implementation of cybersecurity policies.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 707Cybersecurity Planning3.00
Instruction on the process used to develop and maintain appropriate security levels for an organization with a focus on implementing a comprehensive security program, a documented set of security policies, procedures, guidelines, and standards. Topics include security planning, strategies, controls, and metrics for measuring the effectiveness.
Prerequisites:
CYB 700 prerequisite
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 710Introductory Cryptography3.00
Fundamentals of applied cryptography, including encryption and decryption, symmetric and asymmetric systems, pseudorandom functions, block ciphers, hash functions, common attacks, digital signatures, key exchange, message authentication and public key cryptography. Implemen-tation of cryptographic systems in an approved programming language. Survey of relevant math-ematical concepts, including elementary number theory.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 715Managing Security Risk3.00
Covers risk management processes and tools, risk assessment and analysis models, economic and control implications, risk measurement, and the ethics of risk. Students will communicate the technical and management-aspects of risk, based on research of their chosen industry, related regulation, recent industry reports, and risk implications to organizations, individuals and the nation.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 720Communication in Cybersecurity3.00
Research, organize, and present technical information to audiences with varying goals and technical needs. Emphasis on ethics, critical thinking, listening skills, and feedback to develop effective messages utilizing verbal and nonverbal communication strategies and visual aids. Individual and group presentations and projects will emulate professional scenarios in cybersecurity.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 725Computer Forensics3.00
This course provides instruction on the investigative and forensics processes of digital evidence with a focus on identifying indicators of compromise, the use of common forensics tools, and the preservation of forensics tools. Topics include forensics iconology, and the analysis of disk, memory, chip-off, mobile device, and OS artifacts.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of CYB 700, 703
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 730Computer Criminology3.00
A primer on modern criminology with specific attention to the aspects of technology that facilitate criminal behaviors. Topics include computer crime laws, criminological theories of computer crime, court room and evidentiary procedure, idiographic and nomothetic digital profiling, computer crime victimology, habit/authorship attribution, stylometry, and case linkage analysis.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 735Network Forensics3.00
Covers protocol analysis, identification of malicious behavior in systems, and forensic investigations through event log aggregation, correlation and analysis. Students will analyze clips of network protocol analysis to discern methods of attacks and malicious activities. Reviews wired and wireless protocols and cover their associated attacks, with case studies involving protocol analysis, log analysis, and other tools.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of CYB 703
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 740Incident Response and Remediation3.00
Addresses how to set up an incident response system in an organization and the phases of an IR: Preparation, Identification, Notification, Containment, and Eradication of the threat actors, and Recovery and Reporting to prevent future incidents. Students will learn about the use of IDS and forensics, dealing with false alarms and the remediation process to minimize business impact, plan business continuity, and work with law enforcement, auditors, insurance, and compliance.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of CYB 700, 703, 705, 707, 715, 720
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 745Secure Operating Systems3.00
Covers operating systems security infrastructure. Topics include, for a given operating system (Windows/Linux), updates and patches, access controls and account management, configuration management, hardening and securing services, and the use of scripting languages to automate security management. Additional topics may include auditing and forensics, virtualization and cloud computing.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 750Offensive Security3.00
This course includes active defenses such as penetration testing, log management, hacking, threat management and system posturing. Students completing this course will have an understanding of, and the ability to preemptively secure computer and network resources by utilizing information about threats, actors and attack vectors and the ethics behind using this data.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of CYB 700, 703
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 755Security Administration3.00
Covers the policy and governance aspects of security. Topics include application of security policies, standards, procedures and guidelines to administration of IT and communications, assessment of compliance including contractual, legal, industry standard, privacy and regulatory requirements, and implementation of security audits and assessment of security performance and security policy efficacy.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of CYB 700, 703, 705, 707, 715, 720
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 760Leadership & Teams3.00
Focuses on leadership best practices and the interpersonal processes and structural characteristics that influence the effectiveness of teams. Emphasis will be placed on leadership models, principles of team building, group dynamics, problem solving, and crisis management in cybersecurity issues. Course will include case studies of modern security incidents.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 765Cybersecurity Management3.00
Covers management of cybersecurity policies and strategies at the organizational, national, and transnational levels. Examines the implications of key domestic and international regulations and changes in information technology and communications on security operations. Includes development of organizational security preparation, processes, and responses, and developing a disaster recovery program.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of CYB 700, 703, 705, 707, 715, 720
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 770Security Architecture3.00
Focuses on security architectures for the protection of information systems and data. Students completing this course can identify potential vulnerabilities in system architectures and design secure architectures. Topics include common enterprise and security architectures and their key design elements, such as secure cloud computing and virtualization infrastructures.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of CYB 703
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 775Applied Cryptography3.00
An in-depth study of modern cryptography. Topics include public key and private key cryptography, types of attacks, cryptanalysis, perfect secrecy, hashing, digital signatures, virtual private networks, and quantum key cryptography. Topics from number theory and discrete probability necessary for understanding current cryptosystems and their security will be covered.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of CYB 710
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 780Software Security3.00
Covers the foundations of engineering secure applications, including techniques used to engineer secure software and assess the security of applications. Topics include exploiting web vulnerabilities, secure development processes, implementing security features such as secure data storage and transmission, threat modeling, security requirements, code analysis, and penetration testing.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 785Cyber-Physical Sys. Security3.00
Covers the fundamentals and techniques to design and implement cyber-physical systems. Topics include the architecture of cyber-physical systems, exploiting software vulnerabilities, secure coding, microservices security, cloud services security, reverse engineering, security assessment of cyber-physical systems, and data analytics for security.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of CYB 775
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 789Cybersecurity Pre-capstone3.00
Prepares student for capstone experience. Draws on skills learned, students will submit a written project proposal - with organization, timeline, learning objectives, and specific deliverables identified – for faculty approval. This course is a pre-requisite for the capstone course.
Prerequisites:
Completion of CORE courses CYB 700, 703, 705, 707, 710, 715, 720, 725, 730, 740, 745, 750, 755, 760, 765, 770, 775, 780, 785
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
CYB 790Cybersecurity Capstone3.00
Students present project identified in Capstone Preparation and submit a written report plus oral presentation to both faculty and host organization. Students will be assessed on clarity and content of written report and presentation.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of CYB 789
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
DS - Data Science
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
DS 700Foundations of Data Science3.00
This course provides an introduction to data science and highlights its importance in business decision making. It provides an overview of commonly used data science tools along with spreadsheets, databases, statistics and programming assignments to lay the foundation for data science applications.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in Data Science program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
DS 705Statistical Methods3.00
Statistical methods and inference procedures will be presented in this course with an emphasis on applications, computer implementation, and interpretation of results. Topics include simple and multiple regression, model selection, correlation, moderation/interaction analysis, logistic regression, chi-square test, ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test, MANOVA, factor analysis, and canonical correlation analysis.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in Data Science program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
DS 710Programming for Data Science3.00
Introduction to programming languages and packages used in Data Science.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in Data Science program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
DS 715Data Warehousing3.00
Introduce the concepts and techniques to work with and reason about subject-oriented, integrated, time-variant, and nonvolatile collections of data in support of management's decision-making process.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in Data Science program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
DS 730Big Data: High Performance Computing3.00
This course will teach students how to process large datasets efficiently. Students will be introduced to non-relational databases. Students will learn algorithms that allow for the distributed processing of large data sets across clusters.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of DS 710 and declared Data Science Major
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
DS 735Communicating about Data3.00
This course will prepare you to master technical, informational and persuasive communication to meet organizational goals. Technical communication topics include a study of the nature, structure and interpretation of data. Informational communication topics include data visualization and design of data for understanding and action. Persuasive communication topics include the study of written, verbal and nonverbal approaches to influencing decision makers.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in Data Science program
DS 740Data Mining & Machine Learning3.00
This course covers two aspects of data analytics. First, it teaches techniques to generate visualizations appropriate to the audience type, task, and data. Second, it teaches methods and techniques for analyzing unstructured data - including text mining, web text mining and social network analysis.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of DS 705 and DS 710 and Declared DS Major
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
DS 745Visualization and Unstructured Data Analysis3.00
This course covers two aspects of data analytics. First, it teaches techniques to generate visualizations appropriate to the audience type, task, and data. Second, it teaches methods and techniques for analyzing unstructured data - including text mining, web text mining and social network analysis.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of DS 700, DS 705, DS 710, & DS 740
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
DS 760Ethics of Data Science3.00
This course will focus on the investigation of ethical issues in computer science that ultimately also pertain to data science, including privacy, plagiarism, intellectual property rights, piracy, security, confidentiality and many other issues. Our study of these issues will begin broadly, with a look at ethical issues in computer science at large. We will then make inferences to the narrower field of data science. We will consider ethical arguments and positions, the quality and integrity of decisions and inferences based on data and how important cases and laws have shaped the legality, if not the morality, of data science related computing. Case studies will be used to investigate issues.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of DS 700 or DS 780
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
DS 775Prescriptive Analytics3.00
This course covers procedures and techniques for using data to inform the decision-making process. Topics include optimization, decision analysis, game theory, and simulation. Case studies and applications will be emphasized.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of DS 705 & Admission to Data Science Program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
DS 780Data Science and Strategic Decision Making3.00
The interaction between data science and strategic decision making. Leveraging data resources for competitive advantage in the marketplace.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in Data Science program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
DS 785Data Science Capstone3.00
Capstone course; students will develop and execute a data science project using real-world data and communicate results to a non-technical audience.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Data Science 700, 705, 710, 715, 730, 735, 740, 745 & 775
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
ECED - Early Childhood Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ECED 681Seminars in Early Childhood0.50 - 4.00
Selected topics and problems in the area of early childhood. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or problem is studied each time. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
EDAD - Educational Administration
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
EDAD 689EDAD Elective1.00 - 3.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
EDAD 700Administrative Leadership3.00
Study of selected theories and research relating to individual and group behaviors in K-12 educational organizations with emphasis on leadership characteristics of educational administrators, including participatory management, long-range strategic planning and change-agent processes. Particular emphasis given to human relations skills as well as oral and written communication skills needed by public school leaders.
EDAD 701The Director of Instruction3.00
A study of the various factors which will provide the student with foundations of research, theory, and best practices in instructional leadership and school.
EDAD 704Practicum - Director of Instruction1.50
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience (i.e. 200 Special Education and 120 Pupil Services) and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a grades PK-12 Director of Special Education and Pupil Services setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits. (Pass/Fail)
EDAD 705Practicum - Director of Instruction1.50
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience (i.e. 200 Special Education and 120 Pupil Services) and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a grades PK-12 Director of Special Education and Pupil Services setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits. (Pass/Fail)
EDAD 706Practicum - Director of Instruction1.50
1.50Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience (i.e. 200 Special Education and 120 Pupil Services) and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a grades PK-12 Director of Special Education and Pupil Services setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits. (Pass/Fail)
EDAD 707Practicum - Director of Instruction1.50
1.50Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience (i.e. 200 Special Education and 120 Pupil Services) and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a grades PK-12 Director of Special Education and Pupil Services setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits. (Pass/Fail)
EDAD 709Directed Study-Administrative Vision of Learning1.00 - 3.00
Directed study by the graduate faculty member to the graduate student in the Administrative Vision of Learning contexts of Educational Administration.
EDAD 710Supervision of Instruction3.00
Study of the function of supervision and evaluation of personnel is designed to assist in the development of programs which will be appropriate to respective school positions and settings. Prepares any member of an organization for the instructional leadership role which requires program planning, evaluation, human relations, and oral and written communication skills.
EDAD 711Curriculum Management and Development K-123.00
Study of the theories and related practices of curriculum development and curriculum organization in American schools. Focuses on methods, materials and strategies in the development, organization and delivery of curriculum in the American K-12 school system. Special emphasis given to development and interpretation of philosophical statements and management. Attention given to utilization of the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction curriculum guides.
EDAD 719Directed Study-Administration of Student Learning and Staff Growth1.00 - 3.00
Directed study by the graduate faculty member to the graduate student in the Administration of Student Learning and Staff Growth contexts of Educational Administration.
EDAD 720School Business Administration3.00
Study of fiscal and material resource management and budgeting of K-12 school systems, including school finance, taxation and contract law with emphasis on the principles that should serve to guide the decision-making process.
EDAD 721The Principalship3.00
Study of the roles and responsibility of the school principal, with emphasis on development of effective instructional leadership skills for the various levels. Deals with the operational tasks of the principalship at the elementary, middle school, and high school levels. Response to contemporary and anticipated problems affecting the elementary and secondary schools are based on tested theory, research and applied practice.
EDAD 724Practicum - PreK-12 Principal1.50
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a grades PK-12 Principalship setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits. (Pass/Fail)
EDAD 725Practicum - PreK-12 Principal1.50
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a grades PK-12 Principalship setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits. (Pass/Fail)
EDAD 726Practicum - PreK-12 Principal1.50
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a grades PK-12 Principalship setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits. (Pass/Fail)
EDAD 727Practicum - PreK-12 Principal1.50
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a grades PK-12 Principalship setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits. (Pass/Fail)
EDAD 728Diversity and Social Justice in Schools3.00
Examination of issues related to inequities and inequalities in PK-12 schools. Explores diversity in education from a historical perspective to inform institutional practices regarding race, class, gender, sexual orientation and religion. Considers power dynamics, pedagogy, and ideologies that frame education in a democratic society. Explores the administrator's role and best practices in facilitating equity for all students.
EDAD 729Directed Study - Administration of Organization, Operations and Resources1.00 - 3.00
Directed study by the graduate faculty member to the graduate student in the Administration of Organization, Operations and Resources contexts of Educational Administration.
EDAD 730Administration and Supervision Of Special Education and Pupil Services3.00
Study of leadership and administrative paradigms of special education and pupil services PK-12. Emphasis on exceptional educational needs programming knowledge base for inclusive administrative leadership. Emphasis on special needs programming knowledge base not the prominent responsibility of regular or special education.
EDAD 734Practicum- Director of Special Education1.50
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a grades PK-12 Director of Instruction setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits. (Pass/Fail)
EDAD 735Practicum- Director of Special Education1.50
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a grades PK-12 Director of Instruction setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits. (Pass/Fail)
EDAD 736Practicum- Director of Special Education1.50
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a grades PK-12 Director of Instruction setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits. (Pass/Fail)
EDAD 737Practicum- Director of Special Education1.50
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a grades PK-12 Director of Instruction setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits. (Pass/Fail)
EDAD 739Directed Study - Administration of Diverse Community Interests1.00 - 3.00
Directed study by the graduate faculty member to the graduate student in the Administration of Diverse Community Interests contexts of Educational Administration.
EDAD 741Conflict Resolution and Mediation in K-12 Educational Settings3.00
Study in the understanding of conflict and handling such in the educational setting. Recognition of the role of communication to express conflict and knowledge of resolution techniques, different approaches to negotiations and basic mediation skills for administrators in the K-12 setting. Also explores the phenomena of school violence and means to respond.
EDAD 749Directed Study-Ethical Manner in Educational Administration1.00 - 3.00
Directed study by the graduate faculty member to the graduate student in the ethical manner contexts of Educational Administration.
EDAD 750School Law3.00
Study of the legal framework within which school district employees must operate. Emphasis on laws and sources of laws which affect students and instruction.
EDAD 759Directed Study-Political, Social, and Economic Contexts of Educational Administration1.00 - 3.00
Directed study by the graduate faculty member to the graduate student in the political, social, and economic contexts of educational administration.
EDAD 761Practicum - School Business Administration1.50
Year-long minimum 320-hour administrative field experience and seminar (four 1.5 credit modules for a total of 6 credits) in a School Business Administration setting. Prerequisite: Completion of nine EDAD credits.
EDAD 809Externship-Administrative Vision of Learning1.00 - 3.00
Professional development seminar designed for the practicing school administrator. Emphasis on synthesizing the theory, research and wisdoms of practice of educational administration as related to challenges of practicing school administration to ISLLC Standard #1. Pass-Fail. Enrollment limited to practicing educational administrators. Topics: Administrative Vision of Learning ISLLC #1, Wisconsin State Standard 2.
EDAD 810School Human Resources3.00
Comprehensive study of K-12 instructional and non-instructional personnel planning, information management, recruitment, selection, induction, appraisal, staff development, compensation, continuity of service, collective bargaining, grievance procedures and employee contract administration.
EDAD 819Externship-Administration of Student Learning and Staff Growth1.00 - 3.00
Professional development seminar designed for the practicing school administrator. Emphasis on synthesizing the theory, research and wisdoms of practice of educational administration as related to challenges of practicing school administration to ISLLC Standard #2. Pass-Fail. Enrollment limited to emerging and practicing educational administrators. Topics: Administration of Student Learning and Staff Growth, ISLLC #2, Wisconsin State Standard 3.
EDAD 820The Superintendency3.00
Study of the role and responsibilities of the school superintendent with emphasis on the job competency needed for that leadership role. Topics focus on school improvement through organizational and instructional leadership, assessment and long-range planning, political theory and skills, crisis management, and careful allocation of district resources.
EDAD 821Data Management3.00
Designed for school business personnel pursuing a graduate degree in school business administration. Subject matter will include building files, updating file content, information retrieval and analyses of data associated with school operations.
EDAD 823Education Budget and Accounting3.00
Designed for school business personnel pursuing a graduate degree in school business administration. Focuses on design and application of budgeting and accounting procedures such as coding transactions, designing balance sheets, journals and ledgers using spreadsheet programs.
EDAD 824Educational Program Planning and Evaluation3.00
Advanced-level study of theory and research/practice in association with the organization and operation of public schools. Emphasis on self-analysis of supervisory-administrative style as it relates to the process of supervision involved in performance tasks. Additional focus on program planning and evaluation as related to theory and research/practice in public schools.
EDAD 825Facilities Planning and Utilization3.00
Study of the principles, techniques, and procedures used in planning of educational facilities in K-12 systems. Emphasis on the assessment of needs, involvement in the planning process, development of educational specifications, long-range planning and financing. Risk management and insurance issues are covered within the knowledge base.
EDAD 829Externship-Administration of Organization, Operations and Resources1.00 - 3.00
Professional development seminar designed for the practicing school administrator. Emphasis on synthesizing the theory, research and wisdoms of practice of educational administration as related to challenges of practicing school administration to ISLLC Standard #3. Pass-Fail. Enrollment limited to practicing educational administrators. Topics: ISLLC Standard #3.
EDAD 830Diverse School Community Relations3.00
Study of the administrative responsibility for successful diverse community relations with emphasis on the process, principles, channels, opinion sampling and evolving concepts of communication. A program will be developed including policy, objectives, defining publics, determining media, timing and feedback.
EDAD 832Special Education Law3.00
Study of the legal aspects of educating disabled learners under Section 504, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and No Child Left Behind.
EDAD 839Externship-Administration of Diverse Community Interests1.00 - 3.00
Professional development seminar designed for the practicing school administrator. Emphasis on synthesizing the theory, research and wisdoms of practice of educational administration as related to challenges of practicing school administration to ISLLC Standard #4. Pass-Fail. Enrollment limited to practicing educational administrators. Topics: ISLLC Standard #4.
EDAD 842Professional Ethics for School Administrators3.00
Selected theories and research relating to individual and group behaviors in K-12 educational organizations with emphasis on ethics in public life among professionals, leaders and citizens. Particular emphasis given to political, cultural, business, computer and legal ethics for school leaders.
EDAD 849Externship-Ethical Manner in Educational Administration1.00 - 3.00
Professional development seminar designed for the practicing school administrator. Emphasis on synthesizing the theory, research and wisdoms of practice of educational administration as related to challenges of practicing school administration to ISLLC Standard #5. Pass-Fail. Enrollment limited to practicing educational administrators.
EDAD 850School Finance and Resource Allocation3.00
Study of the theory and practice of school finance at the local, state, and national levels. Emphasis on the economics of education, public finance, and taxation.
EDAD 851Politics Of Education3.00
Examines the governance structure of education. Focuses on the roles of various political factors and special interest groups in the structure and the emergence of new political roles and initiatives in educational administration.
EDAD 854Advanced Budgeting3.00
Theory and practice of advanced budgeting at the local school district level. Emphasis on the meritorious techniques and standards of excellence in budget development and presentation.
EDAD 859Externship-Political, Social and Economic Contexts of Educational Administration1.00 - 3.00
Professional development seminar designed for the practicing school administrator. Emphasis on synthesizing the theory, research and wisdoms of practice of educational administration as related to challenges of practicing school administration to ISLLC Standard #6. Pass-Fail. Enrollment limited to practicing educational administrators.
EDAD 863Internship: Superintendency1.50
A minimum 90-hour administrative internship in a PK-12 superintendency. Prerequisite: Admission to Special Degree Program, completion of nine semester credits in Educational Administration. This course is graded as Pass/Fail.
EDAD 864Internship: Superintendency1.50
A minimum 90 hour administrative internship in a PK-12 superintendency. Prerequisites: Admission to Specialist Degree Program, completion of nine semester credits in Educational Administration. This course is graded a Pass/Fail
EDAD 865Statistical Methods Research3.00
Study of statistical design and methodology used in educational research with emphasis given to understandings of appropriate application of statistical tests to educational data. The student studies application of skills developed in basic statistics. Emphasis on the understanding, planning, and execution of statistical studies, descriptive and inferential in approach. Study is conducted with a computer-oriented approach.
EDAD 866Advanced Administrative Analysis3.00
Scholarly work requirement provides the post-graduate student an opportunity to conduct action research in an educational administration related project. The action research and scholarly paper development is completed under the direction of the student's advisor. Guidelines for action research and the subsequent paper are available from the advisor.
 
ENGED - English Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ENGED 606Advanced Children's Literature3.00
Advanced study of the various types of fiction and nonfiction literatures published for, used with, or selected by children birth to age 12. Emphasis is on using children's literature across the content areas with best practice instruction. Includes the selection, evaluation, appreciation, and use of children's literature and related media. Explores methods to help develop a child's interest in reading and ability to appreciate quality children's literature.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ENGED 618Middle Level Literature3.00
Study of classic and current readings in middle level literature in conjunction with a discussion of the English language arts and literacy skills and concepts typically addressed in grades 5-8. Engaging instructional strategies and assessment tasks will also be emphasized.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
ENGED 663Advanced Study of Literacy Pre K-33.00
Study of the design and implementation of developmentally appropriate curricula and instruction in the language arts that foster the concept of emergent literacy. Focuses on the development of language (both oral and written) and literacy from birth through third grade.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGED 664Advanced Literacy Grades 4-123.00
Study of the design and implementation of language arts curricula and instruction in grades 4-12. Focuses on creating strategic lifelong readers and writers.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGED 665Advanced Content Area Literacy3.00
Study of the use of literacy processes in developing student learning in the content areas. Emphasis is on the integration of learning theory and subject matter knowledge in planning instruction which makes profitable use of test and writing to meet curriculum goals.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
ENGED 681Seminars in Education1.00 - 3.00
Selected topics and problems in the area of teacher education. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or problem is studied each time.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
ENGED 701Introduction to Reading Difficulties3.00
Investigation of various aspects of reading difficulties so that special reading teachers and classroom teachers can provide effective reading instruction to readers of a variety of abilities. Strategies for diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties at the elementary and secondary levels will be considered. It is strongly recommended that students in this course enroll in ENGED 702 during the following semester.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGED 702Reading Difficulties Practicum3.00
Practicum in which theories and instructional strategies learned in ENGED 701 are put into practice as the student plans and conducts a program of diagnosis and instruction for elementary-level and secondary-level readers of a variety of abilities. Clinical experiences are designed to develop the student's skill as a diagnostician and teacher of readers of varying abilities.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ENGED 701.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
ENGED 705The K-12 Literacy Program3.00
In-depth study of K-12 literacy programs. Emphasis is on characteristics of effective school literacy programs and methods of planning, developing, and evaluating effective programs.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ENGED 709History of Reading3.00
Exploration of philosophical orientations to literacy instruction with a study of the research base. Students will investigate the history of literacy instruction as well as the most important research studies to affect instruction.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGED 751MSE-Reading Portfolio0.00
Capstone experience of the student's program demonstrating professional growth through reflections on best-practice skills and knowledge gained throughout the coursework. Satisfactory completion of the portfolio as ascertained by the student's program advisor fulfills the state of Wisconsin portfolio requirement for licensure.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ENGED 752Educational Research Project3.00
A literacy research project designed and carried out by a student with the advice and approval of the research advisor. Research advisor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ENGED 781Independent Study2.00 - 4.00
Specially designed study to allow the graduate student to pursue specific areas of need or interest. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
ENGL - English
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ENGL 665Modern American Poetry3.00
The study of major writers and poetic movements in modern American poetry.
 
FNS - First Nation Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FNS 681Counseling the First Nations3.00
Explores counseling theory and application techniques from a First Nations perspective. First Nations world view and linear vs. holistic thinking are principle topics. Group and individual counseling is addressed and practiced. Designed for people in helping professions that deal with First Nations clients. Cross-listed as COUN 481/681.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 686Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in First Nations Studies selected by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when instructor and/or topics are different. Instructor's approval required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
GEOG - Geography
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
GEOG 681Special Topics1.00 - 6.00
In-depth study of specialized topics in geography selected by the faculty on the basis of student interest/need. May include workshops, seminars, special issues, etc. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Offered on demand.
 
GEOL - Geology
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
GEOL 681Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in Geology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. May be repeated when topics are different. Offered on demand. Instructor consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
HHP - Health and Human Performance
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HHP 521Adapted Human Performance (PE)2.00
Activity selection, curricular development and program implementation in teaching exceptional/special needs students. Includes hands-on intervention with exceptional/special needs students.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 540Organization and Administration of Human Performance, Health & Athletics3.00
Techniques, procedures, and principles of organizing and administering human performance, allied health and athletic programs. Emphasizes administrative structure, legal liability, and facilities management.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 541Principles and Theory of Coaching2.00
Analysis of the role of the coach, including the latest information concerning legal liability, administration/organizational responsibilities; various coaching philosophies, diverse personalities of athletes, developing team cohesion, psychology of coaching and teaching techniques.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 562Kinesiology3.00
Review of materials associated with basic muscle identification, origin, insertion, and muscle function. Students will learn functional concepts associated with agonist and antagonist, the primary lever systems, how the upper and lower chains of the body assist with function from birth to the older age, and how basic biomechanics of daily function assists with or limits everyday activities and overall health. Virtual lab style activities are used to enhance the learning environment and link knowledge to practical application of skills.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 563Exercise Physiology3.00
Introductory lecture and laboratory course examining the acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise. The lecture portion covers the sub-cellular and metabolic responses to exercise, followed by the systemic responses (neuromuscular, endocrine, cardiopulmonary) as well as body composition, environmental factors, gender, aging and training principles. The laboratory section allows students to accent the lecture portion with hands-on laboratory experiences.
HHP 566Principles Of Nutrition3.00
Lecture-discussion course covering the basics of human nutrition including the macro and micro nutrients, the role of nutrition in health, weight loss and weight gain practices, erogenic aids and supplements. Also addresses nutrition through the lifespan and global implications. Students required to complete a comprehensive research paper.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 567Human Sexuality3.00
Covers the biological, sociological, and psychological dimensions of human sexuality. Special emphasis on the education aspects.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 622Adaptive Human Performance (PE) Fieldwork1.00 - 8.00
Work experience with exceptional/special needs individuals. Each credit equals approximately 36 hours of on-the-job experience outside the university.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 624Coaching Students with Special Needs1.00 - 4.00
Theory, principles and practical application of coaching sports for exceptional/special needs students. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course. On demand.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 638Measurement and Evaluation for Human Performance2.00
Introduction to the field of measurement, evaluation and research in human performance. Students are required to complete an independent research project related to their intended profession. Basics of a research proposal, Institutional Review Board and power point presentations are covered.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 656Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology2.00
Psychological and scientific principles as they pertain to understanding participants, sport and exercise environments, group processes, and performance, enhancing health and well-being and facilitating psychological growth and development.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 660Cardiovascular Diagnostics3.00
Introductory survey of theoretical considerations and practical applications of electrocardiography and other cardiac interventions.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 669Pathophysiology of Disease\Prevention and Control3.00
Introductory course of basic pathophysiology including epidemiological basics, infectious and non-infectious diseases, systemic responses, and an in-depth study of the leading causes of death in the United States and Canada (coronary heart disease, cancer, pulmonary disease), as well as common disorders (muscular, skeletal, neurological, gastrointestinal, urological and reproductive systems.) Students are required to complete a comprehensive research paper.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 670Community and Environmental Health3.00
Survey of health and environmental issues as they relate to the global community. The organizations, resources and personnel involved in promotion and maintenance of the health of a community. Also examines health education theories as they relate to creating a professional health promotion plan.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 671Senior Seminar: Community Health Promotion3.00
Development, implementation, and administration of community health promotion programs. Instructor consent is required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 690Independent Study1.00 - 6.00
Intensive investigation of various phases, trends and/or programs in health or human performance. Each student presents a thorough paper on a selected phase, trend or problem in human performance.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 691Fieldwork1.00 - 12.00
Varied opportunities to work in field settings. Each credit equals approximately 36 hours of on-the-job experience outside the university. Normally open to juniors and seniors. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course. Instructor consent is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 692Experiential Learning1.00 - 12.00
Credit for certain non-classroom experiences on campus. Normally open to juniors and seniors. Credit for experience is normally sought prior to its occurrence. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course. Instructor consent is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 694Workshop1.00 - 8.00
Short-term, activity/health oriented course in a specialized area. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course. Instructor consent is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 695Current Topics Seminar1.00 - 12.00
Advanced seminar on major contemporary developments in the area of human performance and athletics.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 696Internship10.00 - 20.00
On-the-job experience with community agencies to provide students with realistic opportunities to apply their skills to practical problems. A student must work at a site a minimum of 450 hours to receive internship credit. Field Experiences Director's consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 700Research Seminar3.00
Advanced seminar to instruct students on the procedures and sources for obtaining the latest information in the field and to provide a forum for discussion of advances in the field. Emphasis on library research, bibliographic data retrieval, writing a seminar paper, and oral presentation of the seminar paper.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 701Legal Liability in Human Performance and Athletics3.00
Case study approach to liabilities that may be encountered by schools and community agencies in their human performance, athletic, intramural and recreational programs. Interpretation of legal precedents and their implications for the organization and management of sports, including, equipment, facilities, supervision, transportation, and handling of injuries.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 702Administration of Athletics3.00
Independent study of the administrative techniques, policies and procedures necessary to successfully administer athletic programs, including current administrative problems.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 703Supervision of Human Performance3.00
History, philosophy, principles and techniques of supervising human performance in the elementary and secondary schools. Professional qualities and preparation of supervisors of student teachers in human performance will also be included.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 704Human Performance Curriculum Development3.00
Current types of instructional programs in elementary, middle and senior high schools. Emphasizes techniques of planning functional human performance curricula considering facilities and staff.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
HLTH - Health
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HLTH 568Drugs, Health and Human Behavior3.00
Current, accurate and documented information about drugs and their use and abuse. Attention will be given to understanding drug abuse, family, prevention, intervention, treatment, and drug-specific information.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HLTH 572Consumer Health2.00
Principles of consumerism are discussed and analyzed with regard to health care products and interventions.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HLTH 589Health Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
HWM - Health & Wellness Management
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HWM 700Contemporary Health and Wellness Perspectives3.00
In this course, students will examine health and wellness concepts and probe foundational thinking associated with the contemporary health and wellness field. Expectations and development of the wellness professional will be explored.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Health and Wellness Program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HWM 705Strategic Management for Wellness Managers3.00
This course introduces students to management concepts to create strategic direction and the role of leadership in setting strategy capable of meeting competitive challenges within the wellness industry. Topics include key management theories; role of stakeholders; issue identification; program evaluation; and business plan development.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Health and Wellness Program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HWM 710Research Methods for Wellness Programs3.00
This course covers research methods and designs relevant to wellness program managers. Students will be introduced to various research designs including experimental and nonexperimental, as well as quantitative and qualitative research methods. The course will focus on providing a practical understanding of several statistical tools used in wellness-related research.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Health and Wellness Program
HWM 715Persuasion Skills for Wellness Managers3.00
In this course, students will develop communication and persuasion skills, which are essential for wellness managers. Utilizing a variety of media and techniques, students will hone their communication skills. Students will apply key marketing concepts to mount effective marketing campaigns for their organization.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Health and Wellness Program
HWM 720Exercise and Nutrition in Health and Disease3.00
This course introduces students to the roles that physical activity and nutritional practices play in the prevention, management, and treatment of chronic diseases and conditions such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, COPD, arthritis, depression and anxiety.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Health and Wellness Program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HWM 730Biopsychosocial Aspects of Health3.00
This course is a survey of biological, psychological and social-environmental aspects of wellness. Taking an applied focus, students will learn current theoretical and evidenced-based approaches in psychology, integrative medicine, and behavioral economics that impact wellness.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Health and Wellness Program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HWM 740Health Systems and Policy for Wellness Managers3.00
This course provides information pertaining to the US Health Care system with emphasis on health and wellness. It provides an overview of the major public and private stakeholders including public health, insurance, and health care providers. Participants will examine how health policy impacts the design and financing of wellness programs.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Health and Wellness Program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HWM 750Planning and Evaluation for Wellness Managers3.00
This purpose of this course is to examine planning and evaluation as inter-related, cyclical activities. Students will examine major activities and processes involved in planning and evaluating wellness programs.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of HWM 705 and HWM 710
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HWM 760Wellness Law3.00
This course introduces students to the legal and ethical environment of wellness management. Topics include the Affordable Care Act, Americans with Disabilities Act and HIPAA. Students will learn effective negotiation skills that can be used when dealing with contracts and vendors.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Health and Wellness Program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HWM 770Behavior and Development in Organizations3.00
In this course, students will study organizations, their members and why people and groups behave as they do. Processes and methods that improve behavior, effectiveness, and efficiency in organizational settings will be examined. The course will also cover various methods for assessing organizational behavior and change.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Health and Wellness Program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HWM 780Best Practices and Emerging Issues in Wellness3.00
In this course, students will study emerging trends, innovations, and best practices in the health and wellness industry with emphasis on preventative health care. Students will investigate major health challenges, programs, and policies to determine the influence of social, economic, multicultural, and global pressures on successful wellness practices
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of HWM 700, 705, 710, 720, and 730.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HWM 790Health and Wellness Management Capstone Course3.00
This course provides a cohesive experience designed to synthesize and apply information from the MS HWM curricula. Students complete an individual capstone experience that demonstrates thorough understanding of the knowledge, skills and disposition necessary to be a successful health and wellness manager.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of HWM 780
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
IDS - Interdisciplinary Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
IDS 500Study Abroad Placeholder Graduate0.00
Study Abroad Placeholder Graduate
IDS 720Emotional Intelligence in Therapeutic Settings3.00
This course explores and develops competencies of emotional intelligence as applied within therapeutic settings. We will apply a collaborative approach to learning through experiential learning opportunities that develop awareness and skills.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
 
ITM - Information Technology Management
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ITM 700Communications for IT Professionals3.00
This course focuses on developing communication skills for IT professionals. Students will learn how to deliver effective presentations, conduct crucial conversations with stakeholders, and develop verbal and nonverbal communication skills emphasizing cultural sensitivity, diversity, and ethics. Students will also conduct relevant research and critically evaluate information to make informed evidence-based decisions.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Information Technology Management program
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITM 705Leading the IT Function3.00
This course focuses on the differences between and application of management and leadership theories in an IT environment. Utilizing an array of assessment activities, students will identify and understand one’s own personal assets and liabilities to become an effective leader and agent of change in a complex adaptive system.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Information Technology Management program
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITM 710Finance for IT Managers3.00
This course will frame financial decisions within general and project accounting principles. Topics include: pro forma financial statements, time value of money, cash flows and equivalence, depreciation, net present value, rate of return, and ratio analysis. Students will prepare budgets that prioritize projects within constraints, address uncertainty and intangibles, and integrate with project scheduling.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Information Technology Management program
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITM 715Data Science3.00
This course examines key data science concepts, methods, and processes. It addresses issues for developing, managing and supporting data-driven decision-making in the organization and provides knowledge and tools for incorporating data science into IT project workflows. Topics include, but are not limited to, data analytics, data warehousing, machine learning, and artificial intelligence.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS Information Technology Management Program and ITM 710.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITM 720Cloud Computing and Enterprise Applications3.00
Students will learn to leverage cloud services to streamline computing resources, deploy enterprise applications, improve user access and system reliability, and utilize advanced computing capabilities. Foundation concepts include: virtualization, multi-tenant architecture, and software defined networking. Examines the full range of services available to organizations along with deployment strategies, evaluation criteria, economic justification, and manageability.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS Information Technology Management Program and ITM 710.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITM 725Enterprise Security3.00
Students will explore the technical, administrative, and physical aspects of IT security. They will investigate various threats within IT and fraud and apply information classification to the design of information, network and physical security. Students will evaluate the business processes of risk, business continuity, audit, and the risk within software development.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the MS Information Technology Management program and ITM 700
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITM 730Agile and Traditional IT Project Management3.00
This course examines project management concepts as applied to IT projects and covers traditional PMBOK techniques such as project identification, selection, procurement, and cost/schedule preparation and monitoring. Students will be introduced to agile IT project management concepts including Scrum and Extreme Programming. This course requires students to apply these concepts to group projects.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS Information Technology Management Program and ITM 700 and 710.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITM 735Business Analysis and System Development3.00
This course focuses on the importance, role, and techniques of the business analysis function in the modern IT organization. This course is organized around the six knowledge areas and associated techniques of the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge (BABOK) specified by the International Institute of Business Analysis.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the MS Information Technology Management program and ITM 730.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITM 740IT Operations3.00
This course explores best practices and techniques for ensuring the smooth functioning of the IT infrastructure and operational environments to support development and deployment of applications and services within the organization. Coverage includes network infrastructure; servers and devices; computer operations; service management; facilities; help desk services, DevOps, and process automation.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the MS Information Technology Management program and ITM 735.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITM 745IT Governance, Ethics, and Regulatory Compliance3.00
This course examines best practices in IT governance to achieve regulatory compliance, optimize use of available resources, ensure trustworthiness of enterprise information, and support business strategies and objectives. Topics include: strategic alignment, IT service and control frameworks, portfolio management, IT risk management, and ethical issues in IT governance.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the MS Information Technology Management program and ITM 735
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITM 750Evaluation of Emerging Technologies3.00
This seminar course researches, identifies and evaluates significant new trends, technologies and events influencing the global environment of information technology and systems. The course will evaluate future and disruptive technologies, strategies for successful implementation of innovative technologies, critical thinking, and ethics pertaining to its use
Prerequisites:
Admission to the MS Information Technology Management program and ITM 740.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITM 754Capstone Preparation1.00
Students select their capstone project, create a plan, define deliverables, secure approval and complete setup of their development environment. Students review concepts necessary for completion of the capstone including Agile project management, systems analysis and communicating with technical and non-technical audiences. Additional topics may be included.
Prerequisites:
Admission to MS in Information Technology Management program
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITM 755Capstone3.00
In this course, students complete the projects approved in the Capstone Preparation course. This course includes the management, development and delivery of an information technology project to a client or employer, including regular communication of status to both technical and non-technical audiences
Prerequisites:
Admission to the MS Information Technology Management program and ITM 754
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
LIBS - Library Science
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
LIBS 503Information Resources and Services3.00
Principles and philosophies of library reference service, information literacy, reading, listening and viewing guidance, and information resources with special emphasis on the Application of Wisconsin Model Academic Standards within the school library media center. Knowledge and use of major reference resources as well as discussions of strategies for effective information services.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LIBS 507Selecting and Organizing Library Resources3.00
Develops the ability to build and maintain resource collections by studying the principles and practices of selection, acquisition, and evaluation for resources to support the library's goals. Includes the study and application of standardized procedures for classifying and cataloging resources and maintaining electronics systems of collections.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LIBS 509Information Literacy Leadership3.00
Introduction to information literacy program development in a range of libraries. Examines leadership roles as they relate to information literacy and the collaborative teaching responsibility of librarians.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LIBS 510Young Adult Literature3.00
Examination of the range of print and mediated literature available to young adults. Criteria for evaluation, selection, and guidance in use to meet both student and curriculum uses are discussed. An appreciation for the literature is developed through experiences in reading, viewing, and classroom reporting.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LIBS 525Administration of Library Media Programs3.00
Introduction to administration of library/media programs with emphasis on leadership in the library/media program, the school, and the broader community of the library/media program and the library/media specialist profession. Examines the state and national guidelines appropriate to library/ media programs.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LIBS 606Children's Literature3.00
Study of the various types of fiction and nonfiction literatures published for, used with, or selected by children birth to age 12. Emphasis is on using children's literature across the content area with best practice instruction. Includes the selection, evaluation, appreciation, and use of children's literature and related media. Explores methods to help develop a child's interest in reading and ability to appreciate quality children's literature.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
LIBS 612Trends-Issues K-12 Literature3.00
Examination of literature for children and young adults published within the last 10 years. Includes reading and discussion of the literature and trends in children's and young adult reading. Also includes examination of current selection aids and other resources for teachers and librarians serving children and young adults. Topics include current thought on the digital age, internet and intellectual freedom issues, and the teaching of both children's and young adult literature in the classroom. Summer only.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
LIBS 616Advanced Administration of School Library Media Programs3.00
Focus on advanced preparation for work in the field of school library administration, including building as well as district perspective. Topics to be included are: the school library media specialist's role in school improvement, collaboration with teachers, and the importance of networking with the school, within the district, and in the professional field. Emphasis on "real world" issues affecting administration of school libraries, with discussion of current trends in the field. Summer only.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
LIBS 635Technology for Teaching and Learning3.00
Effective use of technology with students and faculty to facilitate teaching and learning. Educational media selection, design, production, and instructional delivery to meet Wisconsin and Minnesota information and technology literacy standards. Management and planning concepts for technology in schools and libraries.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LIBS 640Information Literacy3.00
LIBS 645Integrating Technology in the Library Media Program3.00
Use of educational theory to select, design, and implement advanced information and instructional technologies in the library media program. Development of skills in planning and providing organizational professional development, and in appropriate use of intellectual property in teaching and learning
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LIBS 650Topics in Library Science1.00 - 3.00
Concentrated study of current special or advanced topics/issues in librarianship. Topics are selected by library faculty based upon student/library community interest. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Summer only.
LIBS 685Library Practice1.00 - 3.00
Supervised practice in library situations providing opportunity for practical application of library principles. Primarily for those in non-teaching areas. Requires consent of the instructor. (N.B. For prospective teachers the practicum in school library media centers is included in the student teacher's professional sequence.)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
LIBS 690Supervised School Library Practicum Combined3.00
This course provides licensed teachers in the school library program with the opportunity to fully develop, practice, and reflect upon skills acquired through coursework in a supervised field experience in an elementary and a secondary school library and work in their own schools, as appropriate. Students create a portfolio demonstrating mastery of program competencies. Prerequisites: Graduate status, consent of instructor, completion of at least 21 credits at UW-Superior, 3.10 GPA in library media courses taken before entering the library media practicum.
LIBS 699Directed Studies in Librarianship1.00 - 3.00
Individualized study of a particular area or problem in librarianship. Topic selected requires approval of the instructor within the program who will be directing the study. May be taken in several units providing a different topic is taken each time.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
MATH - Mathematics
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
MATH 681Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in mathematical sciences. May be repeated when topics are different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
MUSED - Music Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
MUSED 515General Music (515) at the EC-A (74)0.00 - 3.00
Licensure in General Music: Post baccalaureate program leading to licensure in General Music (515) at the EC-A (74) level in the Teaching category. Program for music educators seeking additional licensure in music education, specifically, general music.
Prerequisites:
Must hold a BME in Choral or Instrumental Music Education. Contact the UW-S Music Education Coordinator for individually designed program plan and approval.
 
PHYS - Physics
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
PHYS 681Special Topics1.00 - 6.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in physics selected by the faculty on the basis of community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study. May be repeated when topics are different. Instructor consent required.
 
PSYC - Psychology
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
PSYC 789Psychology Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
 
SMGT - Sustainable Management
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
SMGT 700Cultural and Historical Foundations of Sustainability3.00
The changing relationships of humans to the natural environment; changes in dominant scientific perspectives and the process of scientific debate. The quest for understanding, manipulating, and dominating the natural world. Cultural and organizational structures; the role and impact of technology; the systems approach to problem solving and its implications for the future.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 710The Natural Environment3.00
Natural cycles, climate, water, energy, bio-systems, eco-systems, the role of humans in the biosphere; human impacts on natural systems. Use of case studies; some pre-reading, carbon cycle as a unifying theme. Disturbance pollution and toxicity; carrying capacity; natural capital.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 720Applied Research and the Triple Bottom Line3.00
Document and project internal and external costs resulting from the inseparability of the natural, social and economic environments. Assess sustainability issues using basic modeling techniques; cause and effect, root cause analysis, regression analysis and business scenario based cases.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 730Policy, Law and Ethics of Sustainability3.00
The Law and Ethics regarding sustainability of Economic development and emerging environmental challenges at national and international levels; including National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Carbon Footprints, Kyoto protocol, and Brundtland Commission. The policy and role of government and its agencies such as Army Corps of Engineers; Department of Interior, etc., in building a more just, prosperous, and secure environmental common future.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 740Economics of Sustainability3.00
Understand the economy as a component of the ecosystem within which it resides, with natural capital added to the typical analysis of human, social, built, and financial capital. Explore traditional micro, macro, and international trade theory and policy and the implications of sustainability. Topics include: history of economic systems and thought; globalization and localization; distinguishing between growth and development; the nature and causes of market failure; consumption, consumerism, and human well-being; emerging markets; technological change; business organization and financial market alternatives; demographic change; and the global food economy.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 750The built Environment3.00
Explore how the built environment came to be and the intersection of human needs: water, air, food, water, waste, transportation, healthcare and education. Evaluate community design: what does a sustainable community look like? Study related technologies and evaluate alternatives, discuss unintended consequences. Course will include case studies.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 760Geopolitical Systems3.00
An examination of decision making and public policy for sustainability at the national, state, and local level, with emphasis on the social, economic, political factors affecting decisions within both the public and private sectors. Attention is given to formal American policy making processes, informal grassroots activities and consensus building, public engagement with sustainability decisions, corporate sustainability actions and reporting, the promise of public-private partnerships and collaborative decision making, and practical examples of how decision making fosters effective transitions to sustainability goals at all levels.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 770Leading Sustainable Organizations3.00
A macro-level perspective on leading sustainable organizations. Topics addressed include: organizational change and transformation processes, strategic and creative thinking, organizational structures and their impacts, conflict management and negotiation, stake holder management and situational leadership styles and behaviors. Focuses on how organizational leaders develop and enable sustainable organizations, especially in times of environmental change.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 780Corporate Social Responsibility3.00
Corporate social responsibility and an organization. Evaluation of risks and potential impacts in decision making recognizing the links between the success of an organization and the well being of a community. Integrating corporate social responsibility throughout an organization, creating metrics and communicating CSR policies internally and externally. Development of best practices in an organization pertaining to corporate social responsibility.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 782Supply Chain Management3.00
Planning, organizing and controlling the organization's supply chain is examined in context of the triple bottom line. Total cost analyses or product and process life cycles are considered in the context of strategy and operations. Topics include: sourcing, operations, distribution, reverse logistics and service supply chains. Process measurements and the impact on organizational performance in the context of footprints (e.g. carbon, water, pollution). Discussion of existing and potential software systems.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 784Sustainable Water Management3.00
This course addresses practical applications of sustainability in aquatic environments. Topics covered include water and health, water quality and quantity, governance, assessing the aquatic environment, water treatment technologies, environmental mitigation, and impacts of climate change. Emphasis will be on selected areas of interest from the perspective of public health, engineering, and municipal conservation management.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
SMGT 785Waste Management and Resource Recovery3.00
Topics include the generation, processing, management and disposal of municipal, industrial and agricultural waste with an emphasis on the technical, economic and environmental aspects of various recovery processes. Additional topics will include producer responsibility, design for environment and life cycle analysis.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 790Capstone Preparation Course1.00
Research, data analysis, scholarly inquiry resulting in project proposal.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 792Capstone Project3.00
Completion of approved project utilizing concepts from coursework.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SMGT 795Special Topics in Sustainable Management3.00
Various specialized areas of sustainable management will be examined. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
SMGT 799Study Abroad3.00
Study abroad courses are conducted in various parts of the world and are led by one or more faculty members. This course may be repeated in different locations.
Prerequisites:
Admission to M.S. in SMGT Program.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
SPED - Special Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
SPED 681Seminars in Special Education0.50 - 4.00
Selected topics and issues in the area of special education. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or issue is studied each time.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
SPED 704Assessment of Learners with Exceptionalities3.00
Addresses the study of measurement theory and basic statistics needed for understanding assessment for the purposes of eligibility for services within special education. Also focuses on general test construction, appropriate instrument selection with awareness of limitations, multicultural, and ethical considerations. Assessment interpretation and IEP preparation is examined in depth. Students experience the administration, interpretation and reporting of a select sample of assessment tools
SPED 710Neurocognition3.00
This course provides a survey of current research in cognitive neuroscience on language, memory, learning, perception and other higher cognitive functions. Neurocognition involves learning about the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, along with some coverage of the endocrine system. Presentation of course material is based on typical and atypical development and functioning. Illustrative pathological development and atypical conditions are reviewed as well, such as developmental dyslexia, autistic disorders, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
SPED 750The Exceptional Learner3.00
Students research the various federally identified disability groupings of exceptionalities including examination of the effect of federal, state, and local laws and policies on education for students with these exceptionalities. Historical perspectives, legislation and litigation provide background for discussion of current models, theories and philosophies of special education today. Students complete an analysis related to current legislation, regulations, policies and/or ethical issues surrounding educational services for students with exceptionalities. The focus of this class will be through the legal lens focusing on current laws, policies, and practices in the field.
SPED 755Reading-Issues & Interventions3.00
Investigate the various aspects of reading challenges so that educators can provide effective reading instruction to readers of various abilities. Strategies for diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties at the elementary and secondary levels will be considered. Fieldwork with students who struggle in reading will be required.
SPED 756Increasing the Rigor in Reading Instruction for Diverse Learners3.00
Deep study of the use of informational text to support reading comprehension so that educators can provide effective reading instruction to readers of various abilities. Strategies for raising the rigor in reading and writing will be explored at the elementary and secondary level. Fieldwork with students who struggle in reading will be required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
SPED 758Methods of Adaptive Instruction3.00
Students observe, research and reflect upon methods, strategies, and materials for adapting curricula to meet the learning needs of students with mild to severe high-incidence exceptional educational needs. Emphasizes knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to evaluate students' academic and social needs, research and design appropriate curricula,make modifications and adaptations throughout and across curricular, differentiate curriculum and instruction, and use research-based teaching strategies. Students modify an existing curricular element and practice the modification with one or more students in the field.
SPED 760Behavior Analysis and Intervention3.00
Students research and discuss behavior theories, strategies and programs, functional analysis of behavior, positive behavior interventions and strategies, RTI, and behavior intervention plans. Students collect data to create a behavior intervention plan and apply it within an educational setting. Course emphasizes the application of theory to the academic and behavioral development of school-age children, especially those with exceptional educational needs and provides practice in communicating those applications and principles to parents, teachers and other community stakeholders.
SPED 764Mathematics Assessment and Strategies3.00
Examines assessment procedures and teaching strategies appropriate to providing instruction to students having difficulty learning mathematics. Emphasis is on differentiating and adapting existing curriculum to assist all students in reaching the goals of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM 2000).
SPED 769Collaboration and Transition: From School to Community3.00
Working with families and community agencies is the focus of this class. The use of facilitating planning meetings with families will be an emphasis as well as establishing partnerships with community agencies that serve the variety of needs of families with students who have disabilities. In addition, there will be concentration on transitions skills - from each level of schooling to another and then on to post secondary options.
SPED 772Collaboration and Consultation in Special Education3.00
Focus on the major issues of learning and reflecting upon the skills and dispositions necessary for managing a special education classroom and/or case load. Includes curriculum design and evaluation, collaboration with multiple stakeholders, time management, assistive technology and universal design.
SPED 775Special Education Directed Student Teaching1.50
Field-based experience in teaching students who have severe to mild exceptional educational needs in the areas of learning disabilities, cognitive disabilities and emotional behavioral disabilities. Students may choose one or more concentrations from the above listed disability areas. A student seminar meets online for study and discussion. Student complete and present a professional Special Educator portfolio.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SPED 776Special Education Directed Student Teaching1.50
Field-based experience in teaching students who have severe to mild exceptional educational needs in the areas of learning disabilities, cognitive disabilities and emotional behavioral disabilities. Students may choose one or more concentrations from the above listed disability areas. A student seminar meets regularly for study and discussion. Student complete and present a professional Special Educator portfolio.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SPED 780Action Research Methodology3.00
Focus on research methodology and topics specific to the field of education. Complete an action research project surrounding an issue of interest/need in your classroom or program through the use of a single subject design. Examine existing research and determine how it may apply to your classroom/program.
SPED 781Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Uniquely designed study arranged with a particular instructor which allows the graduate student to pursue specific areas of need or interest. Approval of the topic and plan of study is required before enrollment.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
SPED 784Action Research Project3.00
Complete the Action Research Project developed in Action Research Methods. Collect data, create Action Plan, and present to the constituents of the project - staff, faculty, and/or school board.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
T ED - Teacher Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
T ED 581Selected Topics and Problems in the Area of Teacher Education0.50 - 3.00
Offered only as Continuing Education credits. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or program is studied each time as requested.
T ED 589Teacher Education Elective1.00 - 99.00
Teacher Education Elective
T ED 607The Middle School and Its Students3.00
Provides students with an understanding of the history, philosophy, organization, curriculum, teaching patterns, and particular student needs of middle-level educational institutions. Particular emphasis placed on the planning and maintenance of a school and classroom environment suited to middle-level students to prepare middle-level teachers with the background necessary to teach and work in middle-level schools with students aged 10-14. Pre-Student Teaching Clinical experience required. This course should be taken the semester prior to student teaching. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 686Administration of Child Development Programs3.00
Focuses on the rapidly changing field of child development programming. Emphasis on developing the business skills and knowledge that every director must have: funding, budgeting, selecting, training and supervising staff, housing the program, purchasing the equipment, and implementing a standards-based evaluation for the program. Specific licensing procedures, grant writing, and program accreditation are also covered in considerable depth. Designing accessible programs for both typical and atypically developing children is emphasized. Peer-to-Peer teaching event required. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
T ED 689Teacher Education Elective1.00 - 99.00
Teacher Education Elective
T ED 694Principles and Practices of Inclusive Teaching3.00
Involves the principles inherent in the educational process for integrating children with exceptional needs into the general education school environment (K-12). Designed specifically for the study of the inclusion of students with special educational needs into the general education program and development of teacher skills and knowledge to support this placement.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 699Directed Studies in Teacher Education0.50 - 6.00
Allows the student with special needs and interests to pursue particular areas and problems in education. The problem and/or plan of study requires approval of the instructor within the department who will be directing the study.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 711Mathematics Assessment and Strategies2.00
Examines assessment procedures and teaching strategies appropriate to providing instruction to students having difficulty learning mathematics. Emphasis on differentiating and adapting existing curriculum to assist all students in reaching the goals of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM 2000).
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
T ED 712Education for the 21st Century3.00
Fosters the study of historical, philosophical, and social foundations underlying the development, purposes, organization, and issues of K-12 education in the USA. Topics also include legal, ethical, political, and economic aspects, governance, roles and responsibilities of agencies and associations, and trends. [Paper on development of content specialization as an educational area and present practices and pedagogical issues would be a course assignment.] Basics in multicultural and non-sexist education, positive and appropriate portrayal of diversity, disabilities, and instructional strategies that build inclusivity are covered. (15 hours of observation and or tutoring.) Course specifically supports professional development in relation to Wisconsin teacher standards 1, 9, and 10 toward Professional Educator licenses; and INTASC and National Board Standards. (Sequence level 1)
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
T ED 713Development and Learning Theories3.00
Examines theories of typical and atypical child and adolescent development (physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and moral). Special emphasis is given to understanding and applications of learning theories and approaches that fit with development levels and enhance learning. Course begins to address diverse learners, motivation, management, and climate for learning that is appropriate for developmental levels. (15 hours of observation and or tutoring.) Course specifically supports professional development in relation to Wisconsin teacher standards 1, 2, 3 and 4 toward Professional Educator licenses; and INTASC and National Board Standards. (Sequence level 1)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
T ED 716Alternative Education for Non-Traditional Learners3.00
Reaching students with discouraged, difficult, and alternative learning styles is a must in today's classroom. This course will assist in building your understanding and effectiveness in reaching students who are subject to non-traditional cultural, family, and societal issues that impact their learning needs.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 717Effective Practices in Alternative Education3.00
What philosophy, strategies, and research can be combined to meet the intellectual, personal, and social needs of diverse learners in today's schools? Answering this question in a team approach with parents, students, and other professionals will lead you to a group of effective strategies for what works in alternative education.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 718Leadership Development for Educators/Trainers3.00
Leadership development is a broad concept with many varying interpretations. Leadership is not only about leading, but also about managing and sometimes following. Participants will better understand their own leadership style and that of their followers. Both the science and art involved in leadership will be explored. Readings and discussions will be used to better understand some of the more common theories of leadership and leadership development.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 724Teaching as Reflective Decision Making: Professional Development for 21st Century3.00
Students clarify their professional needs and philosophies using understandings of current issues and license renewal processes, and reflective tasks regarding their own practice. For Wisconsin teachers and other teachers building a professional development plan/portfolio, this course offers support in identifying and reflecting on professional strengths and weaknesses in relation to standards in the field, and setting goals for professional development, as required by license renewal under Wisconsin PI34. Course specifically supports professional development in relation to Wisconsin teacher standards 1, 9, and 10 toward both the Professional and Master Educator licenses; and INTASC and National Board Standards.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
T ED 728Diversity Exploration in a K-12 Setting3.00
Examination of the issues related to inequities and inequalities in PK-12 classrooms. Explores diversity in education from an historical perspective to inform teaching practices regarding race, culture, class, and gender. Considers power dynamics, pedagogy, and ideologies that frame education in our schools.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
T ED 734Current Developments in Student Learning and Their Applications3.00
Study of foundational and recent theories in learning, motivation, and learning environments, and their practical implementation in today's array of classroom. Focuses on how students learn and how to effect student engagement.
T ED 739Workshop in Supervision of Student Teachers1.00
Participants are informed of the policies, procedures and methods used in the supervision of student teachers at UW-Superior. Aimed primarily at teachers who teach subjects and grade levels for which there are shortages of approved cooperating teachers.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 740Seminar in Supervision of Student Teachers/Interns2.00
Study of policies, procedures and methods used in supervision of student teachers and interns. Open to those who are actual or potential supervisors of student teachers and interns, and is a requirement for teachers who will serve as cooperating teachers in the student teaching and internship program.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 741Using Educational Assessment to Inform Practice3.00
Study of the principles followed in constructing, using and analyzing formal and informal assessment tasks, tools, standardized tests and results of educational research in the classroom.
T ED 744Trends in Curricular and Instructional Practices3.00
Engages teachers in analyzing and reflecting on current developments and practices in curriculum planning and instructional strategies in k-12 classrooms.
T ED 750Research Foundations of Education3.00
Research process as it relates to classroom teaching. Focus is on research design and methodology (quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods) as well as the practitioner's role in initiating and utilizing research. Students create a research proposal and plan.
T ED 752Educational Research Project3.00
Students design and carry out a research project with the advice and approval of the advisor and special area consultant. Upon completion and approval of the research project by the advisor and consultant, the student gives an oral presentation of the paper to faculty and students.
T ED 754School Law for Classroom Teachers3.00
Study the legal framework within which all school employees must operate. Emphasis on laws and sources of laws which affect students, teachers, and instruction.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
T ED 781Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Specially designed studies to allow the graduate student to pursue specific areas of need or interest. Approval of the topic of study and the plan of study by the instructor directing the study is required before enrollment.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 789Teacher Education Elective1.00 - 99.00
Teacher Education Elective
 
WRIT - Writing
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
WRIT 680Writing and Healing3.00
Exploration of theoretical and applied aspects of writing and healing. Forms studied and practiced may include poetry, story-telling, journaling, guided autobiography, and/or creative nonfiction, with focus on restorative benefits of narrative and imagistic writing.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
WRIT 695Directed Studies in Writing1.00 - 3.00
Supervised graduate study and research in Writing. Repeatable up to nine credits.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
WRIT 698Prior Learning Portfolio1.00
Facilitation of student's creation of a portfolio that documents prior learning. Reflection and analysis of prior learning experiences to articulate knowledge, understanding, and skills that may meet graduate-level learning outcomes. Designed for students with significant work and life experiences.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms