2019-21 Undergraduate Catalog Course Descriptions

GST - Gender Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
GST 150Introduction to Gender Studies3.00
Introduction to Gender Studies explores various answers to the question: How does gender influence the way in which we interact with and are impacted by society? To that end, this course introduces students to feminist perspectives and challenges students to incorporate self-exploration with academic skill to analyze one's personal experience, and the experience of others, within social institutions such as family, government, employment, religion, and education through the lens of gender. We will examine how issues of gender within our society intersect with race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, differing abilities, and age to perpetuate a system of oppression.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GST 189Gender Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GST 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/GST 210.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GST 255Gender and Sexuality in Writing3.00
Explores writing on gender and sexuality with a focus on texts by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex (LGBTQI) and allied writers from diverse cultures, classes, races, and ethnicities. Students discover and deepen their own perspectives through writing and reading. Students of all genders and gender identities are welcome. Cross listed as WRIT/GST 255. Course includes Academic Service-Learning (AS-L) high-impact practice.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 258Gender, Psychology and Society3.00
Discussion and study of development of gender roles across the lifespan. Topics include the social construction of sex and gender differences, status and power, feminist psychology, childhood and adolescence, relationships, family, work and achievement, and diversity. Meets the Diverse Perspectives requirement for Psychology major. Meets a requirement for the Gender Studies minor. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course, involving a 15-hour community placement commitment (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). Cross-listed as PSYC/GST 258.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 270Psychology of Men and Masculinity3.00
This course is devoted to exploring men's experience in society, the cultural messages men receive about masculinity, and the implications of these for behavior and mental health. Topics include: ideology about the transition from boyhood to manhood, the privileges and perils of manhood status, men's friendships, work primacy, health issues, intimacy and power issues with women, negotiating male sexuality, male violence, and assumptions regarding men's role in the family unit. This is a course for both women and men about issues related to the social construction of masculinity in our culture. Cross-listed as PSYC/GST 270. Meets the Diverse Perspectives requirement for Psychology major.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
GST 289Gender Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GST 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements, consult your advisor. The course can be repeated only if the content is different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GST 310Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective3.00
Examines the cultural construction of gender from an anthropological, cross-cultural perspective. Attention is paid to sociocultural factors such as kinship, colonialism, industrialism, and economic development which influence gender definitions, roles, and the structure of gender relations. Cross-listed as ANTH/GST 310.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
GST 312Gender,Crime,and Justice3.00
Exploration of the social construction of gender in crime and delinquency as well as in justice systems; analysis of how assumptions about female and male natures, as well as appropriate roles and positions in society affect the interpretation and application of law; comparison of women/girls and men/boys as offenders, victims and practitioners. Cross-listed as CJUS/GST 312.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GST 317Men and Women in Nazi Germany3.00
In this upper-division examination of the nature of Nazi society and Fascism more generally, the central focus will be on gender--the images of and attitudes towards masculinity and femininity, and alternative sexualities, in the Third Reich. Changes in the role afforded to men and women, and in beliefs about what it means to be male and female, were at the very center of the revolutionary changes that constituted the shift to the "Modern Era." In seeking to understand Fascist attitudes toward gender, therefore, the course is seeking to understand not some peripheral aspect of Nazi society, but its very core, the very essence of modern democracy and its nemesis, Fascism. Much attention will be focused on developing skill in understanding and interpreting films and other visual artifacts and how they reveal ideals and assumptions about gender. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 317. Code 1. G.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 322The Construction of Gender in the United States3.00
An examination of gender and sexual identities and roles in the United States from colonial times through the present. Explores the evolution of these roles and identities and the social, economic, and political forces that shape them. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 322. G.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 329Women In Art3.00
Women's expression in painting and sculpture, primarily of the 19th and 20th Centuries.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 365Philosophy of Love and Sex3.00
In this course we will begin with the assumption that love and sex cannot be reduced to "a commotion of one's anatomy." Instead we will consider them as two of the most meaningful aspects of human existence, as our most intimate and profound ways of relating to others and to ourselves. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 365.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GST 374Women and Politics3.00
In the United States, women hold 18% of the seats in the 112th Congress, marking the nation 85th in its level of representation for women. Globally, women constitute 15% of all members of parliament, although significant regional variation persists. How do gendered hierarchies continue to shape and structure political systems? Why have women not yet reached parity in elected office? Should women be represented as women? What difference do women bring to elective office? These and other questions are explored throughout the course, with particular attention to the historical exclusion of women from the public arena, the methods used by women to enter electoral and activist politics, and the current political status of women in the United States and globally. Cross-listed as POLS/GST 374.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 389Gender Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GST 393Women, Colonialism, and Nationalism in Modern Southeast Asia3.00
This upper-division seminar examines the role women played in Southeast Asian history from the 19th century till the present, specifically as the region confronted the challenges of colonialism and post-colonial nation-building. Among key issues covered are (1) the encounter between Western guns and local political systems; (2) race and racism (or, why the other group is always a barbarian); (3) how Southeast Asia became “modern”; (4) decolonization and/or revolution; (4) political, economic and religious challenges in post-colonial nationalism; (5) the intimate and everyday lives of Southeast Asians; and so on. We will work through these themes through the lens of the role of women and women’s groups, examining Western tourists, governesses and wives; sex, prostitution and the control of VD; colonial-era marriage with “white guys” and the biracial children; Islam and women; and post-colonial women political leaders. We will examine these issues within the framework of the political, social, economic and cultural interactions between Britain, France, Holland, the United States of America, China, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar/Burma. In addition to reading a selection of secondary and primary materials, including poems, biographies, memoirs, and histories, students will also watch music videos and films to understand and analyze the issues. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 393. Code 3. G.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
GST 411Bodies: Sociology of the Flesh3.00
Examines the role of society in understanding and relating to biology, especially the human body. We tend to think of the body as a “given”, but in this class we will explore how the body and our relationship to it has changed dramatically over place and time. We will analyze how bodies are used as grounds for inequality, including not only those rooted in gender but also race, disability, size, and social class. This course also counts for credit toward the Gender Studies minor. Cross-listed as SOCI/GST 411.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 413Complex Identities: Global Race, Class, and Gender3.00
Examines race, class, gender, and other major aspects of social identity as intersecting phenomena, including some of their cousins: colonialism, patriarchy, marginalization, and racism. We look carefully at the ways each of these systems of power shifts and influences the others by assuming an intersectional perspective throughout the course. This course has a specifically global emphasis, looking at how seemingly fixed identities like race change radically in different parts of the globe. This course also counts for credit toward the Gender Studies minor. Cross-listed as SOCI/GST 413.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101, GST 210, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
GST 456Feminist Theory and Action3.00
Seminar course providing a deeper look at feminist thought, building on the introduction provided in GST 150. Through readings and films, examines conversations, controversies, and connections among a range of feminist thinkers. Students explore the intersections of feminist thought and action, reading a variety of calls to action and articulating their own. Cross-listed as POLS/GST 456.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GST 150 or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 459Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering3.00
This course will explore pregnancy, childbirth, and mothering from two perspectives-the embodied experience of women and its political-social context. We will consider how women's firsthand experiences of motherhood are responses to a broader social milieu. This approach will enable us to think about a variety of philosophical themes and questions with regard to our topic including: philosophical method, embodiment, sex and gender, the origins of ethics, moral obligation, virtue, moral luck, intersubjectivity, and oppression. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 459.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
GST 460The Study of First Nations Women3.00
Exploration of the First Nations woman's social roles and lifestyles from a variety of tribal cultures in North America. Focuses on traditional and contemporary values and roles of First Nations women. Cross-listed as FNS/GST 460.
GST 489Gender Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GST 490Special Topics in Women's Studies1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in Women's Studies selected by the instructor. Course may be repeated for credit when instructor and/or topics are different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GST 499Independent Study1.00 - 3.00
Supervised independent study and/or research in Women's Studies. May be supervised by any current member of the Women's Studies faculty.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Women's Study minor, and completion of at least 3 credits in GST and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand