2019-21 Undergraduate Catalog Course Descriptions

HIST - History
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HIST 104The History of Human Origins3.00
A history of human origins from the fish who crawled out of the sea to early hominids to the peopling of the continents. Uses fossil, archaeological, experimental archaeological, linguistic, oral narrative and genetic evidence. Honors the origin narratives of diverse peoples. All religious views welcome. Many films. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST 104. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 111Modern World History3.00
Focuses on themes rather than chronology. Students follow the growing globalization of the world through the study of themes like nationalism, industrialization, imperialism, capitalism, decolonization, technologies, gender, race, everyday lives, world systems, migration and Diaspora. Will employ analysis of primary documents, photographs, maps, music, films or other sources of history and build skills of effective writing, clear presentations, use of convincing evidence, increasing geographic literacy and placing the history of specific regions in a global context. Aims to provide an introduction to the discipline of history and its methods. Emphasis on learning to think globally. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 112The Ancient Mediterranean World3.00
General-education-level course introducing students to the basic outlines of the history of the Mediterranean region -- including Greece, Rome, Spain, northern Africa, and Palestine -- from the earliest times to the Middle Ages. While investigating some key events and stories from these places and times, students learn to critically evaluate the ways these stories are re-told in our time, using actual texts and documents from the times in comparison to books and movies about those times from our day. Code 1
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 113Soccer and identity: A Global History3.00
This course focuses on the social, cultural and political impact of soccer across the world. It tackles issues of racial, ethnic, class and geographic identities as well as gender dynamics through an examination of the development of soccer, and its iconic rivalries. It traces the history and development of the game in various parts of the world – Asia, Africa, North America, South America and Europe. Students engage in critical analysis of a range of sources: academic and popular non-fiction books; scholarly journal articles; newspaper and magazine articles; fan literature (blogs, fanzines, FB groups etc); and audio-visual materials (films, documentaries and matches). Students learn how to use these verifiable historical evidence to construct reasoned interpretations of the human past. In discussion sessions and other classroom activities, students are encouraged to explore how interpretations of the past can be applied to address contemporary issues and problems.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 115World Religions3.00
A course on the history or world religions, some great and some small: Abrahamic, Dharmic, Indigenous faiths and religions of the Tao. The course stresses links between faiths and their historic origins. All faiths are equally respected. It is NOT a debate about which faith is true or better than another. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 119Kings, Concubines, Thinkers, Farmers in East Asia3.00
China, Japan and Korea make up one of the fastest growing regions today. We buy all sorts of stuff made in China; text on our Samsung phones; drive our Hondas, Toyotas, and Hyundais; listen to K-pop; watch Jackie Chan and cheered on Yao Ming; read manga comics and watch anime; consume dim sum and chow mein, ramen and sushi, kimchi and bibimbop. This course seeks to understand what makes these societies tick; societies that share many similarities but are continually asserting their unique linguistic, cultural and political identities. We reach back to the pre-modern period to examine the lives of the elite (emperors, princes, generals, poets, philosophers) and everyday folks (soldiers and samurais, farmers, traders, monks, concubines). The course will use a diverse range of sources, from scholarly articles and memoirs to documentaries, movies and music videos. The course centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, presentations, critical thinking, as well as short- and medium-length essays. It introduces students to the study and discipline of history. Code 3
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 120Conquest and Resistance in Modern Asia3.00
This course examines the impact of one of the key dynamics of late modern history in Asia: colonialism. It takes a comparative look at how imperialism was experienced by the invading power and the colonized people in traditionally lesser-studied regions of the world. We look at a number of case studies of Western and Japanese colonialism from the 19th century onwards, including – (1) the Spanish and the US in the Philippines (2) the British experience in Asia (primarily India but also Burma); (3) the French in Vietnam; (4) The Dutch experience in Indonesia; and finally, (5) the Japanese in China, Taiwan, and Korea, and later during WWII, in Southeast Asia. (Other case studies may also be used.) We examine the social, economic, cultural, political, and personal impact of imperialism on both the metropole and the colony. We will read memoirs, watch music videos and films, and discuss issues such as the nuts and bolts of colonial rule, the role of women, attitudes towards race and identity, indigenous pursuit of modernity, and nationalism among others. Emphasis on learning to think globally and provides University Studies students and majors with an introduction to historical thinking. Code 3
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 125Modern Latin America3.00
An examination of issues of development and underdevelopment using Latin America as a case study. Students will explore a variety of theories of underdevelopment and use Latin American History to weigh the merits of these various theories. Code 2
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 130Early-Modern Europe/From Medieval to Early-Modern Europe3.00
An introductory course on the idea of Europe’s gradual emergence from the “Middle Ages” into the “Modern” era. Through focus on a few selected topics like peasants’ lives, the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, or the emergence of capitalism, students will gain familiarity with some of the key stories of the early-modern European past, while also developing skill in the basic methods and purposes of historical inquiry. Course activities will focus on close reading of historical documents, discussion, essay writing, and formal oral argument. Code 1
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 131Modern Europe 1789 to Present3.00
An introductory course on Europe's tumultuous "modern" era, from the French Revolution to the present. Focus on a few key topics, like the Liberal revolutions, industrialization, the World Wars, Nazism and totalitarianism, or the efforts to create a European Union, will allow students both to delve deeply into particular episodes of European history and at the same time to develop skill in the basic methods and purposes of historical inquiry. Course activities will focus on close readings of historical documents, discussion, essay writing, and formal oral argument. Code 1
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 151History of the United States Through 18773.00
Examination of a series of questions and controversies in United States history from the European conquest to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Explores issues such as the nature of the U.S. Constitution, immigration and industrialization, slavery and emancipation. Provides general education students and majors with an introduction to historical thinking.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 152The United States Since 18773.00
Examination of a series of questions and controversies in United States history from the late 19th Century through the present. Explores such issues as labor and social class, race and civil rights, gender and women's rights, the U.S. as global superpower, the Great Depression and social reform. Provides general education students and majors with an introduction to historical thinking.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 154African-American Voices3.00
Explores the African-American experience over the past two centuries with an emphasis on social and political discourse. The ideas of major political, literary, cultural and intellectual figures, as well as the content of black folk and popular culture, will be examined in a social and historical context. Authors include Douglass, DuBois, Hurston, Garvey, King, Malcolm X, and bell hooks. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 181The Muslim World3.00
Survey-level course introduces students to a variety of topics about the Muslim world from multidisciplinary perspectives. The time and life of the prophet Muhammad, the rise of great Islamic empires, Islam and women, the spread of Islam in America and the explosion of Islamic resurgence and extremism are all topics for consideration. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 189History Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
HIST 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
HIST 256Introduction to Historical Research and Writing-History of Wisconsin3.00
Introduction to basic methods of research and writing in the discipline of history using the History of Wisconsin as a subject matter. Required of all students majoring or minoring in History. Should ordinarily be taken in the sophomore year. Enrollment limited to students majoring or minoring in History or Social Studies, or by permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 264War and Peace in Bosnia3.00
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of various theories of the causes of conflict and conflict resolution within the specific historical context of the disintegration of Yugoslavia during the 1990s, and particularly the Bosnian was of 1992-95. Using those historical events and the questions they raise as a test-case, the course will try to come to some general conclusions about the nature and causes of ethnic conflict and how it differs from interstate conflict; the reasons for and methods of international intervention, including negotiation, arbitration, adjudication, and mediation; the factors that contribute to the success or failure of various methods of intervention and conflict resolution; the challenges involved in re-building societies after war; and the long-term prospects for fostering peace, security, justice, and human rights through such efforts. Code 1. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
HIST 266War and Peace in Northern Ireland3.00
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of various theories of the causes of conflict and conflict resolution within the general historical context of the rise and demise of the British Empire, and particularly the Northern Ireland question. Using those historical events and the questions they raise as a test-case, the course will try to come to some general conclusions about the nature and causes of ethnic conflict and how it differs from interstate conflict; the reasons for and methods of international intervention, including negotiation, arbitration, adjudication, and mediation; the factors that contribute to the success or failure of various methods of intervention and conflict resolution; the challenges involved in re-building societies after prolonged civil war; and the long-term prospects for fostering peace, security, justice, and human rights through such efforts. Code 1. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
HIST 289History Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the Social Inquiry faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different. (Regular ongoing topics: War and Peace in Bosnia.) Code will depend on the specific program.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 311The Working Class and the Dream of Equality in Europe3.00
Upper-division seminar in the history of radical egalitarian movements in the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing on Europe. Tracing the evolution of the idea of Equality from the French Revolution, Marxist socialism, Soviet communism, to the minority and student revolts of the 1960s, the course will seek to understand this history both as a radical intellectual critique of ordinary working people seeking immediate political and economic benefits. Emphasis will be communication their opinions in formal essays and debates. Code 1
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 314Nationalism and Nationalist Movements3.00
Upper-division seminar on the phenomenon of nationalism and its roles in the history of modern Europe and the modern world. One of the two main foci is on in-depth examination of key nationalist movements in European history like the Irish, German, and Servian. These case studies are paired with an examination of the evolution of Western social scientists; attempts to understand the nature of the phenomenon, from political-intellectual to sociological and anthropological perspectives. Primary emphasis will be placed on students' developing the ability to understand and use academic theories in explaining actual historical events. Code 1. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 317Men and Women in Nazi Germany3.00
In this upper-division examination of the nature of Nazi society and Fascism more generally, the central focus will be on gender--the images of and attitudes towards masculinity and femininity, and alternative sexualities, in the Third Reich. Changes in the role afforded to men and women, and in beliefs about what it means to be male and female, were at the very center of the revolutionary changes that constituted the shift to the "Modern Era." In seeking to understand Fascist attitudes toward gender, therefore, the course is seeking to understand not some peripheral aspect of Nazi society, but its very core, the very essence of modern democracy and its nemesis, Fascism. Much attention will be focused on developing skill in understanding and interpreting films and other visual artifacts and how they reveal ideals and assumptions about gender. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 317. Code 1. G.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 318The Holocaust in Modern Memory3.00
The Holocaust, which ended more than 70 years ago, has never been more present than it is today, exercising a hold on the imagination, especially in the United States and Western Europe, more powerful even than in the immediate aftermath of the war. But why should that be true? Why is it that the social memory of this particular event should have such power over generations so far removed in both time and space--particularly when other episodes of genocidal violence, similar in scale and historical importance--play almost no role in our collective memories and consciousness? This upper-division seminar focuses attention on those questions by examining the history of the memory of the Holocaust: how it is remembered; what is remembered and what is forgotten; how the memories are shaped; and to what uses they are put. Close readings of survivor memoirs and historical interpretations, and visual analyses of films and monuments will help students learn to critique the ways in which all "history" is socially constructed. Code 1. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 321The Sixties3.00
Examines the interlocking series of social and political crises that erupted in the United States in the 1960s. Topics include: civil rights and black power, urban unrest, the Vietnam War and the anti-war movement, the youth rebellion, the rebirth of feminism, and the conservative backlash. Studies the underlying causes of upheaval as well as the decade's legacy. The course emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of primary historical sources.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 322The Construction of Gender in the United States3.00
An examination of gender and sexual identities and roles in the United States from colonial times through the present. Explores the evolution of these roles and identities and the social, economic, and political forces that shape them. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 322. G.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 324First Nations Wisconsin History3.00
History of the native peoples of Wisconsin from prehistoric times to the present. Major emphasis on the six federally recognized tribes in Wisconsin. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 324.
HIST 330Envisioning World History3.00
An exploration of different approaches to the study of World History. Students will look at major issues and controversies in the field of World History and delve into these issues and controversies through an examination of concrete case studies. Normally taken in the junior year. Required for all students majoring or minoring in History.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 333The History of Indigenous Peoples3.00
A course on a global history of Indigenous Peoples which will explore the history of conquered and marginalized societies in a world systems context. The course examines their loss of economic resources, environmental security, cultural, linguistic and political sovereignty and their strategies for survival and reemergence as re-empowered peoples. Examples from many regions of the world with many films. Examples may change but the learning goals remain the same. Cross-listed as ANTH/FNS/HIST 333. Code 4. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
HIST 363Civil War and Reconstruction3.00
Examination of the American Civil War and its aftermath emphasizing social and political history. Organized around three main questions: Why did civil war erupt in the United States in 1861? What effect did the wartime experience have on American society? What was at stake in the struggles of the Reconstruction period?
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica (located in present-day Mexico, Guatemala, and neighboring areas), both past and present, and their transformations and influence across time and borders. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 2.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 369The Shadow Of Mexican Revolution3.00
Examines the revolution of 1910-1920 and its legacy with particular emphasis upon the ways in which the culture, politics, and society of twentieth-century Mexico evolved in the revolution's shadow. Particular attention is paid to the interrelated development of the state and the nation in modern Mexico. Includes significant attention to art and literature as historical sources. Code 4.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 385Samurai: A History of Japan3.00
This upper-division course traces the history of Japan through the development of the samurai as a distinct social group over the last millennium. We will focus on the formation of a distinctive Japanese culture and identity through its initial interaction with cultures inhabiting present-day Korea and China; its borrowing and adaptation of political, economic, social, linguistic, religious and educational elements from China and Korea; and the repeated opening and closing of Japan to the outside world over the course of several centuries. We will also look at Japan’s contact with the West, beginning with Dutch traders, the encounter with Commodore Perry’s US naval fleet of Black Ships, and the conflict with the Allies (principally the US) during WWII. We will examine these issues through the lens of samurai culture: exploring the myths and reality of samurais as warriors and bureaucrats, their professional and family lives, and their symbolic meaning within Japanese and popular culture; and so on. We will also consider whether this samurai/Japanese ethos is culturally and geographically specific, or transferable. This seminar-style course uses first person accounts; tales, fables and histories; scholarly articles; and films (not just the great Kurosawa epics, but also lesser-known accounts by Mizoguchi Kenji, Inagaki Hiroshi, Jim Jarmusch, Hirayama, Oshima, Yamada and others). Code 3
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 389History Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 393Women, Colonialism, and Nationalism in Modern Southeast Asia3.00
This upper-division seminar examines the role women played in Southeast Asian history from the 19th century till the present, specifically as the region confronted the challenges of colonialism and post-colonial nation-building. Among key issues covered are (1) the encounter between Western guns and local political systems; (2) race and racism (or, why the other group is always a barbarian); (3) how Southeast Asia became “modern”; (4) decolonization and/or revolution; (4) political, economic and religious challenges in post-colonial nationalism; (5) the intimate and everyday lives of Southeast Asians; and so on. We will work through these themes through the lens of the role of women and women’s groups, examining Western tourists, governesses and wives; sex, prostitution and the control of VD; colonial-era marriage with “white guys” and the biracial children; Islam and women; and post-colonial women political leaders. We will examine these issues within the framework of the political, social, economic and cultural interactions between Britain, France, Holland, the United States of America, China, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar/Burma. In addition to reading a selection of secondary and primary materials, including poems, biographies, memoirs, and histories, students will also watch music videos and films to understand and analyze the issues. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 393. Code 3. G.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 394Interrogating the Vietnam War: A History of Modern Vietnam (1885-1975)3.00
When we think of the Vietnam War, we think of a critical period in 20th century American history: the swinging 60s, napalm bombs, mysterious Viet Cong fighters, campus protests, the peace movement, and America’s defeat. We may even think of Tom Cruise in Born on the Fourth of July, or that famous picture of desperate people climbing up the ladder to a helicopter on the roof of the US embassy. But there is another side to the war: the “Vietnam” side. This course explores the conflict from that other side. To understand why the Vietnamese took up arms, we examine roughly a century of history beginning with the complete loss of independence to the French in the 1880s and ending with the reunification of the country in 1975. We explore why the Vietnamese resented the French, how young Vietnamese broke with their centuries-long traditions and radicalized, how women found opportunities in a new modernity, how Ho Chi Minh made several efforts to ally with America (and why the US said “No”), and how, ultimately, the US got drawn into a war it had little understanding of. Along the way, we will explore the changing nature of what it means to be Vietnamese on a personal, social and national level, as Vietnamese of different ethnic, class, gender and educational groups, from various geographic areas, confront new forces that re-shape their identities. We will read a mixture of primary and secondary materials, including films, memoirs, recollections, newspaper articles and autobiographies by Vietnamese participants. Code 3. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 395Modern India: From Gandhi to Slumdog Millionaire3.00
This course examines the impact of colonialism on the Indian subcontinent and on the formation of the modern India. We will also explore contemporary post-colonial themes such as the urbanization of India, the question of Indian-ness in the face of a growing and prosperous global Indian diaspora (or, why there is an Indian restaurant in just about any town in the US). This course is mainly conducted as a seminar in which students take the lead in presenting and discussing the material. The aim is not just to foster a higher level of critical reading, writing, thinking and speaking, but to also refine professional work habits. Code 3. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 489History Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 490Public History Internship3.00
A structured field experience. Students provide 150 hours of museum, archival, or other public history work to a local organization. Students receive training and experience under the supervision of a public history professional. Permission of a supervising faculty member required. See the History Program coordinator for information. No Code
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 495Special and Student Initiated Seminar1.00 - 3.00
This department offers a specially designed seminar or student-initiated seminar when interest warrants. In certain circumstances this course can be adapted to serve as the capstone experience. For further information see Special or Student-Initiated Seminar in the index of this catalog. Code will depend on topic selected.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 496Historiographical Research Theories and Methodologies3.00
Advanced seminar in current methodological and historiographical debates and trends in the historical profession. Introduces students both to the ways in which the writing of history has evolved and changed over time, and to the wide variety of theories and methods that dominate approaches to historical research and writing today. Through focused readings and discussions, students learn to recognize and critically evaluate the underlying assumptions, starting questions, methodologies and theoretical models at work in some of the most important historical debates of the past few decades. Individual historiographical research projects serve as the first step toward the students' primary research for their senior theses in HIST 497. Required of all History majors, and ordinarily taken in the fall of a student’s senior year.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 6 credits of History at the 300-level or above, or with instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 497Senior Thesis3.00
Guided research on a selected historical topic resulting in a thesis paper. Working closely with history faculty, students move beyond engagement with the existing secondary literature on their topic to conduct their own primary research and arrive at their own findings and argument. Individual work in cooperation with a faculty thesis advisor will be balanced with collaborative discussions among all students writing theses. The capstone will be a mini-conference in which each student presents her or his research findings to peers and guests.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HIST 496.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 498Study Abroad1.00 - 5.00
Field trips designed to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the instructor. With consent of the department chair and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Code depends on region visited.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 499Independent Study1.00 - 3.00
For advanced students majoring or minoring in History who have shown themselves capable of independent work. Each student is directed by a faculty member chosen by the student. Prerequisite: Approval of the department chair. Code will depend on topic selected.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand