2019-21 Undergraduate Catalog Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

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ACCT - Accounting
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ACCT 101Accounting for Nonbusiness Majors3.00
Introduction to the areas of financial accounting and managerial accounting. Basic financial statement preparation and analysis. Uses of accounting information by managers in the decision making process. Not open to students with majors in business. No Pass-Fail.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 189Accounting Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ACCT 200Financial Accounting3.00
Introduction to concepts of reporting financial information of sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations to interested parties. Includes discussion of cash, receivables, inventories, plant assets, intangible assets, current and long-term liabilities and investments. Cash flow information is also discussed.
Prerequisites:
BUS 101 (Applies to SBE students only)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ACCT 201Managerial Accounting3.00
Discusses basic concepts of costs in developing information for management use in decision making. Topics include CVP analysis, budgeting, cost allocations, and performance measurement.
Prerequisites:
ACCT 200 with a grade of C- or higher. BUS 101 (Applies to SBE students only)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ACCT 212Field Studies In Accounting1.00 - 3.00
Pass-Fail only. Provides presently enrolled freshmen and sophomores an opportunity to apply general accounting knowledge to selected accounting projects. Prerequisites: Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ACCT 288Independent Study in Accounting1.00 - 3.00
Pass-Fail only. Concentrated study of various accounting problems. Course may be repeated. Students can earn a maximum of 12 credits. Credits earned cannot be used to satisfy requirements for the accounting major. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ACCT 289Accounting Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ACCT 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by department faculty to give students direct experience in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ACCT 351Accounting for Not-For-Profit Entities3.00
Accounting theory and practice applicable to governmental units, hospitals, universities, and other not-for-profit organizations.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or (Jr. Status and Acct 101 or Acct 200, and Acct 201; or instructor permission)
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ACCT 352Intermediate Accounting I3.00
First in a two-course sequence providing in-depth study of accounting theory and practice. Topics include financial statements, present value techniques, current assets, current liabilities, long-term assets.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ACCT 353Intermediate Accounting II3.00
Continuation of ACCT 352. Includes long-term liabilities, stockholders' equity, earnings per share, deferred income taxes, pensions, leases, accounting changes, and the statement of cash flows.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and ACCT 352
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 355Cost Accounting3.00
In-depth study of concepts and techniques related to cost accumulation and reporting, cost control, and profit planning. Also covers the relationship of cost accounting to decision making.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ACCT 357Accounting Information Systems3.00
Examination of how accounting information of an organization is gathered, processed, stored, and distributed.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or (Jr. Status and Acct 101 or Acct 200, and Acct 201; or instructor permission)
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 359Topics in Accounting3.00
Examination of the accounting practices of complex revenue recognition issues, interest capitalization, asset retirement obligations, loan impairments, troubled debt restructuring, complex compensation issues, foreign currency transactions, derivative instruments, and hedging transactions.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or (Jr. Status and Acct 101 or Acct 200, and Acct 201; or instructor permission)
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 361Fundamentals of Taxation3.00
Comprehensive study of income tax concepts, regulations, and tax-planning principles as they relate to individuals and business.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or (Jr. Status and Acct 101 or Acct 200, and Acct 201; or instructor permission)
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ACCT 365Fraud Examination and Investigation3.00
A study of a variety of topics dealing with fraud and forensic accounting. Examines the nature of fraud, management fraud, fraud prevention, detection, investigation, and legal follow-up. Case studies and research methods are utilized.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or (Jr. Status and Acct 101 or Acct 200, and Acct 201; or instructor permission)
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 388Independent Study in Accounting1.00 - 9.00
Topics course. Concentrated study of Accounting Technologies, or International Accounting. Course may be repeated.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or (Jr. Status and Acct 101 or Acct 200, and Acct 201; or instructor permission)
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
ACCT 389Accounting Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ACCT 390Accounting with QuickBook3.00
This course is a concentrated study of QuickBooks. Students will use projects and case studies to learn how to set up companies, record business transactions, and compile financial reports.
Prerequisites:
Completion of Acct 200 and Acct 201, or instructor permission
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
ACCT 400Accounting Internship2.00 - 7.00
Pass-Fail only. Opportunity for students to earn academic credit by extending classroom learning to real-world settings. Students obtain the cooperation of an employer and prepare a learning contract. Course may be repeated. Students can earn a maximum of 14 credits.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and consent of coopering instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ACCT 412Field Studies in Accounting1.00 - 3.00
Provides non-traditional adult learners with some academic and/or broad business experiences and presently enrolled juniors and seniors an opportunity to apply general business knowledge to selected business projects. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and consent of coopering instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ACCT 461Business Taxation3.00
Taxation of corporations, partnerships, estates, trusts, and gift taxation.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or (Jr. Status and Acct 101 or Acct 200, and Acct 201; or instructor permission)
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 462Advanced Financial Accounting3.00
Applications of accounting theory to business combinations, partnerships, multinational companies, and other miscellaneous topics.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and Acct 352 and 353; or instructor permission.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 464Auditing Principles3.00
Introduction to professional auditing and the study of audit examinations which precede the attestation of the fairness of financial statements.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and Acct 352 and 353; or instructor permission.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ACCT 466Senior Project in Accounting2.00
Capstone course which integrates the various areas of accounting related to a business and includes a senior experience component.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and minimum of 18 credits from 300-400 level Acct courses.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ACCT 467Tax Research1.00
Introduction to the techniques required to research tax issues.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of ACCT 361 or ACCT 460.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ACCT 489Accounting Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
AIRS - Aerospace Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
AIRS 101Foundations of the U.S. Air Force1.00
Part one of two-part survey of the U.S. Air Force. Role of the military in U.S. society; military history; officership; professionalism; core values; career opportunities; customs/courtesies; communicative skills. AIRS 111 Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets, must be taken at the same time, and complements this course by providing followership experiences.
Prerequisites:
Corequisite for taking this course is AIRS 111.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 102Foundations of US Air Force1.00
Survey of the U.S. Air Force. Role of the military in U.S. society; military history; officership; professionalism; core values; career opportunities; customs/courtesies; communicative skills. AIRS 112 Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets, must be taken at the same time, and complements this course by providing followership experiences.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 112 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 111AFROTC GMC Leadership Laboratory0.00 - 1.00
Practical environment giving leadership training while being instructed on military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 101 is co-requisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 112AFROTC GMC Leadership Laboratory0.00 - 1.00
Practical environment giving leadership training while being instructed on military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 102 and AIRS 111 are corequisites for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 189Aerospace Studies Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
AIRS 201Evolution of the US Air Force Air and Space Power1.00
Air Force heritage; development/deployment of air power, a primary element of U.S. national security; leadership; ethics and values. Leadership development based on student participation in group problem solving. Oral/written communication development. AIRS 211 Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets, must be taken at the same time, and complements this course by providing followership experiences.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 211 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 202Evolution of the US Air Force Air and Space Power1.00
Air Force heritage; development/deployment of air power, a primary element of U.S. national security; leadership; ethics and values. Leadership development based on student participation in group problem solving. Oral and written communication development. AIRS 212 Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets, must be taken at the same time, and complements this course by providing followership experiences.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 212 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 211AFROTC GMC Leadership Laboratory0.00 - 1.00
Practical environment giving leadership training while being instructed on military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 201 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 212AFROTC GMC Leadership Laboratory0.00 - 1.00
Practical environment giving leadership training while being instructed on military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 202 and AIRS 211 are corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 289Aerospace Studies Elective0.60
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
AIRS 301Air Force Leadership Studies3.00
Comprehensive study of leadership/quality management fundamentals; professional knowledge; organizational doctrine and ethics; and communications skills required of today's Air Force officer. Leadership and management case studies.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 311 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 302Air Force Leadership Studies3.00
Comprehensive study of leadership/quality management fundamentals; professional knowledge; organizational doctrine; ethics; and communications skills required of today's Air Force officer. Case studies examine leadership/management situations as a means of exercising practical application of concepts being studied.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 312 and consent of instructor are prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 311AFROTC POC Leadership Laboratory1.00 - 2.00
Practical environment giving leadership training through teaching freshmen and sophomores military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 301 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 312AFROTC POC Leadership Laboratory1.00 - 2.00
Practical environment giving leadership training through teaching freshmen and sophomores military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 302 and AIRS 311 are corequisites for this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 389Aerospace Studies Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent ot a UW-Superior course.
AIRS 401National Security Affairs3.00
Advanced leadership development; national security processes, regional studies, doctrine, the military as a profession, civilian control of the military. Must take AIRS 411 Leadership Laboratory at the same time, providing advanced leadership experiences and the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 402Preparation for Active Duty3.00
Advanced leadership development; advanced leadership ethics, doctrine, the military as a profession, officership, military justice. Must take AIRS 412 Leadership Laboratory at the same time, providing advanced leadership experiences and the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 411AFROTC POC Leadership Laboratory1.00 - 2.00
Practical environment giving leadership training through teaching freshmen and sophomores military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Taken concurrently with AIRS 401.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 412AFROTC POC Leadership Laboratory1.00
Practical environment giving leadership training through teaching freshmen and sophomores military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Taken concurrently with AIRS 402.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 420Leadership Practicum1.00 - 4.00
Practical applicaton of leadership and management in structured realistic situations.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
AIRS 421Leadership Practicum1.00 - 4.00
Practical application of leadership and management in structured realistic situations.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
AIRS 489Aerospace Studies Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
ANTH - Anthropology
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ANTH 101The Human Experience3.00
Introduction to the principles, concepts and methods of cultural anthropology. Consideration of the ways in which cultural anthropology contributes to the understanding of human diversity.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ANTH 104The History of Human Origins3.00
A history of human origins from the fish who crawled out of the sea to early hominids to the peopling of the continents. Uses fossil, archaeological, experimental archaeological, linguistic, oral narrative and genetic evidence. Honors the origin narratives of diverse peoples. All religious views welcome. Many films. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST 104. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ANTH 175Superior Historic Archeology1.00
Students will learn about historic archaeological methodology by taking part in an archaeological excavation of the Old "Firehouse and Police Museum in Superior, WI. The goal of the course is to expose students to archaeological excavation methods and theory in conjunction with study of the historic archeology of Superior. Student findings will be kept on file with the Superior Public Museum.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ANTH 189Anthropology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ANTH 289Anthropology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ANTH 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the faculty.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ANTH 310Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective3.00
Examines the cultural construction of gender from an anthropological, cross-cultural perspective. Attention is paid to sociocultural factors such as kinship, colonialism, industrialism, and economic development which influence gender definitions, roles, and the structure of gender relations. Cross-listed as ANTH/GST 310.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ANTH 315Cultural Anthropology3.00
Detailed study of the human condition by focusing on a selection of specific cultures.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ANTH 320Environmental Anthropology3.00
Exploration of human-environment interactions across time, space, and diverse cultures. Considers environmental relations involving indigenous, non-Western, and Western groups. Readings address traditional environmental knowledge, changing patterns of subsistence, population, sustainability, urbanism, politics, debates over resources, and more.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ANTH 325Food, Culture and Society3.00
An examination of food's role and uses in distinct communities. Topics may include gender, the body, ethnicity, class, belonging, meaning, culture change, ideology, food movements, and food and inequality.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ANTH 333The History of Indigenous Peoples3.00
A course on a global history of Indigenous Peoples which will explore the history of conquered and marginalized societies in a world systems context. The course examines their loss of economic resources, environmental security, cultural, linguistic and political sovereignty and their strategies for survival and reemergence as re-empowered peoples. Examples from many regions of the world with many films. Examples may change but the learning goals remain the same. Cross-listed as ANTH/FNS/HIST 333. Code 4. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
ANTH 340Language, Culture, and Society3.00
The study of language and language use as essential elements of human culture, connected to thought, experience, identity, power, and social relations.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ANTH 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica (located in present-day Mexico, Guatemala, and neighboring areas), both past and present, and their transformations and influence across time and borders. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 2.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ANTH 389Anthropology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ANTH 489Anthropology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
ANTH 490Selected Topics in Anthropology3.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in Anthropology selected by the instructor. May be repeated once for credit when instructor and/or topics are different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ANTH 499Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Supervised independent study and/or research in Anthropology. Prior contract with instructor is required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
ART - Art
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ART 101Introduction to Art3.00
(For non-Art majors) Introduction to the field of Visual Art through a studio experience. Includes demonstrations, lectures and critiques planned to develop an appreciation of art as well as understanding media as a vehicle of expression.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 189Art Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ART 200Design Fundamentals3.00
Research examining the fundamental elements of visual arts design including: formal elements and their interactions, color theory, visual arts terminology, and analysis of content.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 202Professional Practices in Visual Arts3.00
Introduction to visual arts professional practices, including: scholarly research, image management and usage, discipline-specific writing, career exploration, portfolio presentation and the use of technology in support of all such practices. Basic computer literacy is expected for completing research and assignments.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 203Design Topics3.00
Provides a focused exploration of fine arts beyond core practices including: glass, stained glass, artists' books, non-static art, installation, and others.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 205Drawing 13.00
Beginning studies in drawing.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 209Digital Foundations for Visual Arts3.00
An introductory studio exploration of digital strategies, technology and applications, as applied to visual arts. Suitable for all students interested in working with digital images.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 210Painting 13.00
Introduction to the discipline of painting. Discussions and critiques supplement studio experiences.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art 200
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 211Collage 13.00
Introduction to the discipline of collage. Emphasis on creating unified visual statements with a variety of forms.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art 200
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 221Art History Survey:The Ancient World to the Renaissance4.00
A study of expression in art and architecture which contribute to the Western cultural tradition.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 222Art History Survey:Renaissance to Modern Art4.00
A continuation of ART 221 with emphasis on the changing role of art in Western culture.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 224Visual Arts in Non-Western Societies3.00
Study of visual arts in non-western societies including North American Indian/Native American; Mesoamerican; Oceania/Pacific Islands, Asian, and African cultures.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 240Printmaking 13.00
Introduction to printmaking as a fine art media.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art 200
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 241Photography 13.00
Designed to familiarize the student with the art of traditional 35mm film photography. Emphasis is on the fundamentals of camera operation, black-and-white film development and printing processes, practicing critical evaluation, and understanding the photographic aesthetic.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art 200
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 260Sculpture 13.00
Introduction to sculpture using multiple processes to explore technical and conceptual aspects of sculpture production.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art 200
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 270Ceramics 13.00
A beginning ceramics course that primarily explores traditional hand-building techniques. Students will also be introduced to basic clay materials, clay mixing, and glaze application.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art 200
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 275Metalwork 13.00
Basic processes, materials and tools in nonferrous metalwork.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art 200
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 279Fibers 13.00
Topic: Loom Weaving - Interlocking fibers via loom mechanisms; includes experience with fabric structures, fiber characteristics and the effective use of color. Topic: Off-Loom Fibers - Primary structures through a variety of manipulation techniques; may include primitive forms of weaving, felting, basketry and dyeing.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art 200
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 289Art Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ART 302Gallery Practices3.00
An introduction to the principles, theories, and practices of gallery operations and exhibition development. Prerequisite: ART 202 Professional Practices in Visual Arts
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art 202
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 305Drawing 23.00
Intermediate studies in drawing.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 205.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 310Painting 23.00
Intermediate studies in painting. Discussions and critiques supplement studio experience.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 210.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 311Collage 23.00
Intermediate studies of collage.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 211.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 320Studies in American Art3.00
American art of the Colonial, 19th or 20th Century period including sculpture, architecture and painting.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 323Medieval Art3.00
a) Early Christian and Byzantine; b) Medieval; c) Romanesque; d) Gothic: A detailed investigation of the art of the Middle Ages.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 325Renaissance Art3.00
Italian or Northern European architecture, sculpture and painting from 1250 to 1600.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 326Baroque Art to Romanticism3.00
The arts in Italy and Northern Europe between 1550 and 1850.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 327Modern Art4.00
Nineteenth Century, 20th Century, Contemporary or Post-Modern art and architecture and the forces which influenced the period.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite; Art 222
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 329Women In Art3.00
Women's expression in painting and sculpture, primarily of the 19th and 20th Centuries.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 331African and African Diaspora Art History3.00
A survey of art created by people of African descent. Also discussed are some influences of Islam, Western Europe, and the Caribbean regions.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 336Contemporary Movements in the Visual Arts3.00
Recent movements in painting, sculpture and architecture, with emphasis on the United States and Canada.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 340Printmaking 23.00
Intermediate studies in printmaking.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 240.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 341Photography 23.00
A sequential continuation of the introductory course emphasizing the exploration of concepts, practicing critical evaluation and dialogue, and standard museum/archival presentation of photographs. Students have the option of working in digital and/or film.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 241 or 101
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 342Photography History, Theory and Criticism3.00
Survey of the aesthetic and fundamental technical history of photography as a vital means of artistic expression and communication in North America and Western Europe from 1827 to 1940.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 350Psychology of Art3.00
Art as a fundamental human activity on an individual and societal level. Studies theories of creativity and issues of cultural and social diversity as applicable to art therapy.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: declared Art Therapy major and Junior or Senior status & ART 483
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ART 360Sculpture 23.00
Intermediate studies in sculpture.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisites: ART 260.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 370Ceramics 23.00
An Intermediate course emphasizing the fundamentals of wheel throwing, clay and glaze formulation, as well as loading and firing kilns. Introduction to historical and contemporary aesthetic issues within ceramics through problem-solving assignments.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 270.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 375Metalwork 23.00
Intermediate studies in nonferrous metalwork.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 275
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 379Fibers 23.00
Topic-Loom weaving - Interlocking fibers via loom mechanisms; includes experience with fabric structure, fiber characteristics and the effective use of color. Topic- Off-Loom Fibers - Primary structures through a variety of manipulation techniques; may include primitive forms of weaving, felting, basketry and dyeing.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 279.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 389Art Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Ssuperior course.
ART 402Art Therapy Seminar3.00
Investigation into topics of diagnosis and treatment in mental health. This course explores therapeutic methods that may be used for diverse disorders and clinical diagnoses. Current research will be discussed.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 483
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ART 404Issues in Visual Arts3.00
Advanced study of theoretical frameworks, concepts, contents, and contexts of visual arts. Topic will vary from: the spiritual and the sacred in art, psychology and philosophy of art, primitivism in contemporary/modern art, cultural politics in art, feminism in art, science and technology in art, among others.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 327
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 405Drawing: 33.00
Advanced studies in drawing.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 305.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 410Painting 33.00
Advanced studies exploring the theory and practice of painting. Discussions and critiques supplement studio experiences.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art 310
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 411Collage 33.00
Advanced studies exploring the theory and practice of mixed media approaches to drawing and painting.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 311
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 419Multi Modal Art Therapy3.00
An exploration of Multi-Modal healing techniques including Drama, Music, Poetry, and Play Therapy and their application in Art Therapy will be studied scholastically and experientially. Guest speakers on the topics presented as well as varied techniques as applicable to Art Therapy will be introduced.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: declared Art Therapy major and Junior or Senior status & ART 483
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ART 430Readings in Art History3.00
Guided individual research on an approved topic. Repeatable up to 12 credits. Instructor Consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 435Research in Art3.00
Topic: Art Education. Students plan and conduct an independent research project in art education. Research may be either basic or applied in nature. Results of the study will be reported in the style and form required for publication. Prerequisite: Minimum of 20 undergraduate credits in art and permission of the instructor. Topic: Art Therapy - Research into specific areas and elective topics in art therapy.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 440Printmaking 33.00
Advanced studies in printmaking.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 340.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 441Photography 33.00
Advanced studies in photography concerned with defining a specific direction with a body of work with an emphasis on concept resolution.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 341
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 445Expressive Arts For Change3.00
Experiential studio course exploring expressive arts process in depth through multiple arts media and techniques. Use the expressive arts as a tool for social change and personal transformation to contribute to positive change.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 483
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 460Sculpture 33.00
Advanced studies in sculpture.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 360
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 470Ceramics 33.00
An advanced course that critically examines ceramic processes and aesthetic issues through extended creative projects developed in consultation with the instructor. Emphasis on producing a professional, coherent portfolio and supporting visual artists' materials.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 370
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 475Metalwork 33.00
Advanced studies in nonferrous metalwork.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 375
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ART 479Fibers 33.00
Topic: Loom Weaving - Interlocking fibers via loom mechanisms; includes experience with fabric structure, fiber characteristics and the effective use of color. Topic: Off-Loom Fibers - Primary structures through a variety of manipulation techniques; may include primitive forms of weaving, felting, basketry and dyeing. Emphasis on expression.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: ART 379.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 483Art Therapy Fundamentals3.00
Survey of the origins, history, and theoretical objectives and trends in art therapy. Covers ethical, legal issues, and standards of good practice.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 484The Development of Creative Functioning3.00
Study of the creative individual; exploration of research related to creativity; techniques for promoting creative thinking and problem-solving in educational, clinical and business environments.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 485Art Therapy Techniques3.00
Theoretical approaches and techniques used in art therapy. Students learn to develop and apply art therapy assessments.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: declared Art Therapy major and Junior or Senior status & ART 483
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ART 489Art Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ART 491Visual Arts Capstone0.00
Required of all Visual Arts majors during their year of anticipated graduation. By participating in this course, each student's work will be publicly presented to the UW-Superior and greater UW-Superior community. Includes portfolio development and/or exhibition requirements. Must be taken Pass-Fail.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Art 302. Senior Standing required.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 495Advanced Art Studio1.00 - 12.00
Open only to advanced Art students who wish to pursue an individual art problem in any medium of their choosing. The student must take the responsibility of choosing a problem, outlining a plan of study to be submitted to the instructor at registration. The student works informally in co-operation with the instructor, who guides and evaluates in relation to the objective set forth.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 497Art Field Study1.00 - 3.00
By special arrangement with a department faculty member the student may enroll in an independent study project which may entail travel or the use of resources to be found in the immediate region. Documentation will be required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ART 498Practicum1.00 - 7.00
Supervised experience providing practical application in specific disciplines. Integration of the competencies of the individualized focus in contract form. Topics: Art Education, Art Therapy, Gallery.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
ARTED - Art Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ARTED 189Art Education Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ARTED 289Art Education Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ARTED 335Teaching Art in the Elementary Grades2.00 - 3.00
Provides a background in art education, children's artistic development, and program planning and evaluation in art for the elementary school child. Includes the development of lessons and units in art.
Prerequisites:
Junior Status & Admittance to Teacher Education program
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ARTED 339Teaching Art in Secondary Schools3.00
The development of discipline based art curricula, art media and instructional materials, teaching methods, and evaluation strategies for junior and senior high school art programs.
Prerequisites:
Junior Status & Admittance to Teacher Education program
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ARTED 389Art Education Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ARTED 481Art for Special Education3.00
Exploration of art concepts, media, and processes with adaptation for the mainstreamed student with special educational needs. A study of characteristics of students with behavior and/or learning disorders, cognitive delay, and physical handicap.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite:admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ARTED 482Art Education for the Gifted and Talented3.00
Study of current guidelines, trends, and program options that address the special educational needs of gifted and talented students. Areas of emphasis include: student characteristics, art work characteristics, identification procedures, and curriculum models.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Junior Status and Admission to the Teacher Education Program
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ARTED 489Art Education Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
BIOL - Biology
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
BIOL 111Plants and People4.00
Course designed to integrate the science of plants with a wide range of societal issues including genetically modified foods, medicines, invasive species, and rain gardens. Laboratory includes hands-on experiments in applied botany that utilize the University greenhouse. No prerequisite. Does not count towards the Biology major. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 115Human Biology4.00
University Studies course investigating the structure and function of the human body as related to areas of health and disease. Designed to meet the University Studies requirement for laboratory science. Does not count toward the Biology major. Not open to those having taken BIOL 270, or 280. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours).
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
BIOL 123Concepts In Biology4.00
Introduction for non-Biology majors to important biological concepts including chemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, plant and animal form and function, and ecology. Laboratory exercises are integrated with lectures and designed to be experimental and inquiry driven. Fulfills the University Studies requirement for laboratory science. Does not count toward the Biology major. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BIOL 130Principles of Biology I4.00
Introduction to important principles of chemistry, cellular, molecular, and evolutionary biology, and the diversity of life. Laboratory experiments are inquiry driven. Intended as the first of a two-course sequence for biology majors, and students with a strong interest in the life sciences. Fulfills the University Studies laboratory science requirement. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BIOL 132Principles of Biology II4.00
The second course in a two-course sequence intended for Biology majors or minors, and other students with a strong interest in the life sciences. Introduces students to the development, structure and function of both plants and animals and the basic principles of ecology. Laboratory exercises are integrated with lectures and designed to be experimental and inquiry driven. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours).
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of BIOL 130 or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BIOL 170Biological Inquiry for Teachers2.00
This course uses inquiry-based science methods to answer open-ended biological questions that have environmental connections. This course is required of Elementary Education majors and satisfies environmental science requirements for the Wisconsin Teaching Licensure and the UW-Superior University Studies program. Lecture one hour, laboratory two hours.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BIOL 181Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in biology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Instructor permission to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 189Biology Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BIOL 270Human Anatomy & Physiology I4.00
First semester of a two-semester sequence investigating the structure and function of human body systems and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within and across each system. Examination of tissues and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and sensory systems. . (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
BIOL 130 or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BIOL 280Human Anatomy & Physiology II4.00
Continuation of a two-semester sequence investigating the structure and function of human body systems and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within and across each system. Examination of the endocrine, digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
BIOL 270 or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BIOL 281Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in biology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Instructor permission to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 289Biology Elective1.00 - 50.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BIOL 300Marine Biology3.00
Introduction to the biology and ecology of marine plants and animals, coral reefs, the deep sea, rocky shores, marine mammals, fisheries, aquaculture, pollution, and the conservation of marine resources.(Lecture three hours).
Prerequisites:
BIOL 330 or 340 or Permission of Instructor
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 303Forest Ecology and Management4.00
Overview of major factors affecting forests, including disturbance, succession, wildlife, harvest systems, and ecosystem management. Emphasis on forests of the western Great Lakes region. Field trips develop identification and measurement skills and test ecological hypotheses. One weekend field trip. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 305Evolution3.00
A view of the scope, significance and mechanisms of evolutionary concepts in modern biology. (Lecture three hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BIOL 312Biogeography and Conservation3.00
Study of the geographical distribution of plants and animals across space and time. Topics include environmental causes of species range structure, species diversity, island biogeography, evolutionary diversification, and conservation biogeography. (Lecture three hours.) BIOL 340 or BIOL 305 recommended.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 315Plant Physiology4.00
Study of functions and physiological properties of plants, from the molecular scale up through ecosystem scale of biological organization. Main topics include water and nutrient transport, cell structure and function, nutrient relationships, photosynthesis, growth and development, and metabolism. Lab exercises emphasize experimental approaches using modern technology. (Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, and CHEM 106, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 316Medical Terminology2.00
Study of basic medical terminology. Prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, special endings, plural forms, abbreviations, and symbols are emphasized. A programmed learning, word-building systems approach is used to learn, construct, and analyze new terms as they relate to the function and location of body systems. No prerequisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BIOL 318Immunology3.00
Studying the relationship between cellular form and function to determine how macromolecules direct what a cell does. Current research techniques will be utilized to investigate how this dynamic interplay balances health versus disease. Critical processes such as proliferation, survival, and signaling pathways will be explored. (Lecture three hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or instructor permission
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BIOL 325Plant Taxonomy4.00
Provides the skills and background to identify flowering plants of northern Wisconsin and Minnesota. Lecture topics focus on floral structure, classification, and distribution of plant families of regional importance, while labs focus on identification of living plant materials using dichotomous keys. Each student will prepare a plant collection. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 330Genetics4.00
Integrating the principles and techniques of Mendelian and molecular genetics to emphasize how biological information is inherited and expressed. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
BIOL 132 and CHEM 105, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BIOL 335Aquatic Entomology3.00
Introduction to the identification and ecological relationships of freshwater insects and related invertebrates of the north central United States. (Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
BIOL 340Ecology4.00
Introduction to basic principles of ecology emphasizing interactions between organisms and their environment. Local ecosystems examined. CHEM 105 is recommended. (Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 132 or permission from the instructor
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BIOL 350Limnology4.00
Study of freshwater biology including the physical and chemical attributes of the environment as well as plants and animals found in lakes and streams. CHEM 105 is recommended. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
BIOL 355Microbiology4.00
Exploring how the structure, function and genetics of microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa) influence our everyday world. This includes microbes relevant to human health and industry; and the biological and chemical defenses we use to regulate them. The laboratory involves culture and identification techniques as well as modern applications of molecular biology. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 105 and either BIOL 330 or BIOL 340.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 360Parasitology4.00
The structure, habits, life cycles, classifications and identification of parasites and the diseases they cause. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 365Entomology4.00
The study of the anatomy, physiology, classification and identification of hexapods (insects). Includes a survey of hexapod orders, their economic and medical importance, and ecological topics. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 367Ornithology4.00
An introduction to the study of birds. General principles of classification, structure, distribution, migration, life histories, and habits are covered in lecture and text. Laboratory periods devoted largely to identification of birds in the field. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Biology 330 or 340 is required
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
BIOL 380Vertebrate Biology4.00
Life histories, habits, habitats, distribution, classification, and recognition of common vertebrates of the north central United States. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
BIOL 382Ichthyology4.00
An introduction to the classification, structure, physiology, distribution, and life histories of fishes. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
BIOL 330 or 340 or Permission of Instructor
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 389Biology Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer Credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalen to a UW-Superior course.
BIOL 399Cancer Biology3.00
Investigating the cellular, molecular and genetic origins of the human diseases classified together as cancer. Utilizing both scientific and popular literature, historical context will be provided and current research aimed at improving both diagnostic and therapeutic options will be explored. Topics include carcinogenesis, oncogenes, tumor suppressors, microenvironment influence, migration, invasion and metastasis.
Prerequisites:
BIOL 330 or permission of instructor
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 400Animal Physiology4.00
A study of normal and abnormal functions and vital processes of organ systems and how these processes are important to animals as they adapt to their environments.(Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 405Neurobiology3.00
Introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system, including neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and systems neurobiology. Topics include the properties of neurons, glia, and the mechanisms and organization underlying neural signaling; sensation and sensory processing; movement and its central control; and diseases and disorders of the nervous system. Discussions of neurobiological methods and reading of current neurobiological literature will be included.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of one course from each of the following bracketed groups: [PSYC 350 or BIOL 330] and [PSYC 275 or BIOL 330 or BIOL 340] or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
BIOL 420Field Biology1.00
Study of plants and animals in nature through field trips and observation. Topics change each semester. (Laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
BIOL 431Animal Behavior (Ethology)3.00
An introduction to animal behavior with special attention to behavioral mechanisms and the function of behavior. (Optional concurrent enrollment in BIOL 432.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 432Animal Behavior Laboratory1.00
Project-oriented course designed to explore the experimental aspects of animal behavior. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement for Biology major.
Prerequisites:
BIOL 431 is a corequisite for this class
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 440Cell Biology4.00
Study of the morphology, physiology and genetics of cells. Covers research techniques and modern application of molecular biology. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 and CHEM 106 or permission instructor
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BIOL 465Laboratory Techniques in Biochemistry and Cell/Molecular Biology2.00
Principles and practices of techniques used in biochemistry and in cell and molecular biology. Includes protein isolation and analysis, enzyme kinetics, carbohydrate analysis, immunological techniques for analysis, and techniques of gene cloning and manipulation. Recommended: CHEM 462, BIOL 355 AND BIOL 440 or concurrent enrollment. (Lecture one hour, laboratory three hours) Cross-listed as: BIOL/CHEM 465.
Prerequisites:
BIOL 330 and CHEM 360 are pre-requisites for this class
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 481Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in biology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Instructor permission to enroll in this course.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior standing or Instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 484Fish Population Ecology and Management4.00
Focuses on two important ecological questions regarding fish populations: 1) What factors cause changes in the size of fish populations? 2) What factors influence the total number of species found in a particular environment? These questions are addressed by investigating how individual fish allocate time and resources in response to environmental conditions, and how different allocation schemes influence individual fitness. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement for Biology major. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or 340, MATH 102 or MATH 113 or equivalent are prerequisites
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 489Biology Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BIOL 491Research in Biology1.00 - 4.00
A course developed in cooperation with faculty or area research laboratories designed to provide students with practical experience in experimental biology. Candidates for this course must outline a research problem and complete a Contract for Independent Learning prior to registration. (May be repeated for a total of four credits.) Instructor consent required. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement for Biology major.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
BIOL 492Biology Seminar1.00
Study of a topic through literature research. Student studies a topic and effectively summarizes the available information in written and oral form. Presentation techniques are emphasized. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement for Biology major.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BIOL 496Internship1.00 - 4.00
On-the-job experience with local agencies (e.g. Wisconsin DNR) that provides students with opportunities to apply their skills to practical problems. In collaboration with a faculty sponsor, students must complete a Contract for Independent Learning prior to registration. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
BIOL 497Senior Year Experience1.00
This course provides instruction to develop and deliver an oral presentation in a scientific conference format to serve as a culminating experience for the Biology major. Presentation topics are connected to a capstone project completed in BIOL 491 Research in Biology or BIOL 496 Internship, either of which must be taken as a pre-requisite or co-requisite course. Meets in face-to-face format 2 hours per week.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
 
BUS - Business
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
BUS 101Introduction to Business3.00
This course serves as an introduction to the different majors offered by the School of Business and Economics. The course provides insights into the foundation business knowledge and skills that will be useful for students pursing a professional career in business. Topics include: a survey of management, finance, distribution, production, risk, business law, and other business activities; integrated business simulation, personal finance, business ethics, business computer applications, professional business communication, business career preparation, team-building, as well as good learning habits.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 189Business Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BUS 211Business Law I3.00
Legal principles relating to business transactions. Includes the legal and social environment of business, contracts, choice of business entities, and selected elements of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 212Field Studies in Business1.00 - 3.00
Provides non-traditional adult learners with limited business experience and presently enrolled freshmen and sophomores opportunity to apply general business knowledge to selected business projects. Pass-Fail only. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 270Business Statistics3.00
Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to business situations. Includes tabular, graphical and numerical summary measures; probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; hypothesis testing; analysis of variance; and regression/correlation analysis.
Prerequisites:
BUS 101 (Applies to SBE students only)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 288Independent Study In Business1.00 - 3.00
Concentrated study of various business problems. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 289Business Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BUS 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 306Management Science3.00
Application of basic quantitative and qualitative techniques for problem solving in production/operations management. Includes linear programming, transportation and network models, inventory models, queuing models, project management, forecasting and decision theory.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or non-SBE majors are required to be at Junior status (obtain drop/add form from a SBE-authorized representative, Erlanson Hall, Room 301).
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 340Hospitality Management3.00
Exploration of the major components and organization structure of the hospitality industry. Presents historical development, opportunities and current trends. Stresses the importance and relationships of education and work experience to career success. Examination of the key components in various industry sectors, including food service, lodging, gaming and property management.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BUS 341Event Management3.00
Planning, organizing and the management of events will be investigated for the hospitality, tourism and sports industries. Emphasis is placed on the design, internal management systems and post event evaluation.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
BUS 363Business Ethics and Social Responsibility3.00
Explores moral and ethical theories such as ethical fundamentalism. Theories are then applied to "real world" situations in the United States and around the globe. Covers classic cases in business ethics, current cases and trends such as Sarbanes-Oxley and the social responsibility of business. Especially useful for students studying management, finance, marketing, accounting, and international business.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or non-SBE majors are required to be at Junior status (obtain drop/add form from a SBE-authorized representative, Erlanson Hall, Room 301).
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BUS 370Principles Of Marketing3.00
Introduction to terms, definitions and concepts integral to the strategic planning and decision-making involving the components of the marketing mix: product, price, promotion, and physical distribution. Emphasis on market analysis, delivering value and establishing competitive advantage. Coverage of current trends in marketing.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or (Jr. status and Acct 101, Econ 235, Bus 211, and Bus 270; or instructor permission)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 371Consumer Behavior3.00
Application of concepts from the disciplines of psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics that affect purchase decisions of individuals. Current literature in consumer psychology is explored in its relation to marketing strategy.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BUS 373Advertising & Promotion3.00
Introduction to advertising management, research, planning, and the creative process. Topics covered include market segmentation and targeting, account planning, working with clients, advertising research, advertising strategy, developing art and copy, media selection and budgeting (print, broadcast, social media) plus integrating advertising in the marketing mix.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370 or COMM 170, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BUS 375Public Relations3.00
Introduction to principles, theories and skills of public relations, including a study of its problems, impact and potential.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370 or COMM 170, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BUS 377Hospitality, Tourism & Travel Marketing3.00
Principles of marketing for the hospitality, tourism and travel industries. Covers marketing strategies & tactics for hotels, restaurants, tourist attractions, convention & visitor bureaus, tour operators & related products & services. Topics include the unique characteristics of travel & tourism, consumer behavior, market segmentation, product development, internal marketing, pricing, yield management, sales channels, & marketing communications. The vacation, personal travel & business travel market segments are examined.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the SBE Department or Instructor Consent are prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 380Principles Of Management3.00
Introduction to the basic tools and requisite knowledge associated with businesses and their management as well as the broad concepts associated with the challenges of managing within organizations. Examines various management functions, and gains in-depth understanding of the working and behavioral complexities that arise in organizations.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or (Jr. status and Acct 101, Econ 235, Bus 211, and Bus 270; or instructor permission)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 382Human Resource Management3.00
Examines current theoretical and research developments related to human resource management and human resource practices as they relate to the planning, recruitment, selection, training, and management of the human resources within an organization.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or non-SBE majors are required to be at Junior status (obtain drop/add form from a SBE-authorized representative, Erlanson Hall, Room 301).
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BUS 389Business Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BUS 400Business Internship2.00 - 7.00
Opportunity for students to earn academic credit by extending classroom learning to area business settings. Students obtain the cooperation of an employer and prepare a learning contract. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE, consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
BUS 405Entrepreneurship3.00
Study of entrepreneurship with an emphasis on small business. Topics include business plan preparation, forms of organization, financing options and management problem solving.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BUS 411Advanced Business Law3.00
Selected topics in business law, including international business law, obligations of corporate directors and officers, franchises, negotiable instruments, creditor’s rights and remedies, secured transactions, bankruptcy law, mortgages and foreclosures, and wills and trusts.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 211 or consent of instructor. Non-SBE majors are required to be at Junior status (obtain a Drop/Add form from a SBE-authorized representative, Erlanson Hall, Room 301).
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
BUS 412Field Studies in Business1.00 - 3.00
Provides non-traditional adult learners with limited business experience and presently enrolled freshmen and sophomores opportunity to apply general business knowledge to selected business projects. Pass-Fail only. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the SBE Department or Instructor Consent are prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 430International Business3.00
The course covers international activities of small and medium-sized firms as well as large multinational corporations. Topics include trade strategies, doing business with newly emerging market economies and the functional areas of international business management. Emphasis on the importance of cross-cultural communication.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or non SBE majors: junior status (obtain drop/add from SBE authorized representative, Erlanson Hall 301).
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 474Retail Marketing3.00
Principles of establishing and operating a retail business. Topics include retail market analysis and research, store layout, atmospherics, merchandising, pricing, sales, advertising, promotion, inventory management, and examination of current trends. Emphasis on retail strategy and the evolution of shopping culture.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BUS 475Professional Selling and Sales Management3.00
Study of the theories and applications of professional selling and sales management. Development of persuasive communications strategies for specific applications. Emphasis on organizational and presentation skills to provide students with opportunities for practical sales experience.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
BUS 477Digital Marketing3.00
Classroom and field experience integrating internet marketing concepts with traditional marketing activities. Internet marketing and social media supporting marketing communication strategies. Student interaction with regional and community business enterprises. Emphasis on practical application.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370 or COMM 170, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BUS 482Marketing Research3.00
Designed to help students become intelligent users of marketing research information. Introduction to the variety of qualitative and quantitative methods available to assist marketing managers in decision-making. Explores alternative methods available to collect and analyze data.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BUS 483Organization Behavior and Development3.00
Advanced study of organizations, the impact of human factors and management principles, and organization development is used to direct and manage change. Course is designed to build one's understanding of the theories and concepts for managing human behavior in organizations. Focus on case analysis and class exercises. Prerequisites: BUS 380.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE & BUS 380
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BUS 484Marketing Strategy and Brand Management3.00
Designed to assist students in applying knowledge and analytical skills in comprehensive marketing strategy development. Integration of decisions regarding all dimensions of the marketplace offering. Analysis of challenges facing marketing managers. Emphasis on utilizing a structured planning process to achieve marketing goals.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BUS 488Independent Study1.00 - 3.00
Concentrated study of various business problems.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE, consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BUS 489Business Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BUS 495Strategic Management (Capstone)3.00
Integrative approach to the formulation and implementation of strategy within business or administrative type organizations. Capstone course drawing on the functional analytical tools, managerial concepts and techniques developed in previous business administration and economics courses and includes a senior experience component.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE; BUS 370, BUS 380, and FIN 320.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BUS 499Seminar in Business1.00 - 4.00
Studies of recent trends and practices in business and business education.
Prerequisites:
Junior-level status.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
CHEM - Chemistry
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
CHEM 100Our Chemical Environment2.00
Introduces the concepts of chemistry into the interpretation of chemical effects on the environment. Prerequisite: None. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science (environmental component). Credits cannot be counted toward a Chemistry major or minor. Offered both on campus and online.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHEM 101Elements & The Environment3.00
Introduction to basic concepts of chemistry and their importance in gaining a better understanding and appreciation of our environment. Many topics of current environmental concern will be discussed. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science (environmental component). Credits cannot be counted toward a chemistry major or minor. Students cannot earn credit for both CHEM 100 and 101.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 102Chemistry of Everyday Phenomena4.00
Explores the chemistry of foods, drugs, household chemicals, personal hygiene products, agricultural chemicals, materials and other types of chemistry relevant to the student. Current chemistry topics in the popular press will be critically examined. Topics not usually addressed in other science general education courses will be presented. A small part of the course will be devoted to elementary statistics (evaluation, not calculation) to enable students to understand science and medicine as it is commonly reported. An important but minor part of the course involves discussion of the role of research in technology development and standard of living, and the impact of the chemical industry on the national and world economies. Credits cannot be counted toward a Chemistry major or minor. Prerequisite: None. (Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 103Principles of General Chemistry3.00
This course exposes the students to the main principles of modern chemistry and its applications, as needed for the following Sustainable Management courses: SMFT-315 "Global Environmental Chemistry" and SMGT-320 "Energy for Sustainable Management". Each student is expected to develop a working knowledge of the topics covered in the Power-Point presentations and the textbook, to demonstrate some ability to work independently, and to be able to solve the problems assigned for the homework and comparable exercises.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 102 with a grade of C- or better is prerequisite for taking this class.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 105General Chemistry I5.00
Introduction to physical and chemical properties of the elements, chemical reactions, gas laws, chemical nomenclature, structure of atoms, chemical bonding, and solutions. Intermediate algebra (MATH 113) or equivalent strongly recommended as prerequisite. (Four lectures and one three-hour laboratory.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 106General Chemistry II4.00
Continuation of CHEM 105 studying chemical equilibria, kinetics, electrochemistry, chemical compounds and reactions, qualitative analysis of ions, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory.
Prerequisites:
CHEM 105 and one of MATH 113, 115, 151 or 240.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CHEM 107Supplementary Problems in General Chemistry II1.00
A course designed to expand and provide extra help on those topics in General Chemistry II which frequently cause difficulty for the less well prepared student. Can only be taken simultaneously with General Chemistry II (CHEM 106). Credits cannot be applied to Chemistry Major or Minor. One Lecture-recitation per week.
Prerequisites:
CHEM 106 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CHEM 181Introductory Topics1.00 - 2.00
Introductory studies of special interest selected by a student and/or faculty member. The course may be independent-study, and it may be either lecture, laboratory, or both. The study most commonly will be introductory laboratory research work by a student considering a chemistry major, but also may be used for other special studies by a highly prepared student in chemistry. Pre- or corequisite: varies with topic and permission of instructor. Individual sections of the course may be offered for a grade or may be offered pass-fail only. May be repeated for a maximum of two credits. Offered upon sufficient demand.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 189Chemistry Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CHEM 205Quant Analysis Lecture3.00
Introductory lecture course in quantitative chemical analysis with major emphasis on classical, wet chemical methods and chemical equilibria. Topics include: concentration calculations, chemical reaction stoichiometry, equivalent weights and normality, titrimetric and gravimetric determinations, acid-base theory, solubilities and precipitation separations, basic electrochemistry, potentiometry, introduction to uv-visible absorbance spectrophotometry. (Three lectures.)
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of CHEM 106, and corequisite is CHEM 206.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 206Quantitative Analysis Laboratory2.00
Introductory laboratory course emphasizing wet chemical methods of quantitative analysis. Representative experiments include titrimetry and basic instrumental determinations. Applications of statistics to data analysis are discussed and applied. (One four-hour lecture/laboratory.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 205 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 281Selected Topics1.00
Individual studies of a special interest selected by a student and/or faculty member. The study may involve seminars, special laboratory study. Prerequisites: varies with topic and consent of instructor. (May be repeated for up to two credits.) Offered on sufficient demand.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 289Chemistry Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CHEM 300Chemistry Of Natural Waters3.00
Emphasizes experimental methods used in investigations of the chemistry of natural water systems and the interpretation of chemical parameters indicative of water quality. Does not count toward chemistry major. (Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 106 is a pre-requisite for this class
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
CHEM 312Organic Chemistry--A Short Course3.00
One-semester survey in organic chemistry covering material which describes the structure, properties, preparation and reactions of the major classes of organic compounds. Additional topics will be selected from chemical bonding, kinetics, mechanisms and spectroscopy. Does not count toward a chemistry liberal education major. Counts toward a chemistry secondary education major. (Three lectures.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 106 is prerequisite and CHEM 313 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 313Intro Organic Chem Lab2.00
One-semester laboratory designed to accompany CHEM 312. Work consists of laboratory preparation and study of the chemical and physical properties of compounds of the types covered in CHEM 312. Co-requisite: CHEM 312. Does not count toward chemistry liberal arts major. Counts toward a chemistry secondary education major. (One-hour lecture-demonstration and one three-hour laboratory.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 312 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 320Organic Chemistry Lecture I3.00
First of a two-semester sequence of courses which make up a standard one-year course in beginning organic chemistry. Study of the structures, properties, preparation and reactions of the major classes of organic compounds. Also includes basic principles of chemical bonding, kinetics, mechanisms and molecular spectroscopy. (Three lectures.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 106 is prerequisite; CHEM 322 AND CHEM 327 are co-requisites.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 321Organic Chem Lecture II3.00
Second of a two-semester sequence of courses which make up a standard one-year course in beginning organic chemistry. Work is made up of the study of the structures, properties, preparation and reactions of the major classes of organic compounds. Also includes basic principles of chemical bonding, kinetics, mechanisms and molecular spectroscopy. (Three lectures.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 320 is prerequisite; CHEM 323 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CHEM 322Organic Chemistry Lab I1.00
First of a two-semester sequence of laboratory courses which accompany CHEM 320 and 321. Consists of laboratory preparation and study of the chemical and physical properties of compounds of the types covered in CHEM 320-321. Some applications of molecular spectroscopy. (Three-hour laboratory)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 320 AND CHEM 327 are co-requisites.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 323Organic Chemistry Lab II1.00
Second of a two-semester sequence of laboratory courses which accompany CHEM 320 and 321. Consists of laboratory preparation and study of the chemical and physical properties of compounds of the types covered in CHEM 320-321. Some applications of molecular spectroscopy. (Three-hour laboratory.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 321 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CHEM 327Molecular Spectroscopy I1.00
Elementary introduction to the spectroscopic techniques most frequently used by chemists. Brief summaries of the mechanics of the techniques will be given, but major focus is interpretation of spectra generated by the following techniques: mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Students will be expected to identify and sketch structures of simple organic compounds based on spectral interpretation. (One lecture.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 320 is a corequisite for this class
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 345Physical Chemistry Lect I4.00
Exposes students to the main principles of modern thermodynamics and chemical kinetics and their applications. Key points of both areas will be illustrated with the examples of thermodynamics of polymer blends and the effect of formation of meta-stable states in polymer thin films. (Four lectures.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 106, MATH 241, PHYS 202 or PHYS 206, OR permission of instructor are prerequisites.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 346Physical Chemistry Lecture II3.00
Continuation of CHEM 345 emphasizing quantum theory, lasers, spectroscopy, molecular transport, and molecular reaction dynamics. Key points of many of these areas will be illustrated with the phenomenon of surface light-induced drift. (Three lectures.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 345 or permission of instructor. CHEM 348 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
CHEM 347Physical Chemistry Lab I1.00
Laboratory work studies laser photochemistry and other applications of lasers in chemistry, as well as thermodynamical properties of gases and liquids, and calorimetry. (One four-hour laboratory meeting during the last eight weeks of the semester.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 345 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 348Physical Chemistry Lab II2.00
Continuation of CHEM 347 consisting of laboratory studies of the applications of lasers in chemistry, including kinetic measurements, thermodynamical properties of liquids and macromolecules, electrochemistry, and spectroscopy. (One four-hour laboratory.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 346 is a co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
CHEM 360Introduction to Biochemistry3.00
One-semester survey of principles of biological chemistry. Study of the principal compounds of biochemical importance: proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, their chemistry, metabolic breakdown and biosysthesis, enzymes, co-factors, nucleic acids, regulation of cellular systems. Three lectures.
Prerequisites:
CHEM 312 or CHEM 321 are prerequisite.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 365Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry3.00
Survey of the basic chemistry of most elements of the periodic table, including natural abundances, typical compounds in the natural state, purification techniques, and modern uses. Periodic trends will be explored and used as an organizing tool in understanding this chemistry. Includes topics such as crystal packing and ionic structures of solids, acid-base theory, and redox reactions.
Prerequisites:
CHEM 106 and CHEM 312 or CHEM 320.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
CHEM 375Instrumental Analysis Lecture3.00
Survey of chemical instrumentation and instrumental methods of analysis. Instrumental methods discussed include: atomic and molecular spectroscopy and spectrometry, chromatography, potentiometry, and voltammetry. Discussion also includes: detection limits and detectability, sensitivity, and methods of data analysis. (Three lectures.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 205 is prerequisite. CHEM 376 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
CHEM 376Instrumental Analysis Lab2.00
Representative experiments in many of the analytical methods discussed in CHEM 375. Some experiments involve digital data acquisition. Computerized methods of data analysis are employed. (One four-hour laboratory.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 375 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
CHEM 381Intermediate Topics1.00 - 3.00
May be offered for individualized or multiple-student instruction on a particular topic. May be independent study, lecture or laboratory. Topic(s) selected based upon student interest with approval of instructor. Prerequisites: varies with topic. Introductory Physical Chemistry is currently offered as an Intermediate Topic on a regular basis.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
CHEM 389Chemistry Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CHEM 462Advanced Biochemistry3.00
Second semester of a year sequence involving a study of the chemistry of living systems. Takes a more in-depth look at principles covered in the first semester: structure and properties of amino acids and proteins, enzymes, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and nucleic acids, and covers additional topics including enzyme mechanisms, vitamins and co-factors, protein metabolism and bioenergetics.
Prerequisites:
CHEM 321 and CHEM 360 are prerequisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
CHEM 465Laboratory Techniques in Biochemistry and Cell/Molecular Biology2.00
Principles and practices of techniques used in biochemistry and in cell and molecular biology. Includes protein isolation and analysis, enzyme kinetics, carbohydrate analysis, immunological techniques for analysis, and techniques of gene cloning and manipulation. Recommended: CHEM 462, BIOL 355 AND BIOL 440 or concurrent enrollment. (Lecture one hour, laboratory three hours) Cross-listed as: BIOL/CHEM 465.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
CHEM 481Special Topics1.00 - 6.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in chemistry selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study. May be repeated when topics are different. Prerequisite: varies with topic.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 489Chemistry Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CHEM 491Senior Research1.00 - 4.00
Individual laboratory investigation of a selected problem to include a study of the related literature and formal reports. Prerequisites: CHEM 346 and approval of instructor. (May be repeated for up to four credits.)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHEM 496Senior Paper1.00
Preparation of a formal paper on an advanced chemistry topic. Topic must be approved by instructor. Instructor consent required. Topic chosen for CHEM 496 may not be appropriate for CHEM 497. Consult instructor of CHEM 497. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 345.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHEM 497Senior Seminar In Chemistry1.00
Each student prepares and gives one or more oral reports on a chemical topic of interest to the student and approved by instructor. Prerequisites: CHEM 345 or senior standing in Chemistry. One lecture-discussion. Does not count toward 400-level credits for ACS certification.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHEM 498Internship1.00 - 4.00
A chemistry-related work experience with an industry, business or other organization (e.g. LSRI, LSNERR) that provides students with opportunities to apply their learned skills to practical problems. In collaboration with a faculty sponsor, students must complete a Contract for Independent Learning prior to registration. May be used to satisfy Senior Year Experience requirements.
Prerequisites:
Pre-requisite: CHEM 205 and CHEM 321
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
CJUS - Criminal Justice
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
CJUS 106Crime, Behavior and Social Control3.00
Multidisciplinary analysis of individual, community and government responses to harmful conduct; an examination of criminal, juvenile, military, and civil justice as well as informal and personal control systems; an inquiry into the use of coercion to promote conformity or lessen injurious behavior; special attention given to decisions, processes and institutions which respond to acts of criminality and delinquency.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CJUS 160Field Exp./Cert Prog CJUS1.00 - 3.00
An academically grounded, structured professional experience in a justice setting. Students seeking credit should consult with the director of the Criminal Justice program for application guidelines. Written approval of the instructor must be obtained before registering. Since the field experience is an introductory, independent learning experience involving the cooperation and assistance of outside agencies, a student should notify the instructor in writing of an interest in enrolling in the course several months before the semester of the actual field experience. Instructor consent required. Formal arrangements with an agency may be easier to complete with careful, early planning.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CJUS 189Criminal Justice Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CJUS 207Police and Society3.00
Broad survey of the role of the police in American society. Special attention given to the origins of policing, the nature of police organizations and police work, and problems and issues in the relationship between police agencies and the community.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CJUS 212Criminal Investigations3.00
Problems of directing and controlling criminal investigation; survey of the fundamentals of investigation, crime scene search and recording, collection and preservation of evidence, scientific investigation, crime analysis, information sources, interview and interrogation, and case monitoring and preparation.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CJUS 289Criminal Justice Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CJUS 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation, otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements, consult your advisor. May be repeated only if content is different.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CJUS 312Gender,Crime,and Justice3.00
Exploration of the social construction of gender in crime and delinquency as well as in justice systems; analysis of how assumptions about female and male natures, as well as appropriate roles and positions in society affect the interpretation and application of law; comparison of women/girls and men/boys as offenders, victims and practitioners. Cross-listed as CJUS/GST 312.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CJUS 316Crime, Corrections and Punishment3.00
Survey of philosophical, historical, sociological, psychological and political aspects of the American prison and related programs in the criminal justice system; problems of inmate culture, control, supervision and treatment are emphasized through analysis of penal institutions and treatment/release programs. Attention is given to examining incarceration through the "eyes" of inmates. The course may be taught from an academic service learning perspective, involving field experiences in custodial settings.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CJUS 318Community Corrections3.00
Analysis of theories and practice of probation and parole, responses of paroling authorities to public pressures and court controls and their implications for rehabilitative efforts; analysis of feasibility and effectiveness of treatment of individuals under sentence in the community.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CJUS 320Special Topics3.00
Selected topics in the administration of justice. May be repeated when the content of the special topic is substantially different from previous course presentations. See course instructor to review content. Previous topics: Military Justice; Terrorism: Meaning and Justice; Masculinities and Crime; Restorative Justice. As needed.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CJUS 374Research Methods in Criminal Justice3.00
Introduction to the research methods applied in criminology and criminal justice. Includes an examination of the scientific method, quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods approaches.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CJUS 389Criminal Justice Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CJUS 448Criminology3.00
Multidisciplinary analysis of criminal behavior. Special attention devoted to the definition, nature and scope of crime in the United States and the explanations which evolved to account for this form of deviant behavior. Includes historical analysis of criminological thought and strategies of social control.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CJUS 463Delinquency and Juvenile Justice3.00
Examination of the social and psychological dimensions of juvenile delinquency: its nature, extent, distribution and patterns; evaluation of theories and explanations of delinquent causation; consideration of the legal processing of delinquents; programs of prevention and treatment of delinquents. Satisfies the requirement of general education as an independent learning and a capstone experience. Students completing CJUS 463 as a senior capstone experience will be required to give a public presentation on their work. See director of the Criminal Justice Program and/or coordinator in Legal Studies program for more information.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CJUS 489Criminal Justice Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CJUS 491Applied Criminal Justice3.00
Academic and professional development in justice settings as well as course meetings. A field experience in criminal justice that applies scholarly research to understanding justice agencies and organizations. Students discern policies and practices of justice organizations through systematic observations at agency sites as well as frequent, regularly scheduled course meetings with the course instructor. The workings of agencies and agents will be measured through analytical and reflective writing exercises. Written consent of the instructor must be obtained before registering. Since a significant part of the course is an independent learning experience involving the cooperation and assistance of outside agencies, a student should notify the instructor in writing of an interest in enrolling in the course early in the semester before the semester of the actual field experience. Instructor consent required. Formal arrangements with an agency may be easier to complete with careful, early planning. Students completing CJUS 491 as a senior capstone experience will be required to give a public presentation on their work. See director of the Criminal Justice Program and/or Coordinator in Legal Studies program for more information.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
CJUS 492Criminal Justice Policy Issues and Reform3.00
Group designed research based on approved proposal of a significant and focused public policy topic. Generating a coherent researchable idea, reviewing a literature, collecting and analyzing information/data and reporting results. Satisfies the requirement of general education as an independent learning and a capstone experience. Students completing CJUS 492 as a senior capstone experience will be required to give a public presentation on their work. See director of the Criminal Justice Program and/or coordinator in Legal Studies program for more information.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of both CJUS 374 and either MATH 130 or PSYC 301.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CJUS 497Student Initiated Seminar1.00 - 3.00
The program offers a specially designed seminar or student-initiated seminar when there is sufficient interest. For further information, see the Criminal Justice Program director.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CJUS 498Senior Capstone Presentation0.00
Required culminating senior-year public presentation, based on CJUS 463 (Delinquency and Juvenile Justice), CJUS 491 (Applied Criminal Justice), CJUS 492 (Senior Thesis), or CJUS 499 (Individualized Research). See UW-Superior catalog for Criminal Justice capstone course descriptions. The presentation will be given at a specified time in the relevant fall or spring semester prior to graduation. It may be made in one of several ways, including an oral presentation, a poster, digital video, and theatrical or other performance. Pass-Fail. Arranged. Advisor permission required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CJUS 499Individualized Research1.00 - 3.00
Either supervised research in selected subfields of the discipline resulting in the submission of a formal research paper, or development and execution of a project designed to apply criminal justice or social science concepts and skills to a particular situation, drawing upon the relevant scholarly literature and resulting in submission of a formal research and experience-evaluation paper. Projects devoted to the demonstration of skills may include, but need not be limited to: direct participation in a criminal justice agency; other activity on behalf of a criminal justice interest group; involvement in a University justice agency; service as an intern with a government agency or a private organization with a justice interest; or an active leadership role in a private or community organization. May be repeated once for a total of six credits. Instructor consent required. Consultation with the instructor must take place within the first two weeks of the semester. As needed.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
COAC - Coaching
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
COAC 189Coach Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
COAC 241Coaching of Specific Sport-Volleyball2.00
Theory and techniques, safety, strategy, training schedules, coaching methods and conditioning of volleyball.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COAC 242Coaching of Specific Sport-Football2.00
Theory and techniques, safety, strategy, training schedules, coaching methods and conditioning of football.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
COAC 243Coaching of Specific Sport-Basketball2.00
Theory and techniques, safety, strategy, training schedules, coaching methods and conditioning of basketball.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COAC 244Coaching of Specific Sports: Track & Field/Cross-Country2.00
Theory and techniques, safety, strategy, training schedules, coaching methods and conditioning for all aspects of track and field plus cross country.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COAC 245Coaching of Specific Sports-Baseball/Softball2.00
Theory and techniques, safety, strategy, training schedules, coaching methods and conditioning.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COAC 246Coach Of Spec Spts-Soccer2.00
Theory and techniques, safety, strategy, training schedules, coaching methods and conditioning.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COAC 249Coaching of Specific Sports: Ice Hockey2.00
Theory and techniques, safety, strategy, training schedules, coaching methods and conditioning of ice hockey.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COAC 250Coaching Fieldwork1.00 - 5.00
Experience in coaching sports activities. Each credit equals approximately 36 hours of on-the-job coaching. Consent of instructor is required to register for this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COAC 289Coach Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
COAC 341Principles and Theory of Coaching2.00
Analysis of the role of the coach, including the latest information concerning legal liability, administration/organizational responsibilities; various coaching philosophies, diverse personalities of athletes, developing team cohesion, psychology of coaching and teaching techniques.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Sophomore standing.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COAC 389Coach Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
COAC 456Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology2.00
Psychological and scientific principles as they pertain to understanding participants, sport and exercise environments, group processes, and performance, enhancing health and well-being and facilitating psychological growth and development.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Sophomore standing.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COAC 489Coach Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
COMM - Communicating Arts
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
COMM 104Film and Culture3.00
Students will learn to analyze films from aesthetic and cultural perspectives in a survey of motion pictures from their beginning to the present day. A variety of American and/or international films showing significant artistic development will be screened. The on campus course meets for an additional hour per week to accommodate these in class screenings.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 110Introduction to Communication3.00
Introduction to concepts and theories of communication and the application of those theories to interpersonal interactions, small group processes, and public address.
University Studies Requirements:
Communicating Arts
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 122Theatre Appreciation3.00
An introduction to live performance through the study of artistic components involved in the theatrical process.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 125Acting for the Stage3.00
Introduction to the principles of acting for the stage. Students are guided through exercises, concepts and practical acting experience as they unlock their creative potential.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 167Introduction to Intercultural Communication3.00
This course focuses on the importance of culture in our everyday lives, and the ways in which culture interrelates with and affects communication processes.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COMM 170Media and Society3.00
Survey course charts the most significant developments (technological, cultural, regulatory/political, and economic) in the evolution of several media industries. Students examine key aspects of the changing media landscape-fragmented audiences and multiple channels, increasingly concentrated patterns of ownership, changes in representation of gender, sexuality, and ethnicity, globalization the evolution of social media, and fewer sources of, or need for, traditional news-and consider the implications these changes have for individuals, social groups, the economy, culture, and politics. Emphasizes the building of skills in critical media literacy and analysis.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 180Introduction to Technical Theatre3.00
A hands-on approach to the art of stagecraft. Students will learn and apply techniques in set construction, lighting and sound, scenic painting and stage properties for theatre productions.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 189Comm Arts Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
COMM 203News Writing and Reporting3.00
A basic journalism course in which students practice interviewing, covering events; and writing leads, briefs and shorter news stories, on deadline. The course offers an introduction to the history of journalism, ethical standards, and libel law.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 211Interpersonal Communication3.00
In-depth examination and analysis of communication in relationships across a range of contexts. Includes theoretical perspectives and applied frameworks.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed COMM 110 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 220Theatre Portfolio Review0.00
All theatre majors and minors are required to register for and complete a portfolio review process once a year. Each portfolio must contain a professional resume and performance materials appropriate to their area of specialization.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 226Professional Preparation for Theatre1.00
Job market information, resume, and portfolio development as applicable. Field trip may be required. Open to Theatre majors only.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is successful completion of COMM 125 and COMM 180
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
COMM 254Communication Inquiry3.00
Exploration of communication theories, everyday ways of theorizing communication, and research methods that help us understand the complex ways communication shapes our lives. Emphasis includes theory development, interpretation and analysis, research methodologies, and research design. Students examine the interconnected relationship between theory and method.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 261Beginning Digital Filmmaking3.00
Introduction to basic videography with an extensive hands-on investigation of professional non-linear editing theory and technique.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 273Oral Interpretation3.00
Introduction to the process of lifting words from the page and giving them dimension in a reader’s voice and body.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
COMM 289Comm Arts Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
COMM 302Perspectives on Stage and Screen History3.00
Examination of the relationship between stage and screen texts through the historical lens of a major cycle, movement, nationality, era, author, or genre. Several feature films, plays, and/or television programs exemplifying historically and critically important aspects of the topic will be shown and/or read, building an interdisciplinary conversation across mediums. In exploring the historical relationship between stage and screen, students will develop research and writing skills. Different topics are repeatable.
Prerequisites:
Completion of COMM 104 or COMM 170, and COMM 122 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
COMM 324Acting for the Screen3.00
Introduction to the principles and techniques of acting for the screen. Students collaborate on projects to apply concepts and gain experience acting for the camera.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed COMM 125 and 261.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
COMM 330Advanced News Writing and Reporting3.00
This course expands the student's understanding of journalism; its function in a democracy, techniques of investigation, documentary and series reporting; and transition into the electronics and entrepreneurial delivery of news. Students develop their own news blogs and cover local issues through them, and work in groups to create a final feature project (radio, video, print or online).
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed COMM 203 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 332Communication in Conflict3.00
Theoretical and applied exploration and analysis of communication in diverse conflict contexts.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COMM 348Writing for Stage and Screen3.00
Theory and practice in narrative writing for theatre, television and film. Includes study and application of relevant writing formats.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of WRIT 102 or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
COMM 350Creative Collaboration in Theatre1.00 - 3.00
Specialized study and/or practice in theatrical production. Students register for 1-3 credits based upon the part, assignment and/or duties they have in a particular production. Instructor consent required. repeatable up to 12 credits. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 353Persuasion3.00
Cultural and critical principles and dimensions of persuasion, including the style and structures of persuasion in diverse modes of communicating.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed COMM 110 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COMM 356Community Engagement in Ghana-Study Abroad1.00 - 6.00
Communication is an essential part of community engagement. This course is an experiential course designed to enhance the intercultural communication competence of students as well as to expose them to the challenges and rewards of community development in a developing country. Travel to Ghana occurs over J-Term. Students register for partial credit in both Fall and Spring semesters. Students may register for up to 6 credits. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
J-Term Only
COMM 361Intermediate Digital Filmmaking3.00
Project-intensive course in which students produce, direct, and edit digital film projects. A variety of theories, techniques, and methods will be studied and applied to the student productions. Repeatable for up to 6 credits.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed COMM 261 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 365The Director and the Text3.00
An approach to dramatic texts from the director's perspective. Particular attention paid to the many roles and functions of the director in production.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisites for taking this course is having completed COMM 122, 125, and 180 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
COMM 370Organizational Communication3.00
This course focuses on the communicative processes in organizations as well as the constitutive nature of organizations, and will examine concepts including organizational culture, leadership, emotion, change processes and the development of supportive organizational climates.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 375Production Management3.00
Course focuses on the logistics that contribute to a successful production.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed COMM 180 and 261 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COMM 376Group Communication Processes3.00
Exploration of communication processes within the context of the small group with emphasis on interpersonal relations, group dynamics, leadership and participant functions. An experiential/theoretical course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 388The Design Process3.00
Exploration of the techniques and skill sets needed to design effectively and creatively.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed COMM 180 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
COMM 389Comm Arts Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
COMM 397Digital Audio Recording and Production3.00
This course offers an exploration of digital audio recording and production across a variety of disciplines including film and video, theatre, radio, music, and podcasting. Students will learn about microphone selection and audio recording techniques, as well as non-linear audio editing.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed COMM 261 or consent of the instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 425Communicating Gender3.00
Analysis of gender and its relationship to communication. Emphasis includes the diverse ways gender shapes lived experience, and how communicators' understanding of gender and ourselves as gendered persons get formed in communication. Students will come to understand the range of consequences for our ways of communicating gender, at the personal, cultural, national and global levels.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 455Theorizing Media Culture3.00
Traces the historical development of theoretical frameworks for understanding media throughout the 20th and into the 21st century. The course is reading-intensive and emphasizes the development skills for analyzing, critiquing, and theorizing contemporary media.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed COMM 170 and Junior standing or consent of Instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 462Advanced Digital Filmmaking3.00
Project-intensive course in which students produce, direct, and edit advanced digital film projects. A variety of theories, techniques, and methods will be studied and applied to the student productions. Repeatable up to 6 credits.
Prerequisites:
COMM 361 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 467Advanced Intercultural Communication3.00
Advanced analysis of the communication dimensions involved in enhancing intercultural interactions. Focus is on identity and communication and their relationship to each other in a diverse world.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
COMM 475Internship1.00 - 12.00
Supervised work in professional communications industries and settings. Junior or senior standing, major emphasis in the area of the internship, must have a signed Affiliation Agreement with organization with which you are interning on file in Communicating Arts Office, contract prior to registration and consent of the Communicating Arts Department chair. Minimum 45 hours per credit. The application for internship including written consent from the external agency (Affiliation Agreement) must be submitted to the department chair 30 days prior to enrollment. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 489Comm Arts Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
COMM 491Senior Capstone0.00
Required culminating senior year project which integrates and synthesizes the student's coursework (theories, concepts, skill competencies) into a formal project and experience, negotiated with the student's major advisor and instructor for final consent and approval. Senior capstone is paired with another course in the major. See Communicating Arts Concentration descriptions for paired courses. Pass-Fail. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 495Special Topics Seminar3.00
Specially designed seminar on any number of diverse topics within Communicating Arts. Repeatable up to twelve credits.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
COMM 498Independent Study1.00 - 6.00
Individual investigation, project, and/or production by advanced students in Communicating Arts. Designed in consultation with instructor and should include a study of related literature and/or production techniques. Prerequisites: Instructor consent and contract prior to enrollment. Repeatable up to 12 credits. Arranged.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 499Intern Teaching in Communicating Arts3.00
Working with and assisting a faculty member in teaching a lower-division Communicating Arts course. Includes applied work in preparing and teaching the content of one or more selected units of a course under the supervision of the instructor of record. Open to Communicating Arts majors only. Both faculty and Department Chair consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
COUN - Guidance & Counselor Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
COUN 481Seminars in Counselor Education0.50 - 3.00
Selected topics and problems in counselor education. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or problem is studied each time.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
COUN 489Counseling and Psychological Professions Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
COUN 499Independent Study1.00 - 3.00
Independent study approach to topics are designed in counseling to allow the student to explore particular areas of interest beyond the stated curriculum.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
CSCI - Computer Science
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
CSCI 101Introduction to Computer Science3.00
A first course in computer science providing a survey of current topics as well as core programming and related problems solving skills. Satisfies the mathematics requirement for General Education. MATH 095 is recommended for taking this course.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is the Mathematics Placement Test, or successful completion of MATH 095 (recommended).
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CSCI 170Programming and Technology for the Teaching of Mathematics3.00
Graphing and analysis of functions using graphing calculators, structured programming, use of software packages such as SAGE, Alice, and Geogebra.
Prerequisites:
Acceptable score on the Mathematics Placement Test or completion of MATH 115 with grade of at least C-.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
CSCI 189Computer Science Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
CSCI 201Introduction to Programming3.00
A first programming course for students with a serious interest in computing. Topics include: data types and variables; control structures; primitive and reference data types; methods and modular programming; introduction to abstract data types and classes, and encapsulation; simple algorithms; and programming conventions and style all done in a formal programming language.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 095 with a grade of C- or better or Mathematics Placement Test of MATH 112 or higher.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CSCI 202Object-Oriented Programming3.00
Continuation of CSCI 201. Programming course emphasizing the methodology of programming from an object-oriented perspective and software engineering principles. Topics include: data structure fundamentals; exception handling; abstraction and encapsulation; inheritance and polymorphism; pointer and reference variables; memory management, operator overloading, recursion; concurrent programming; various important algorithms; and file processing techniques.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed CSCI 201 with a grade of C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CSCI 224Assembly Language Programming4.00
Fundamentals of Assembly language programming with an emphasis to microcontroller programming. Topics include: binary representation of numbers and strings, fundamentals of ARM microcontroller architecture; types of memory; access; arithmetic and logical operations; conditional processing; functions and procedures; bit and string processing; recursion and stack manipulation; floating-point programming; interrupt handling; hardware configuration; fundamentals of C programming language; combining assembly with C. Lecture and Lab.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is an acceptable score on the Mathematics Placement Test or completion of an appropriate course. MATH 113 or 102 recommended.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CSCI 281Special Projects1.00 - 4.00
Individual project to learn a programming language not normally offered in the current array of programming courses. Requires weekly progress reports and demonstration of learned skills through a project under the supervision of one or more instructors. May be repeated, but no more than a total of 12 credits may be earned from CSCI 281. Pass-Fail only. Prerequisites: Preliminary project plan and an independent study contract.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CSCI 289Computer Science Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
CSCI 303Algorithms and Data Structures4.00
Continuation of CSCI 202. Concepts and implementation techniques for various algorithms and related data structures of particular interest to computer scientists; analysis of the complexity (efficiency) of algorithms. Topics include: stacks and queues, hashing, graphs and trees, data compression, game strategy, and related algorithms.
Prerequisites:
CSCI 202 with a grade of C- or better is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CSCI 327Embedded Systems Design3.00
A firmware and hardware development course for students with a serious interest in Micro-controller programming, Embedded Systems, or Engineering. Topics include: assembly and/or C programming of micro-controllers, interrupt processing, basic hardware and logic design, programming micro-controller peripherals like ADC, DAC, timers, PWM, comparators, programming and using serial interfaces, communication with user, basics of printed boards design.
Prerequisites:
Completion of CSCI 224 or CSCI 201 is recommended for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
CSCI 331Computer Graphics and Game Design3.00
Programming course emphasizing the implementation of fundamental data structures and algorithms, as well as the use of third-party modeling software and modern game engines, to represent and render 3D graphics. Topics include: color and output devices; 3D geometry and linear algebra; physics of motion and gravity; convexity and collision detection; lighting and shadow; texture maps; and keyframe animation.
Prerequisites:
The prerequisite for taking this course is having completed CSCI 201.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
CSCI 340Software Development and Professional Practice4.00
Best practices in the field of software development. Students complete a medium-scale software project as members of a development team. Topics include: professional ethics and responsibilities; multi-tier systems; software life cycle; requirements analysis; system modeling; implementation and testing; re-engineering and maintainability. Both traditional (waterfall) and newer (agile) methodologies; design patterns; use of current technologies for programming, project management, and source archiving.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed CSCI 303
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CSCI 351Internet Programming3.00
Internet technologies for the World Wide Web such as XHTML, DHTML, CSS, CGI, JavaScript, and HTML5. Topics include: composing XHTML/XML web pages; page layout control with cascading style sheets, form processing and validation, working with images and JavaScript based animation, fundamentals of CGI programming under Unix/Linux environment, server-side programming with Perl and PHP; server configuration issues; and database access.
Prerequisites:
The prerequisite for taking this course is having completed CSCI 201.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
CSCI 356Database Systems3.00
Information Management (IM) plays a critical role in almost all areas where computers are used. The course discusses the representation, organization, transformation, and presentation of information; algorithms for efficient and effective access and updating of stored information; data modeling and abstraction; relational algebra and Structured Query Language (SQL); and database design, implementation, querying, and administration. Pre-requisite: Having completed CSCI 201 is recommended when enrolling in this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CSCI 370Computer Security3.00
A course in modern computer security and how to write secure programs. Topics include computer security, authentication, basic cryptography, identifying and stopping program threats, hacking, and secure software development.
Prerequisites:
CSCI 210 is the required pre-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
CSCI 381Special Projects1.00 - 4.00
Various individual and small-group projects carried out under the supervision of one or more instructors. Requires weekly progress reports plus a final report and/or a final exam. May be repeated, but no more than a total of four credits may be earned from both MATH 381 and CSCI 381. Pass-Fail only. Preliminary project plan and an independent study contract required prior to enrollment.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CSCI 389Computer Science Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
CSCI 390Computer Science Internship1.00 - 4.00
Work in an approved position to gain experience in solving real problems using computer science. Interns may receive salaried appointments with cooperating companies. Pass-Fail only.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CSCI 451Operating Systems4.00
In-depth study of the concepts, issues, and algorithms related to the design and implementation of operating systems. Topics include: process management, process synchronization and inter-process communication; memory management; virtual memory; interrupt handling; processor scheduling; device management; I/O; file systems; and introduction to networking and network security. Students conduct programming projects and case studies to investigate modern operating systems such as Solaris, Linux, and Windows.
Prerequisites:
The prerequisite for taking this course is having completed CSCI 201.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CSCI 461Computer Architecture4.00
In depth study of fundamentals of computer hardware organization. Topics include: digital logic and circuits; hardware optimization principles; finite state machines; computer arithmetic, machine instructions and assembly language; pipeline design, parallelism and micro-programming; memory management and design; storage system design; I/O modules, operating system support; structure and function of computer processors, RISC vs. CISC architecture.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed CSCI 224.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CSCI 470Net-Centric Computing4.00
Introduces the structure, implementation, and theoretical background of computer networking. Topics include: the ISO/OSI reference model and protocol stack, implementation details of various network protocols, routing algorithms, wireless challenges and protocols, mobility management, broadcasting and multicasting, multimedia networking, introduction to network security, Bluetooth application development for microcontrollers and mobile devices..
Prerequisites:
The prerequisite for taking this course is having completed CSCI 201.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CSCI 481Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
Investigation of one or more topics of current interest not covered in other courses. Not intended for independent study projects. May be repeated, but no more than a total of eight credits may be earned from both MATH 481 and CSCI 481.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CSCI 489Computer Science Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
CSCI 498Individual Capstone Project1.00
Students carry out a project under the supervision of a faculty member, write a report, and present the results to the entire department. Taken during senior year.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CSCI 499Group Capstone Project3.00
Group projects in software engineering are carried out by students under supervision of a faculty member to serve community organization. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course (see Academic Service-Learning for more details).
Prerequisites:
The prerequisite for taking this course is having completed CSCI 340.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
 
EC - Early Childhood
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
EC 470Child Life3.00
Seminar course for students completing the Child Life concentration. Theoretical foundations of Child Life practice, the therapeutic relationship, family care, assessment and documentation are covered in depth in this course. Attention is given to understanding children in the context of medical issues as they arise in hospital settings, such as end of life care, chronic disease and emergency care. Includes up to 15 hours of field experience.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
ECED - Early Childhood Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ECED 189Early Childhood Education Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ECED 252Foundations of Early Childhood3.00
Study and evaluation of early childhood models, theory, and practice for children birth to grade 3.. Students study major developmental systems, including motor, socio-emotional, and cognitive-linguistic within a cultural framework. Students review major constructs in contemporary child development, such as attachment, personality and temperament, as well as develop skills in observation and assessment. Includes up to 15 hours of field observation in programs serving young children. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors. Typically Offered: Fall Term Only On Campus and Online; (Spring Term Hybrid, as needed)
Prerequisites:
Teacher Education Non-Academic Test (TB and Criminal Background Check)
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ECED 289Early Childhood Education0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ECED 353Exceptional Needs of Young Children3.00
Examines the knowledge and skills required to assess and identify children birth through age 8 with exceptional educational needs and talents. Principles and theories of atypical child growth and development, learning theory, child maltreatment group organization and management for young children are explored. Develops an understanding of clinical diagnoses common to infants and young children, the knowledge necessary to implement developmentally appropriate assessment tools and to promote parent education and family involvement with young children within an interdisciplinary framework. Includes up to 15 hours of pre-student teaching clinical work in Early Childhood programs. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Completion of ECED 252 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment in ECED 353 Teacher Education Non-Academic Test (TB and Criminal Background Check)
Typically Offered:
Fall Term, On Campus & Online
ECED 355Child Guidance3.00
Focus on developmentally appropriate practices, implementation, and evaluation based on typical and atypical child development, learning theory and research. Focuses on theories of play in early childhood, implementing play based activities for children birth to age 8 through the integration of creative arts, physical activity, social-emotional development and mental health, and basic techniques for therapeutic play. This course includes an examination of early stress and coping, guided imagery, separation and loss. Includes 15 to 20 hours of pre-student teaching clinical work in Early Childhood programs. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Completion of ECED 252, C or better Teacher Education Non-Academic Test (TB and Criminal Background Check)
Typically Offered:
Fall Term, On Campus & Online
ECED 357Early Childhood Methods3.00
This course focuses on developmentally appropriate practices, implementation, and evaluation based on typical and atypical child development and research. Examination of pre-academic and academic skills in a wide range of areas, including mathematics, literacy, environment, science, and social studies for young children birth through age 8. The relationship among the developmental domains of cognitive-linguistic, social-emotional and motor development literacy and language development are explored. Also requires the study of program, curriculum, and instructional approaches that contribute to the preparation of young children for work, including career exploration, practical application of basic skills, and employability skills and attitudes. Includes 15 to 20 hours of pre-student teaching clinical work in Early Childhood programs. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Teacher Education Non-Academic Test (TB and Criminal Background Check) Completion of ECED 252, ECED 353 and ECED 355 C or better
Typically Offered:
Spring Term On Campus & Online
ECED 389Early Childhood Education Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW- Superior course.
ECED 479Family and Culture3.00
Seminar is placed on understanding diversity and cultural competence. Students study and develop communication skills for interacting effectively with children, family systems, and co-workers. Attention is given to understanding children in the context of family and culture, to teaching conflict resolution skills, and to implementing anti-bias practices. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term On Campus & Online
ECED 481Seminars in Early Childhood0.50 - 4.00
Selected topics and problems in the area of early childhood. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or problem is studied each time. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ECED 486Administration of Child Development Programs3.00
Focuses on the rapidly changing field of child development programming. Emphasis on developing the business skills and knowledge that every director must have: funding, budgeting, selecting, training and supervising staff, housing the program, purchasing the equipment, and implementing a standards-based evaluation for the program. Specific licensing procedures, grant writing, and program accreditation are also covered in considerable depth. Designing accessible programs for both typical and atypically developing children is emphasized. Peer-to-Peer teaching event required. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term On Campus & Online
ECED 489Early Childhood Education Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
ECON - Economics
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ECON 189Economics Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
ECON 235Economics in Society3.00
General introductory course highlighting economic and social issues facing society markets and prices, international trade, consumers and firms’ behavior, provision of government services, primarily oriented toward students outside business and economics, including social work, sociology, history, political science, education and the natural sciences.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 250Principles Of Microeconomics3.00
The role of households, firms, and industries in the use of resources. Survey of consumption, production, markets, price determination, and industrial organization including competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly. Policy issues and undergraduate research.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Prerequisites:
BUS 101 (Applies to SBE students only)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 251Principles Of Macroeconomics3.00
Survey of national income accounts, employment theory, economic growth, fiscal and monetary policy, money and banking, inflation and international trade. Policy issues and undergraduate research.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Prerequisites:
BUS 101 (Applies to SBE students only)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 289Economics Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ECON 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ECON 330Money and Banking3.00
Overview of the U.S. financial system, its role in U.S. economic performance, and its ties to global capital markets. Topics include: role of money, financial intermediaries and markets in the economy, general history and rationale for depository regulation, structure and functions of the Federal Reserve, analysis of current economic events and monetary policy.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ECON 333Transportation Economics3.00
Introductory course focuses on domestic transportation, but an international dimension is included. Covers all modes of transportation, their micro-economic and organizational characteristics, role and function in the national economy, regulatory and policy issues, rate setting, interaction in the supply chain, shipper and carrier relations, intermodal operations and environmental impacts.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 335Ecological Economics3.00
Sustainability and sustainable development examined within an ecological economics context. Builds on core economic concepts particularly market failure and addresses issues of sustainable scale, just distribution, and efficient allocation. Emphasizes the relationship between socioeconomic systems and the biological/physical world. Explores the policy challenges of sustainability in a variety of contexts including climate change, energy use, natural resource use, ecosystem services, food security, technological change and property rights.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
ECON 350Intermediate Microeconomics3.00
Economic theory in the analysis of household, firm, and industry behavior. Includes demand, supply, production functions, price theory, industrial organization, factor markets, general equilibrium, and welfare economics; policy issues.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or Econ 235
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ECON 351Intermediate Macroeconomics3.00
Economic theory in the analysis of aggregate economic behavior. Topics Include national income determination and income inequality across countries, economic growth, technological progress, unemployment, inflation, economic booms and recessions, and stabilization policies.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or Econ 235
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ECON 362Public Finance3.00
Theoretical foundation and institutional role of government in the economy. Includes theory of social goods and public decisions, the budgeting process, and the impact of taxation and expenditure on the allocation of resources, distribution of income, and economic stability.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
ECON 370Data Exploration & Economic Analysis3.00
The course provides students with a basic training in searching/finding, collecting/downloading, displaying/visualizing, and analyzing data. It will develop foundational skills of students in interpreting real-world data related to economic and business activity and other relevant areas. Data from numerous sources will be used to make data-driven decision in simple format. Students will obtain a hands-on experience in fundamentals of data by utilizing mainly Microsoft Excel and economic theory for analytical purpose.
Prerequisites:
BUS 270 or equivalent, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ECON 389Economics Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ECON 400Economics Internship2.00 - 7.00
Opportunity for students to earn academic credit by extending classroom learning to real-world settings. Students must obtain the cooperation of an employer and prepare an internship agreement. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
ECON 350, 351 and consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ECON 430International Economics3.00
Overview of the economic interactions between countries in areas of international trade and international finance. Topics include: theories of trade, protectionist policies, trade agreements, economic integration, role of international institutions and multinational enterprises, balance of payments, foreign exchange rates, current international macroeconomics and monetary policy.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ECON 435Development Economics3.00
Nature and process of economic development within historical and international perspectives. Includes alternative theories and strategies of economic development; recent changes and trends in the world economy, and implications for development at the national level; selected case studies and applications.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ECON 438Comparative Economic Systems3.00
Analysis and development of various forms of economic organization and decision mechanisms at the societal level. Emphasis on modern centralized, decentralized, and mixed economies; evaluation of economic performance; case studies.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ECON 470Applied Economic Analysis3.00
Introduction to econometric theory and practice. Course includes lectures and data analysis workshops, a senior-year experience/capstone component. Topics include: statistical inference, regression analysis, model building and problems in regression analysis.
Prerequisites:
BUS 270 or MATH 130 or its equivalent, ECON 350 or ECON 351, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ECON 481Seminar in Economic Issues3.00
In-depth discussion of current economic issues. While the focus will be on the economic aspects, social as well as political elements will be included. Various policy options will be developed, discussed, and analyzed.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ECON 488Independent Study In Economics1.00 - 3.00
Concentrated study of various economics issues.
Prerequisites:
ECON 250, 251 or 235 or consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ECON 489Economics Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
ENGED - English Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ENGED 189English Education Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ENGED 275Developing Literacy3.00
Introduction to language and literacy development from birth through grade 9. Considers current theories of language acquisition, emergent literacy, and the roles literature, reading, and writing play in the development of language competence, including the study of phonics. Pre-student teaching clinical experience. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Teacher Education Non-Academic Test (TB and Criminal Background Check)
Typically Offered:
Fall & Spr On Campus & Online
ENGED 289English Education Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ENGED 339Teaching High School English3.00
Methods of English instruction in the senior high schools; the use of literature, mass media, and other aids in developing skills in listening, speaking, writing, and reading. Includes developing/teaching lessons in a high school English/Language Arts classroom.
Prerequisites:
Admission to Teacher Education Program or consent of instructor, completion of 12 credits of English courses, and cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.
Typically Offered:
Every Third Term Beg. Fall 12
ENGED 370Reading and Language Arts Methods3.00
Study of the principles and techniques of teaching reading and the language arts of speaking, listening, and writing in the kindergarten/elementary/middle schools grades K-9. Tutoring experience required. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Completion of ENGED 275 (C or Better) and Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Teacher Education Non-Academic Test (TB and Criminal Background Check)
Typically Offered:
Fall & Spr On Campus & Online
ENGED 389English Education Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ENGED 406Children's Literature3.00
Study of the various types of fiction and nonfiction literatures published for, used with, or selected by children birth to age 12, particularly for use in the classroom setting. Includes the selection, evaluation, appreciation, and use of children's literature and related media. Explores methods to help develop a child's interest in reading and ability to appreciate quality children's literature.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ENGED 418Language and Literature in the Middle Grades3.00
Study of strategies and techniques supporting the development of language skills through literary themes. By analyzing and responding to literature in a variety of genres, skills such as spelling, grammar, vocabulary building, literary techniques, and oral presentation will be targeted.
Typically Offered:
Every Third Term Beg. Fall 12
ENGED 463Developing Literacy Pre K-33.00
Study of the design and implementation of developmentally appropriate curricula and instruction in the language arts that foster the concept of emergent literacy. Emphasis is on the development of language (both oral and written) and literacy from birth through third grade. Pre-student teaching clinical experience. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Completion of ENGED 370 and Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Teacher Education Non-Academic Test (TB and Criminal Background Check)
Typically Offered:
Fall & Spr On Campus & Online
ENGED 464Developing Literacy Grades 4-123.00
Study of the design and implementation of language arts curricula and instruction in grades 4-12. Emphasis is on language development (oral and written) and literacy from the 4 -12 grades and developmental instruction, focusing on creating strategic lifelong readers and writers.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ENGED 370 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGED 465Content Area Literacy3.00
Study of the use of literacy processes in developing student learning in the content areas. Emphasis on the integration of learning theory and subject matter knowledge in planning instruction which makes profitable use of text and writing to meet curriculum goals in disciplinary literacy.
Prerequisites:
Admission to Teacher Education programs; successful completion of TED 300 and at least one methods course (ART 335, ENGED 339, 370, HHPED 343, 344, HHP 339, MTHED 322, 323, 339, MUSED 382, 383, 384, 386, NSED 321, 339, SSED 331, 339 or TED 339)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ENGED 481Seminars in Education1.00 - 3.00
Selected topics and problems in the area of teacher education. May be taken in several units provided a different topic or problem is studied each time.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ENGED 489English Education Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
ENGL - English
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ENGL 189English elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
ENGL 211British Literature I3.00
Survey of masterpieces and transitional works to 1789.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGL 212British Literature II3.00
Survey of masterpieces and transitional works from 1789 to the present.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 218Nonfiction Literature and Literacy3.00
Critical analysis and response to the structure and content of historic and contemporary nonfiction works in a variety of genres, including humorous writings, essays, speeches, professional articles, and memoirs.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Every Third Term Beg. Fall 12
ENGL 221American Literature I3.00
Survey of principal American writers from the Colonial Period through the mid-19th Century.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGL 222American Literature II3.00
Survey of principal American writers from the mid-19th century to the present.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 228Multi-Ethnic American Literature3.00
Survey of a variety of multi-ethnic American literatures, including Native American, African-American, Latinx, Chicanx, Asian American, and various European-American writings starting with the oral traditions up to the 21st Century. Typically Offered: Fall and Spring Terms online, Fall or Spring on campus
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
ENGL 229Literature by Women3.00
Survey of British and American women's literature from the Middle Ages to the Contemporary Period. Women's literature across cultures, genres, and time periods.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ENGL 241World Literature I3.00
Survey of selected literary works in translation from the Ancient World through the mid-17th Century. Includes works from the Western and non-Western world.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGL 242World Literature II3.00
Survey of selected literary works in translation from the late 17th Century through the Contemporary Period. Includes works from the Western and non-Western world.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 289English Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
ENGL 311Shakespeare I3.00
Study of representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through "Hamlet."
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGL 312Shakespeare II3.00
Study of selected problem comedies, later tragedies, and romances.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 315Chaucer3.00
Study of Chaucer's major writings and the historical and intellectual conditions that produced the writer and his works.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ENGL 326Major Author3.00
Study of selected writings of a major literary figure or figures. May be repeated for credit with different author or pair of authors.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 328Multi-Ethnic American Novels3.00
Study of novels by contemporary multi-ethnic American writers.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 331British Literary Periods3.00
Study of British poetry, prose, and the literary developments in a specific British literary period. May be repeated for credit with different content.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ENGL 332American Literary Periods3.00
Study of American poetry, prose, and the literary developments in a specific American literary period. May be repeated for credit with different content.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 368Short Story I (Pre 1945)3.00
Study of the genre of the historic short story to 1945.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 369Short Story II (Post 1945)3.00
Study of the genre of the contemporary short story after 1945.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 389English Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
ENGL 40319th Century British Women Novelists3.00
Study of writings of six major women novelists in Great Britain during the Romantic and Victorian Ages: Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Bronte; and George Eliot.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 3 credits of English Literature or consent of the instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 404Early American Fiction Writers: Poe, Melville, Hawthorne3.00
Study of the three major Romantic period fiction writers: Poe, Melville and Hawthorne.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 3 credits of English Literature or consent of the instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 405History of the English Language3.00
Development of English from 449 A.D. to the present.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 3 credits of English Literature or consent of the instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ENGL 409Age of Pope, Swift, Gay3.00
Study of the literature of the Scriblerus Club: Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, and John Gay.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 419The Rise of the Novel3.00
Study of the history and theory of the emergent novel genre as it developed in eighteenth-century Britain.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 426Popular 20th Century Writers3.00
Study of writings of five popular American and British 20th century writers: Huxley, Golding, Salinger, Plath, Cisneros.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ENGL 429The British Romantic Period3.00
Study of the literature produced in Great Britain during the Romantic period (approximately 1798-1832).
Prerequisites:
Completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 436Hemingway's Artistry3.00
Study of Hemingway's fiction through a consideration of his artistic vision.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 3 credits of English Literature or consent of the instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 439The Victorian Age3.00
Study of the literature of the Victorian period in British Literature (1830s to 1800s).
Prerequisites:
Completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 446Key American Modernist Writers3.00
Study of the writings of three major American modernist writers: Crane, Anderson, O'Connor.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 449Postcolonial Literature3.00
Study of Anglophone postcolonial literature.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 3 credits of English Literature or consent of the instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 456Avant-Garde Literature3.00
Study of the development of the Avant-Garde as a specific component of modern and postmodern literature.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 460Special Topics in Literature3.00
Studies in literary themes, genres, theories, or history. May be repeated for credit with different content.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ENGL 465Modern American Poetry3.00
The study of major writers and poetic movements in modern American poetry.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 466Contemporary American Poetry3.00
Study of major writers and poetic movements in contemporary American poetry.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 3 credits of English Literature or consent of the instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 479Literary Criticism3.00
Historical survey of literary theory. Discussion of classical and subsequent critical theories pertaining to the function, understanding, and appreciation of literature.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 489English Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ENGL 491Senior Capstone Experience0.00
Required culminating senior year project. Students work closely with an English faculty member to further develop a research project initiated in a course from Category 4, 5, or 6 within the Major. The project will be presented in a public forum and will have both a written and an oral component. Pass-Fail. Arranged.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed 3 credits of 300 or 400 level English course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 498Independent Study1.00 - 6.00
Advanced study for students who have shown themselves capable of independent work, carried on under direction of a staff member chosen by the student with approval of the department chair. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
ENSC - Environmental Science
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ENSC 100Environmental Science2.00
Basic course in human ecology for students with limited training in science. Emphasizes environmental problems related to human activity in the modern world. Meets the General Education environmental science requirement and meets the Wisconsin Teaching Certification Requirement for Environmental Science. Does not count toward the Biology major. No prerequisite. (Lecture two hours.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ENSC 350Environmental Science Research Methods2.00
This is a field-based environmental science research methods class that will: 1) provide students with hands-on experience with a suite of research methods, 2) provide examples of real-world science-based problem-solving, and 3) demonstrate how environmental research can provide needed information for natural resource managers to make management decisions.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 340.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENSC 489Environmental Science Elective0.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ENSC 491Research in Environmental Science1.00 - 4.00
A course developed in cooperation with faculty or area research laboratories designed to provide students with practical experience in environmental science. Candidates for this course must outline a research problem and complete a Contract for Independent Learning prior to registration. (May be repeated for a total of four credits.) Instructor consent required. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement for Environmental Science.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ENSC 496Internship in Environmental Science1.00 - 4.00
On-the-job experience with local agencies (e.g. Wisconsin DNR) that provides students with opportunities to apply their skills to practical problems. In collaboration with a faculty sponsor, students must complete a Contract for Independent Learning prior to registration. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
ENST - Environmental Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ENST 200People and the Environment: Challenges & Actions3.00
This course builds on knowledge of physical processes of human-environment interactions, such as climate change and freshwater depletion, to learn about the social and cultural processes that are crucial for understanding the environmental challenges that human beings face and our best means of dealing with them. The course includes lecture, discussion, experiential learning, and student research.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
 
ESL - English as a Second Language
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ESL 131Reading Academic Texts3.00
Academic reading and vocabulary development for advanced-level ESL students. Texts include adapted and unadapted textbook chapters and magazine and journal articles. Students placed into ESL courses must take these courses in their first semester at UWS. Students must pass with a C- or better. Open only to non-native speakers of English through the UW-Superior ESL Placement Test or with instructor permission.
ESL 132Writing for Academic Purposes3.00
English grammar and composition for academic purposes. Includes advanced grammar, critical reading, research skills, rhetorical approaches to a topic, writing processes, organization of content, re-writing and editing. Students placed into ESL courses must take these courses in their first semester at UWS. Students must pass with a C- or better. Open only to non-native speakers of English through the UW-Superior ESL Placement test or with instructor permission.
ESL 133Listening to Academic English2.00
Structured practice in listening and note-taking using university lectures and a variety of other academic presentations. Focuses on lecture organization, language cues and academic vocabulary. Students placed into ESL courses must take these courses in their first semester at UWS. Students must pass with a C- or better. Open only to non-native speakers of English through the UW-Superior ESL Placement test or with instructor permission.
ESL 134Speaking for Academic Purposes2.00
Guided practice in developing elements of clear speech for advanced-level ESL students. Emphasis on pronunciation, discussion skills and effective individual and group presentations. Students placed into ESL courses must take these courses in their first semester at UWS. Students must pass with a C- or better. Open only to non-native speakers of English through the UW-Superior ESL Placement test or with instructor permission.
 
FIN - Finance
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FIN 189Finance Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FIN 210Personal Finance3.00
Examines the basic principles and concepts of personal financial planning, purpose and operation of financial markets and institutions, economic impact of financial literacy, and behavioral aspects of personal finance. Decisions relating to money management, credit and borrowing, real estate ownership, savings, and investment are studied from the standpoint of the individual consumer. Recommended for non-business majors.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FIN 212Field Studies In Finance1.00 - 3.00
Provides non-traditional adult learners with limited business experiences and presently enrolled freshmen and sophomores an opportunity to apply general business knowledge to selected business projects. Pass-Fail only. Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FIN 288Independent Study in Finance1.00 - 3.00
Concentrated study of various business problems.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FIN 289Finance Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FIN 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different. Consent of cooperating instructor and director. SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
FIN 320Principles Of Finance3.00
Examines the basic principles and concepts of financial management. Topics include time value of money, security, valuation, risk, financial analysis and planning, working capital management, cost of capital, capital structure and capital budgeting,
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE or (Jr. status and Acct 101, Econ 235, Bus 211, and Bus 270; or instructor permission)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
FIN 321Managerial Finance3.00
Advanced concepts and techniques of financial management, emphasizing the overall environment and decision making process by financial managers. Topics include: modern portfolio theory, capital structure theory, and case studies.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and FIN 320.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FIN 389Finance Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FIN 400Finance Internship2.00 - 7.00
Opportunity for students to earn academic credit by extending classroom learning to current area business settings. Students obtain the cooperation of an employer and prepare a learning contract. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE, consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
FIN 412Field Studies In Finance1.00 - 3.00
Provides non-traditional adult learners with some academic and/or broad business experiences and presently enrolled juniors and seniors an opportunity to apply general business knowledge to selected business projects. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and consent of coopering instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FIN 420Risk Management3.00
Principles and valuation models of derivatives for risk management. Application of financial instruments such as futures/forwards, options, and swaps to mitigate the financial risk of corporations related to the uncertainty of future pricing of commodities, interest rates, foreign exchange rates, and stock price indexes. .
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and FIN 320, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FIN 426Investments3.00
The study of financial securities, their valuation, and the markets where they are traded. Analyze economic and market factors affecting risk, returns, and timing of investment decisions. Examine investment decision making within the framework of modern portfolio theory. Alternative investments including derivatives (options and futures) are also examined.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE and FIN 320 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FIN 488Independent Study-Finance1.00 - 3.00
Concentrated study of various business problems.
Prerequisites:
Admitted to SBE, consent of cooperating instructor and director, SBE.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FIN 489Finance Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
FLAN - Foreign Language
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FLAN 189Foreign Language Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FLAN 289Foreign Language Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FLAN 389Foreign Language Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FLAN 389Foreign Language Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FLAN 489Foreign Language Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
FNS - First Nation Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FNS 101Beginning Ojibwa Language4.00
For beginning students in Ojibwa language. Introduction to the phonetics, pronunciation, and rhythm of the Ojibwa language. A standardized spelling system and basic vocabulary will be used; focus on oral fluency.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 110Survey of First Nations Culture3.00
Examination of traditional and contemporary First Nations culture. Includes the legends, religion, poetry, music, design, dance, oratory, and history of tribal groups in North America.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FNS 151Introduction to Tribal Administration3.00
Introduction to the basics of First Nations law and tribal governments, and how federal Indian policy has affected development of tribal governments that exist today. Cross-listed as POLS 151.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FNS 189Indian Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FNS 201Intermediate Ojibwa Language4.00
Speaking and comprehension of basic Ojibwa speech patterns. Development of rudimentary reading knowledge, conversational skills, and elementary grammar. Emphasis on vocabulary development and cultural perspectives. No prerequisite.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 230First Nations Myths and Legends3.00
Introduction to the oral tradition of First Nations people. Explores traditional stories and legends told by native peoples for generations. Students will understand the meaning they provided past generations of people and how their message is carried into the modern world.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 242First Nations Values and Spiritual Beliefs3.00
Examines a broad range of First Nations religious beliefs as they relate to the various cultural values of First Nations in North America. Emphasis on the spiritual significance of First Nations ceremonies and their relationship to the environment. Traditional teachings of First Nations will be examined as they relate to the lifestyles of First Nations people historically and today.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 289First Nations Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
FNS 304First Nations Literature3.00
Examines literature by and about First Nations people. Students read novels, short stories, and poetry by First Nations authors. Students will be made aware of how this literature differs from traditional western literature in content and theme. Also covers traditional stories that contemporary First Nations literature is based on.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 307Ojibwa Culture3.00
Examines various aspects of the Ojibwa culture in depth. A hands-on approach, with students going into the field and participating in lab activities such as wild ricing, sugar bush, drum and dance, and others. Can be repeated up to six credits.
FNS 324First Nations Wisconsin History3.00
History of the native peoples of Wisconsin from prehistoric times to the present. Major emphasis on the six federally recognized tribes in Wisconsin. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 324.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 333The History of Indigenous Peoples3.00
A course on a global history of Indigenous Peoples which will explore the history of conquered and marginalized societies in a world systems context. The course examines their loss of economic resources, environmental security, cultural, linguistic and political sovereignty and their strategies for survival and reemergence as re-empowered peoples. Examples from many regions of the world with many films. Examples may change but the learning goals remain the same. Cross-listed as ANTH/FNS/HIST 333. Code 4. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
FNS 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica (located in present-day Mexico, Guatemala, and neighboring areas), both past and present, and their transformations and influence across time and borders. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 2.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 386Working with American Indian Families3.00
Focuses on issues related to contemporary American Indian family life, including recognition of the importance of American Indian tribal contexts and community-based assets; development and implementation of the Indian Child Welfare Act; impact of sovereignty and other social policy issues on American Indian families; and effective social work approaches to use when helping American Indian families. Offers an opportunity to better understand and work more effectively with American Indian families. Open to non-majors and can be used as a General Education diversity requirement. Cross-listed FNS/SOW 386.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 389First Nations Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FNS 410First Nations Law3.00
Examines the unique relationship between indigenous tribes of the United States and the United States government through the context of tribal sovereignty. Explores the impact of the Supreme Court and the court's interpretation of legislation and judicial decisions of the past. Also explores the future of the domestic dependent nations status and tribal sovereignty.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of FNS 151 or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 430Contemporary Issues in First Nations Society3.00
Study of the problems faced by First Nations tribes in different parts of the country along with their relationships to local and national governments. Insight into the life and culture of First Nations in the contemporary world, and the political and tribal issues, which impact on the role of First Nations in today's society.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 460The Study of First Nations Women3.00
Exploration of the First Nations woman's social roles and lifestyles from a variety of tribal cultures in North America. Focuses on traditional and contemporary values and roles of First Nations women. Cross-listed as FNS/GST 460.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FNS 480First Nations Society and Culture: Field Research4.00
Teaches basic social science research techniques and how they apply to the First Nations community. Group or individual field research projects will be completed during the semester.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 481Counseling the First Nations3.00
Explores counseling theory and application techniques from a First Nations perspective. First Nations world view and linear vs. holistic thinking are principle topics. Group and individual counseling is addressed and practiced. Designed for people in helping professions that deal with First Nations clients. Cross-listed as COUN 481/681.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 486Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in First Nations Studies selected by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when instructor and/or topics are different. Instructor's approval required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
FNS 489First Nations Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
FNS 490Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Supervised independent study and/or research in First Nations Studies. Instructor's approval required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
FREN - French
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FREN 101Beginning French I3.00
Study of language fundamentals with emphasis on development of listening and speaking skills. Practice in reading and writing. Only for students with no previous French study.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
FREN 102Beginning French II3.00
Continuation of FREN 101. Appropriate for someone with up to two years of high school French.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FREN 189French Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
FREN 201Intermediate French I3.00
Intensive oral practice; review of fundamentals of French; conversation; reading. Appropriate for someone with two or three years of high school French.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FREN 289French elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
FREN 389French elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
FREN 489French elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
 
FYS - First Year Seminar
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FYS 100First-Year Seminar-Health Promotion/Human Performance3.00
First Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 101First-Year Seminar- Humanities/History3.00
First-Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 102First-Year Seminar-Humanities Literature3.00
First-Year Seminar
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - Literature
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 103First-Year Seminar-World Language,Culture and Philosophy3.00
First Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 105First Year Seminar-Communicating Arts3.00
First Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FYS 106First-Year Seminar-Science/Environmental3.00
First- Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 107First-Year Seminar-Science/Lab4.00
First-Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 108First-Year Seminar-Fine Arts/Crit and Appreciation3.00
First-Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 109First-Year Seminar-Aesthetic Experience3.00
First-Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 110First-Year Seminar-Math Computer Science3.00
First-Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 111First Year Seminar-Humanities-History, Non-Western3.00
First Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 112First Year Seminar-Humanities Literature, Non Western3.00
First Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 113First Year Seminar-World Lang, Culture, Non-Western3.00
First Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 114First Year Seminar-Social Sciences,Non Western3.00
First-year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 115First-Year Seminar-Communicating Arts, Non Western3.00
First-Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 118First Year Seminar-FA-Art Hist,Criticism and Appreciation and Non-Western3.00
First-Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 119First-Year Seminar-Aesthetic Experience-Non Western3.00
First-Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 120First Year Seminar-Health Promotion/Human Performance, NW3.00
First Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 121First Yr Seminar-Humanities-History-Diversity3.00
First Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 122First Year Seminar-Humanities-Literature-Diversity3.00
First Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 123First-Year Seminar-World Language, Culture and Philosophy, Diversity3.00
First Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 124First-Year Seminar-Social Sciences, Diversity3.00
First-Year Seminar
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 125First-Year Seminar-Communicating Arts and Diversity3.00
First-Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 128First Year Seminar-FA-Art Hist Criticism and Appreciation and Diversity3.00
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
FYS 129First-Year Seminar-Aesthetic Experience and Diversity3.00
First-Year Seminar
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
 
GEOG - Geography
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
GEOG 100World Regional Geography3.00
Develops basic factual knowledge and awareness of the physical and cultural features of the world environment. Explores regional and world scale patterns of resources, climate, applied technology and trade, political alignments, and other aspects of the current world. All world political units are analyzed from a regional perspective. Students gain significant knowledge of world spatial relationships. Offered: Every Fall and Spring Terms on campus; Every Spring Term On Line.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOG 102Cultural Geography3.00
Explores the influence of culture on perceptions, decisions, and interpersonal relations on both planetary and local scales of life. A broad range of cultural topics are considered, including the origins of culture, human development, political and social organization, religions and languages, and evolving human landscapes. Prepares students to be well-informed citizens of our increasingly interconnected global community. Offered On Campus Spring Terms and On Line Fall Terms.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOG 189Geography Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOG 241Fundamentals of GIS I4.00
Broad introduction to cartography and Geographic Information Systems with emphases on both theory and practice. Fundamental principles of numerical data entry, digitizing, data manipulation and analysis, and interpretation of spatially referenced data will be explored. Additional topics include cartographic basics such as mapping, coordinate systems, projections and remote sensing. Students are introduced to the skills necessary to run a vector-based GIS. The GIS lab offers students an opportunity to use GPS systems and GIS (ArcGIS10 Desktop, ArcGIS Pro, and ArcGIS Online to improve their conceptual and technical GIS skills while working one-on-one with the instructor. Lab will cover map design, geodatabase creation, spatial data download, examining metadata, geoprocessing, digitizing, geocoding, spatial analysis, and 3D-analysis. In the lab each student will carry a real world project using ArcGIS software. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) ITS 108 or basic computer skills recommended. Offered Every Fall and Spring Terms of Even Years Only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOG 281Special Topics1.00 - 6.00
In-depth study of specialized topics in geography selected by the faculty on the basis of student interests/needs. May include workshops. seminars, special issues, etc. This course may be repeated when topics are different. Offered on demand.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOG 289Geography Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOG 298Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Advanced study for students who have shown themselves capable of independent work, carried out under the direction of a faculty member chosen by the student. Offered on demand. Instructor consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOG 302Economic Geography3.00
Study of how spatial organization of economic activities affects such issues as economic growth, employment, investment patterns, mobility, and the prices paid for goods. Industrial economic activities are examined by addressing issues such as why some areas are more suitable than others for economic activities and how markets function in the real world. Transportation networks that connect areas and issues of global interdependence are central themes in this course. This course has been approved as Writing Certificate Eligible (WCE)--see section of catalog for WCE Description/details. (lecture two hours, laboratory two hours) Offered On Campus Fall Terms, and On Line Spring Terms.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course for TRSP majors is completion of ECON 250 and ECON 251. Non-TRSP majors are required to take a GEOG course or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOG 343Fundamentals of GIS II4.00
Introduction to GIS-specific content, including database, advance editing using topology, geocoding, and some advanced analysis operations. It covers geo-statistical analysis, site suitability and modeling, raster analysis, and ArcScan tool. Introduces students to some advance functionalities of ArcGIS Desktop, ArcGIS Pro, and introduction to ArcGIS online. Laboratory activities include mapping density, mapping change, finding what's inside, finding what's nearby, measuring geographic distribution, analyzing pattern, and identifying clusters, best suitable sites, and modeling. Students examine a wide range of GIS functions using the diverse analysis and data management tools. Each student is required to complete a real world project using GIS software
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GEOG 241.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GEOG 350Geography of Wisconsin3.00
A spatial examination of the state of Wisconsin utilizing both physical and human considerations. It synthesizes and emphasizes the 20th and 21st century environmental issues that are related to physical characteristics such as geologic history, hydrologic, and climatic forces as well as how these physical factors have impacted the human development of the state. Examples of human issues include indigenous and immigrant settlement, economic, and political patterns.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOG 357Advanced Topics in Human/Environment Interaction3.00
Advanced Topics in Human/Environment Interaction is a study of the effects of the physical and biological factors affecting human population growth, evolution, development, and settlement as well as how our behavior impacts the physical world. The influence of environment on human development, and the schools of thought that develop, crosses many disciplinary areas of study. The basic theories integral to biology and geography, often studied separately as part of discipline-­-specific courses, will be integrated into the study of humans and their physical environment. The emphasis of the course is to offer topics from a variety diverse perspectives, with both a reading/lecture and lab component.
Prerequisites:
ENSC 100 or GEOL 120 or Instructor Consent Required.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GEOG 389Geography Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOG 402Urban Planning and Transportation Systems3.00
Comparative examinations of planning theories and practices that shaped the geography of 19th and 20th century urban and suburban areas. Introduction to the interurban and interurban influences of transportation systems on land use and planning will be explored. Stresses the ways in which planners and planning ideologies have responded to different social, economic, political and technological (transportation and communication) innovations and pressures. The class includes an examination of 21st Century problems, pressures and solutions to urban and transportation needs. Qualifies as an Academic-Service Learning course (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). A significant semester-long group AS-L project, which connects the student with the Twin Ports community, is a substantial learning goal in the face-to-face section of this course. Cross-listed as GEOG/TRSP 402. S18, S20.
Prerequisites:
For non-SBE majors, completion of GEOG 302 or consent of Instructor. For SBE majors, completion of GEOG 302 and admission to the SBE program.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GEOG 442Advanced Principles of GIS4.00
Students learn how to develop and implement various GIS application projects. The course covers spatial data conversion, spatial database management and advance spatial analysis. Introduces image analysis and spatial analysis utilizing the extensions of ArcGIS Desktop and ArcGIS Pro (geostatistical analysist, spatial analyst, network analyst, 3-D analyst) and remote sensing raster analysis). Each student designs a project based on their specialty (biology, environmental science, land use, transportation, hydrogeology, demographics, economic analysis, etc.). Course builds on the principles introduced in GEOG 343 and gives a more in-depth understanding of the technical aspects involved in spatial data handling, analysis, and modeling. Very advanced principles of ArcGIS will be used as theoretical and applied aspects are examined through a series of practical exercises and assignments culminating in the development of a prototype GIS.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GEOG 343
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOG 450Capstone in Geography3.00
This course integrates and extends classroom learning through guided research on student- selected interdisciplinary geography and geography-related topics. After an introduction to geographic research methods and theory, students will conduct an investigation of a spatial question. Students work individually, in consultation with faculty and interaction with peers in class, to produce a final product that is pertinent to the major/minor. Examples of final product are: a formal written research paper, classroom-ready teaching unit, workshop materials for presentation.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOG 452GIS Special Project2.00
This course is an undergraduate level course planned at developing more advanced GIS skills. The course is a project-based course (2 credits) targeted students who have taken the first 2 courses in the GIS minor (GEOG241 and GEOG 343). The class is not introductory and students will begin using more advanced analysis tools in ESRI GIS software (ArcGIS Desktop, ArcGIS Pro, and ArcGIS Online). In this course students will propose, design, and implement a real-world project. Students will identify a concept, a problem or a concern they wish to address or solve, and execute the project to final data products. Student completed the project will demonstrate their proficiency of the subject matter of the GIS applications.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GEOG 241 and GEOG 343
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
GEOG 481Special Topics1.00 - 6.00
In-depth study of specialized topics in geography selected by the faculty on the basis of student interest/need. May include workshops, seminars, special issues, etc. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Offered on demand.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOG 489Geography Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOG 491Undergraduate Research1.00 - 4.00
A course developed in cooperation with faculty or area geography specialists to provide practical experience in experimental geography. Candidates for this course must outline a research problem or focus of study. Registration for credit can only be made after all supervisory and support requirements have been assured and the formal research plan is approved. May be repeated for a total of four credits.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of two GEOG courses and consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOG 492Geography Seminar1.00
Study of a topic through literature research. Each student studies a topic and effectively summarizes the available information in written and oral form. Prerequisite: Two prior geography courses and consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOG 496Internship1.00 - 4.00
On-the-job experience with local agencies such as the Department of Transportation, urban and/or regional planning agencies, historical societies, or other approved geography-related organization designed to provide students with realistic opportunities to apply their skills to practical problems. Registration for credit can only be made after all supervisory and support requirements have been assured. Prerequisite: Two prior geography courses and consent of instructor. Offered on demand.
GEOG 498Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Advanced study for students who have shown themselves capable of independent work, carried out under the direction of a faculty member chosen by the student. Offered on demand. Instructor consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
GEOL - Geology
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
GEOL 110The Dynamic Earth4.00
An introductory science class that emphasizes the foundational principles and concepts of geology. Topics include: minerals, rocks, Earth's internal structure, plate tectonics, geologic structures, the rock cycle, climate change, glaciers, groundwater, geologic structures, the rock cycle, climate change, glaciers, groundwater, geologic resources and earthquakes. One weekend field trip. (lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours).
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOL 120Our Water Resources4.00
The Water & Environment course is designed for all students and aim to train students broadly in water resources. The course will be emphasizing on surface water, groundwater, water use, water quality, dams, water allocation, water use conflict, and emerging water issues. Water resources will be linked to the environmental issues that facing our globe. Problem in global change related to the land surface and water through hydrological cycle, contamination, recharge-discharge, and water scarcity will be addressed. Students will work with various software (Aquachem, GIS, Excel) and learn through the lab and assignments problem solving skills.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOL 170Earth Science for Teachers2.00
Broad survey of basic concepts and principles of astronomy, geology, oceanography and meteorology. Emphasizes the relationship between Earth processes and the fundamentals of chemistry, physics, and biology. Designed especially for elementary education majors in order to fulfill an earth science requirement. This class does not meet the General Education requirement for a laboratory science. (Lecture one hour, laboratory two hours.)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOL 189Geology Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOL 281Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in Geology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. May be repeated when topics are different. Offered on demand. Instructor consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOL 289Geology Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOL 315Climatology3.00
Exploration of the processes that control Earth's climate and influence climate change affect the environment on timescales of hundreds of millions to tens of years. The first half of the course focuses on understanding the various components of the Earth system that affect climate. The second half emphasizes case studies and techniques useful for understanding climate change.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of BIOL 130, CHEM 105, or GEOL 110.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
GEOL 350Physical Oceanography3.00
Emphasizes the physical and chemical processes that operate in the world's oceans. Topics include: the history of oceanography, plate tectonics of the ocean basins, ocean basin sedimentation, ocean water physical and chemical characteristics, ocean currents, waves and tides, and environmental issues of concern to marine scientists. (Lecture 3 hours)
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking is course is successful completion of GEOL 110.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
GEOL 360Geomorphology4.00
Geomorphology is the study of landscapes and landforms. Geomorphology entails the systematic description of landforms, analysis of the processes that form them, and understanding their response to changes in climate, tectonics, human disturbance, and the progression of time. Includes field trips. (Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours)
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GEOL 110 and completion or co-enrolled in GEOG 241 or instructor permission.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
GEOL 389Geology Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOL 400Watershed Hydrology4.00
A study of water properties, occurrence, distribution, and movement and their relationship with the environment within each phase of the hydrological cycle. Examines water quantity and quality issues, and water management policies. Uses mix of lecture- and problem-based approaches. Students will be introduced to techniques used in addressing environmental problems such as flooding, water supplies, and groundwater contamination and evaluation. Recommended for science students interested in the environmental sciences and/or securing a position in the environmental field. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is successful completion of CHEM 105 and either GEOL 110 or GEOL 120 or instructor consent. MATH 113 is recommended.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
GEOL 481Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in Geology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. May be repeated when topics are different. Offered on demand. Instructor consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOL 489Geology Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOL 491Undergraduate Research1.00 - 4.00
Course developed in cooperation with faculty and area research facilities designed to provide students with practical experience in geological research. Candidates for this course must outline a research problem. Registration for credit can only be made after all supervisory and support requirements have been assured and the formal research plan is approved. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Offered on demand.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
GEOL 496Internship1.00 - 4.00
On-the-job experience with local agencies and research laboratories to provide students with practical knowledge of careers in the field of geology. Designed to provide students with realistic opportunities to apply their skills to practical problems. Registration for credit can only be made after all supervisory and support requirements have been made. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Offered on demand.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
GST - Gender Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
GST 150Introduction to Gender Studies3.00
Introduction to Gender Studies explores various answers to the question: How does gender influence the way in which we interact with and are impacted by society? To that end, this course introduces students to feminist perspectives and challenges students to incorporate self-exploration with academic skill to analyze one's personal experience, and the experience of others, within social institutions such as family, government, employment, religion, and education through the lens of gender. We will examine how issues of gender within our society intersect with race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, differing abilities, and age to perpetuate a system of oppression.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GST 189Gender Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GST 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/GST 210.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GST 255Gender and Sexuality in Writing3.00
Explores writing on gender and sexuality with a focus on texts by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex (LGBTQI) and allied writers from diverse cultures, classes, races, and ethnicities. Students discover and deepen their own perspectives through writing and reading. Students of all genders and gender identities are welcome. Cross listed as WRIT/GST 255. Course includes Academic Service-Learning (AS-L) high-impact practice.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 258Gender, Psychology and Society3.00
Discussion and study of development of gender roles across the lifespan. Topics include the social construction of sex and gender differences, status and power, feminist psychology, childhood and adolescence, relationships, family, work and achievement, and diversity. Meets the Diverse Perspectives requirement for Psychology major. Meets a requirement for the Gender Studies minor. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course, involving a 15-hour community placement commitment (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). Cross-listed as PSYC/GST 258.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 270Psychology of Men and Masculinity3.00
This course is devoted to exploring men's experience in society, the cultural messages men receive about masculinity, and the implications of these for behavior and mental health. Topics include: ideology about the transition from boyhood to manhood, the privileges and perils of manhood status, men's friendships, work primacy, health issues, intimacy and power issues with women, negotiating male sexuality, male violence, and assumptions regarding men's role in the family unit. This is a course for both women and men about issues related to the social construction of masculinity in our culture. Cross-listed as PSYC/GST 270. Meets the Diverse Perspectives requirement for Psychology major.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
GST 289Gender Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GST 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements, consult your advisor. The course can be repeated only if the content is different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GST 310Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective3.00
Examines the cultural construction of gender from an anthropological, cross-cultural perspective. Attention is paid to sociocultural factors such as kinship, colonialism, industrialism, and economic development which influence gender definitions, roles, and the structure of gender relations. Cross-listed as ANTH/GST 310.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
GST 312Gender,Crime,and Justice3.00
Exploration of the social construction of gender in crime and delinquency as well as in justice systems; analysis of how assumptions about female and male natures, as well as appropriate roles and positions in society affect the interpretation and application of law; comparison of women/girls and men/boys as offenders, victims and practitioners. Cross-listed as CJUS/GST 312.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GST 317Men and Women in Nazi Germany3.00
In this upper-division examination of the nature of Nazi society and Fascism more generally, the central focus will be on gender--the images of and attitudes towards masculinity and femininity, and alternative sexualities, in the Third Reich. Changes in the role afforded to men and women, and in beliefs about what it means to be male and female, were at the very center of the revolutionary changes that constituted the shift to the "Modern Era." In seeking to understand Fascist attitudes toward gender, therefore, the course is seeking to understand not some peripheral aspect of Nazi society, but its very core, the very essence of modern democracy and its nemesis, Fascism. Much attention will be focused on developing skill in understanding and interpreting films and other visual artifacts and how they reveal ideals and assumptions about gender. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 317. Code 1. G.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 322The Construction of Gender in the United States3.00
An examination of gender and sexual identities and roles in the United States from colonial times through the present. Explores the evolution of these roles and identities and the social, economic, and political forces that shape them. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 322. G.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 329Women In Art3.00
Women's expression in painting and sculpture, primarily of the 19th and 20th Centuries.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 365Philosophy of Love and Sex3.00
In this course we will begin with the assumption that love and sex cannot be reduced to "a commotion of one's anatomy." Instead we will consider them as two of the most meaningful aspects of human existence, as our most intimate and profound ways of relating to others and to ourselves. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 365.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GST 374Women and Politics3.00
In the United States, women hold 18% of the seats in the 112th Congress, marking the nation 85th in its level of representation for women. Globally, women constitute 15% of all members of parliament, although significant regional variation persists. How do gendered hierarchies continue to shape and structure political systems? Why have women not yet reached parity in elected office? Should women be represented as women? What difference do women bring to elective office? These and other questions are explored throughout the course, with particular attention to the historical exclusion of women from the public arena, the methods used by women to enter electoral and activist politics, and the current political status of women in the United States and globally. Cross-listed as POLS/GST 374.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 389Gender Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GST 393Women, Colonialism, and Nationalism in Modern Southeast Asia3.00
This upper-division seminar examines the role women played in Southeast Asian history from the 19th century till the present, specifically as the region confronted the challenges of colonialism and post-colonial nation-building. Among key issues covered are (1) the encounter between Western guns and local political systems; (2) race and racism (or, why the other group is always a barbarian); (3) how Southeast Asia became “modern”; (4) decolonization and/or revolution; (4) political, economic and religious challenges in post-colonial nationalism; (5) the intimate and everyday lives of Southeast Asians; and so on. We will work through these themes through the lens of the role of women and women’s groups, examining Western tourists, governesses and wives; sex, prostitution and the control of VD; colonial-era marriage with “white guys” and the biracial children; Islam and women; and post-colonial women political leaders. We will examine these issues within the framework of the political, social, economic and cultural interactions between Britain, France, Holland, the United States of America, China, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar/Burma. In addition to reading a selection of secondary and primary materials, including poems, biographies, memoirs, and histories, students will also watch music videos and films to understand and analyze the issues. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 393. Code 3. G.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
GST 411Bodies: Sociology of the Flesh3.00
Examines the role of society in understanding and relating to biology, especially the human body. We tend to think of the body as a “given”, but in this class we will explore how the body and our relationship to it has changed dramatically over place and time. We will analyze how bodies are used as grounds for inequality, including not only those rooted in gender but also race, disability, size, and social class. This course also counts for credit toward the Gender Studies minor. Cross-listed as SOCI/GST 411.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 413Complex Identities: Global Race, Class, and Gender3.00
Examines race, class, gender, and other major aspects of social identity as intersecting phenomena, including some of their cousins: colonialism, patriarchy, marginalization, and racism. We look carefully at the ways each of these systems of power shifts and influences the others by assuming an intersectional perspective throughout the course. This course has a specifically global emphasis, looking at how seemingly fixed identities like race change radically in different parts of the globe. This course also counts for credit toward the Gender Studies minor. Cross-listed as SOCI/GST 413.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SOCI 101, GST 210, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
GST 456Feminist Theory and Action3.00
Seminar course providing a deeper look at feminist thought, building on the introduction provided in GST 150. Through readings and films, examines conversations, controversies, and connections among a range of feminist thinkers. Students explore the intersections of feminist thought and action, reading a variety of calls to action and articulating their own. Cross-listed as POLS/GST 456.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GST 150 or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 459Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering3.00
This course will explore pregnancy, childbirth, and mothering from two perspectives-the embodied experience of women and its political-social context. We will consider how women's firsthand experiences of motherhood are responses to a broader social milieu. This approach will enable us to think about a variety of philosophical themes and questions with regard to our topic including: philosophical method, embodiment, sex and gender, the origins of ethics, moral obligation, virtue, moral luck, intersubjectivity, and oppression. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 459.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
GST 460The Study of First Nations Women3.00
Exploration of the First Nations woman's social roles and lifestyles from a variety of tribal cultures in North America. Focuses on traditional and contemporary values and roles of First Nations women. Cross-listed as FNS/GST 460.
GST 489Gender Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GST 490Special Topics in Women's Studies1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in Women's Studies selected by the instructor. Course may be repeated for credit when instructor and/or topics are different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GST 499Independent Study1.00 - 3.00
Supervised independent study and/or research in Women's Studies. May be supervised by any current member of the Women's Studies faculty.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Women's Study minor, and completion of at least 3 credits in GST and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
HHP - Health and Human Performance
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HHP 100Sports Conditioning I1.00
Physical skills and stamina needed to participate in varsity sports. Not applicable toward a major or minor in Human Performance and Health Promotion. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 101Sports Conditioning II1.00
Provides skill development and conditioning necessary to participate in varsity sports. Not applicable toward a major or minor in Health and Human Performance. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 102Health and Wellness3.00
Basic knowledge and understanding of health and critical thinking that provides students with the opportunity to develop and implement a plan for reaching their optimal level of functioning physically, emotionally, socially, mentally, spiritually, environmentally and occupationally. Does not count toward a major or minor in Health and Human Performance. Note: Students with medical restrictions should contact the lab coordinator of HHP 102 before the first lab session. Physical Education majors and minors must earn a grade of C or better in HHP 102.
University Studies Requirements:
Health & Human Performance
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 105Sports Conditioning III1.00
This course will pay special attention to the physical training and conditioning necessary to participate in varsity sports. Not applicable toward a major or minor in Health and Human Performance. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 106Sports Conditioning IV1.00
Physical training and conditioning necessary to participate in varsity sports in the primary objective of this course. Not applicable toward a major or minor in Health and Human Performance. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 110Introduction to HHP Majors/Minors1.00
Summary of the catalog course schedules, careers, and professional opportunities available to the HHP majors/minors. Advisors will be assigned and a tentative four year plan will be developed. Scientific and professional organizations, professional journals, certifications, resumes and the job search process will be given consideration. Selected guest presenters will provide insight into career options.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 113Level II & Level III Swimming Certification (Beginning and Advanced Beginning)1.00
Level II covers primary skills for the beginner. Level III introduces stroke readiness.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 117Alpine Skiing1.00
Basic skills, techniques, conditioning, strategy, safety and rules of alpine skiing.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 119Skating0.50
Basic skills, techniques, conditioning, strategy, safety and rules of ice skating.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 125Basketball0.50
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy, and rules of basketball emphasizing the competencies needed in teaching.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 126Field Sports, Team Handball and Flag Football0.50
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy, and rules of team sports and team handball emphasizing the competencies needed in teaching.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 127Soccer0.50
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy, and rules of soccer emphasizing the competencies needed in teaching.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 128Softball0.50
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy, and rules of softball emphasizing the competencies needed in teaching.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 130Volleyball0.50
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy, and rules of volleyball emphasizing the competencies needed in teaching.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 133Social and Square Dance3.00
Fundamentals of various styles and techniques of movement and dance.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 141Outdoor Education Climbing1.00
This course is a basic skills of climbing that includes knowledge and skill development in the following areas: equipment and equipment checks, knots, belay technique, safety checks and climbing techniques in a variety of situations and environments.
HHP 142Paddling1.00
This course is a basic skills of paddling course that includes knowledge and skill development in the following areas: equipment and equipment checks, knots, paddling technique, safety protocol and paddling techniques in a variety of situations and environments using a variety of watercraft including canoes and kayaks.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 150Invasion, Striking and Field Activities in PE4.00
A content course addressing teaching strategies, movements, skill development and knowledge, rules and tactics of selected activities in Physical Education. Students will gain practice in planning, teaching, and assessment related to Physical Education.
Prerequisites:
HHP 110
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 151Target, Net and Wall Activities in PE4.00
A content course addressing teaching strategies, movements, skill development and knowledge, rules and tactics of selected activities in Physical Education. Students will gain practice in planning, teaching, and assessment Physical Education.
Prerequisites:
HHP 110
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 181Self Defense1.00
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy, and rules of self defense.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 182Weight Training1.00
Basic knowledge and skills of weight training; terms, resistance, techniques, programs, safety concepts, with practical application of these concepts being the primary outcome.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 185Racquetball1.00
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy, and rules of racquetball.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 186Shooting Sports:Riflery1.00
Shooting Sports: Riflery - Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy, and rules of riflery.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 187Shooting Sports: Pistols1.00
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy, and rules of pistol shooting.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 188Riding1.00
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy, and rules of riding.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 189Physical Education Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior Course.
HHP 203Group Fitness1.00
Active participation in group exercises that promote cardiovascular endurance, muscle strength and flexibility.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 204Aqua Dynamics1.00
Individual fitness through specific aquatic activities
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 213Level IV & V (Intermediate) American Red Cross Certification & Basic Water Safety1.00
Level IV covers stroke development and increases swimmer endurance. Level V involves refinement and coordination of key strokes. Also introduces basic water safety skills.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 217Curling-Broomball0.50
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy, and rules of curling and broomball for teaching.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 218Cross Country Ski-Snowshoe0.50
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy, and rules of cross country, skiing/snowshoeing for teaching.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 233Elementary School Human Performance Activities-Children's Games3.00
Various activities pertinent to elementary school children, with emphasis on teaching and class management.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 235Children's Rhythms & Tumbling3.00
Various activities pertinent to elementary school children, with emphasis on teaching and class management.
Prerequisites:
HHP 133
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 252Introduction into Sports and Exercise Medicine2.00
An introduction into the prevention and basic care of sports injuries. A theory and laboratory experience providing knowledge and understanding of the many aspects of health care for the recreational and competitive athlete.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 275Tennis-Racquetball1.00
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy and rules of tennis/racquetball emphasizing individual competencies for teaching purposes.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 276Archery0.50
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy and rules of archery emphasizing individual competencies for teaching purposes.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 277Badminton and Recreational Net Games0.50
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy and rules of badminton and recreational net games emphasizing individual competencies for teaching purposes.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 278Golf0.50
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy and rules of golf emphasizing individual competencies for teaching purposes.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 279Tennis1.00
Basic skills, techniques, safety, conditioning, strategy and rules of tennis emphasizing individual competencies for teaching purposes.
HHP 280Track and Field1.00
Theory and techniques, safety, strategy, training schedules, coaching methods, conditioning, psychology, and other aspects of all levels of track and cross country.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 282Introduction to Physical Assessment and Exercise Evaluation1.00
Basic laboratory, clinical, and field evaluation skills used in health and fitness, exercise physiology and physical education. Skills include health and risk assessment, cardiopulmonary evaluation, body composition, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and general anthrometrics. Also covers metabolic equations and an introduction to common medications encountered by exercise professionals. This is a hands-on class which prepares the student for the exercise physiology class
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 289Physical Education Elective0.50 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HHP 300Varsity Sports I1.00
Intensive study and practice of fundamentals and team play in varsity sports. Will not count toward Health and Human Performance major or minor. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 301Varsity Sports II1.00
Skill,strategy,conditioning refinement for team play in varsity sports. Not applicable toward a major or minor in Health and Human Performance. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 304Principles of Aqua-Dynamics2.00
Practical applications of the principles of directing aerobic activities, including components of fitness, physiological-psychological benefits of aerobic activity, training methods and teaching techniques.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 305Varsity Sports III1.00
Advanced skill/strategy refinement for team play in varsity sports. Not applicable toward a major or minor in Health and Human Performance. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 306Varsity Sports IV1.00
Advanced preparation in conditioning/skills/strategies for participation in varsity sports. Not applicable toward a major or minor in Health and Human Performance. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 312Aquatic Safety1.00
Provides knowledge and skill regarding patron safety and enjoyment in and around aquatic facilities. Course content and activities prepare participants to recognize and respond quickly and effectively to aquatic emergencies. A swimming and diving pretest is required. Successful completion of this course and requirements established by the American Red Cross will provide the participant with a certificate for Lifeguarding or Shallow Water Attendant.
Prerequisites:
HLTH 158 is prerequisite for enrolling in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 313Level VI,VII Advanced Swimming (ARC) and Emergency Water Safety1.00
Refining strokes to enable swimming efficiency and long-distance swimming. Students also engage in a variety of aquatic activities and water safety techniques.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 314Scuba2.00
Classroom work and water training required for taking open-water dive.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 317Advanced Winter Sports1.00
Instruction and participation in advanced levels of winter sport activities.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 321Adapted Human Performance (PE)2.00
Activity selection, curricular development and program implementation in teaching exceptional/special needs students. Includes hands-on intervention with exceptional/special needs students.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior standing or Instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HHP 332Motor Learning3.00
Perceptual and motor learning concepts associated with skill development.
Prerequisites:
Completion of HLTH 264 and HLTH 265, or BIOL 270 and 280 are prerequisite for enrolling in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 335Sports Medicine Laboratory I3.00
In depth study of prevention, evaluation, care, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries pertaining to physical activity. Special emphasis on evaluation and rehabilitation of specific body regions in conjunction with the healing process.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HHP 252.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 336Sports Medicine Laboratory II3.00
Continuation course in prevention, evaluation, care and treatment of injuries as they pertain to physical activity. Special emphasis on the role of evaluation and the use of physical agents in conjunction with the healing process.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HHP 335.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 337Practicum in HHP 102 Lab1.00 - 2.00
This course is designed to allow the student to apply knowledge and skills acquired in prior coursework by working with apparently healthy adults in an applied setting.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HHP 282, HHP 363, and HLTH 264 and HLTH 265, or BIOL 270 and BIOL 280.
HHP 339Methods and Curriculum In Secondary Physical Education3.00
Teaching methods, materials and fundamental principles in curriculum development for secondary physical educators. A passing score on the PPST is required to enroll in this course.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed HHP110 and having passed the PPST.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 340Organization and Administration of Human Performance, Health & Athletics3.00
Techniques, procedures, and principles of organizing and administering human performance, allied health and athletic programs. Emphasizes administrative structure, legal liability, and facilities management.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior standing, and completion of 20 credits in major area.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 352Principles of Athletic Training2.00
Advanced investigation into the care and prevention of injuries that occur with physical activity. A sports medicine approach into the areas of recognition, management, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries related to athletic, recreational and occupational activity.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HHP 252.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 362Kinesiology3.00
Review of materials associated with basic muscle identification, origin, insertion, and muscle function. Students will learn functional concepts associated with agonist and antagonist, the primary lever systems, how the upper and lower chains of the body assist with function from birth to the older age, and how basic biomechanics of daily function assists with or limits everyday activities and overall health. Virtual lab style activities are used to enhance the learning environment and link knowledge to practical application of skills.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HLTH 264, HLTH 265 or BIOL 270 and BIOL 280.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 363Exercise Physiology3.00
Introductory lecture and laboratory course examining the acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise. The lecture portion covers the sub-cellular and metabolic responses to exercise, followed by the systemic responses (neuromuscular, endocrine, cardiopulmonary) as well as body composition, environmental factors, gender, aging and training principles. The laboratory section allows students to accent the lecture portion with hands-on laboratory experiences.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HHP 282 and HLTH 264 and HLTH 265 or BIOL 270 and BIOL 280.
HHP 372Consumer Health2.00
Principles of consumerism are discussed and analyzed with regard to health care products and interventions.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 376Advanced Individual Sports1.00 - 6.00
Instruction and participation in advanced levels of individual and dual sports.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 389Physical Education Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HHP 403Health Coach3.00
The content covered in this course will address a wide spectrum of health and behavioral concepts with focus areas in: behavioral science, nutrition, kinesiology, exercise science, screening and fitness assessments, client program design, and legal and ethical concerns related to allied health professions. Special consideration for children and seniors will be covered along with other special needs populations. Students will understand how to design and coach both healthy populations and special needs populations through nutritional and fitness behavioral change and exercise programming. Students will gain the knowledge required of an entry level health coach and will also be eligible to sit for an approved certification upon completion.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of HHP 282, HHP 362, HLTH 366, or consent of Instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 412Lifeguard Training Instructor1.00
American Red Cross program to qualify an individual to teach the American Red Cross Water Safety course.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 413Water Safety Instructor (WSI)2.00
American Red Cross program to qualify an individual to teach the ARC Swimming courses.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 414Scuba-Open Water Certification2.00
Open water dive requirements for certification.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HHP 314 or its equivalent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 417Programs of Certification in Winter Sports Activities-Instructor's Training-Skiing2.00
Program of certification by National Organization for Winter Sports.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 421Assessment of the Exceptional Child in Human Performance (PE)2.00
Federal and state laws pertaining to the education of exceptional/special needs students, knowledge of the major characteristics of the disability areas, process for referral, placement and programming, and mainstreaming.
Prerequisites:
Co-requisite for taking this course is HHP 422.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HHP 422Adaptive Human Performance (PE) Fieldwork1.00 - 8.00
Work experience with exceptional/special needs individuals. Each credit equals approximately 36 hours of on-the-job experience outside the university.
Prerequisites:
Corequisite for taking this course is enrollment in HHP 421.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HHP 423Adaptive Aquatics0.50
Work experience with exceptional/special needs individuals in an aquatic environment. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 424Coaching Students with Special Needs1.00 - 4.00
Theory, principles and practical application of coaching sports for exceptional/special needs students. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course. On demand.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 435Theories of Human Performance for the Elementary School3.00
(For Human Performance majors.) Theory and practice of the various activities in the elementary human performance program as well as curriculum development. School observation required.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior class standing and admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HHP 437Practicum in Health1.00 - 16.00
Experience under direct supervision in teaching human performance activities.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 438Measurement and Evaluation for Human Performance2.00
Introduction to the field of measurement, evaluation and research in human performance. Students are required to complete an independent research project related to their intended profession. Basics of a research proposal, Institutional Review Board and power point presentations are covered.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior class standing in HHP major.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HHP 458Certification/Certificate Preparation1.00 - 12.00
Students are given mentoring towards sitting for credential: Certificate or Certification that enhances their professional pursuits. Assistance with study guides, preparatory courses such as webinars will be required for completion of this course. Instructor consent required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 460Cardiovascular Diagnostics3.00
Introductory survey of theoretical considerations and practical applications of electrocardiography and other cardiac interventions.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HHP 336 (can be concurrent).
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HHP 463Practicum in Fitness Lab1.00 - 2.00
Practical and professional application relevant to organization, equipment maintenance, test administration, and interpretation of fitness programs in corporate. community, school settings.
HHP 471Senior Seminar: Community Health Promotion3.00
Development, implementation, and administration of community health promotion programs. Instructor consent is required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 489Physical Education Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HHP 490Independent Study1.00 - 6.00
Intensive investigation of various phases, trends and/or programs in health or human performance. Each student presents a thorough paper on a selected phase, trend or problem in human performance.
Prerequisites:
Junior Class Standing is a prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 491Fieldwork1.00 - 12.00
Varied opportunities to work in field settings. Each credit equals approximately 36 hours of on-the-job experience outside the university. Normally open to juniors and seniors. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course. Instructor consent is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 492Experiential Learning1.00 - 12.00
Credit for certain non-classroom experiences on campus. Normally open to juniors and seniors. Credit for experience is normally sought prior to its occurrence. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course. Instructor consent is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 493Special/Student Initiated Seminar1.00 - 6.00
Specially designed seminar or student-initiated seminar when there is sufficient student interest.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 494Workshop1.00 - 8.00
Short-term, activity/health oriented course in a specialized area. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course. Instructor consent is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 495Current Topics Seminar1.00 - 12.00
Advanced seminar on major contemporary developments in the area of human performance and athletics.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 496Internship10.00 - 20.00
On-the-job experience with community agencies to provide students with realistic opportunities to apply their skills to practical problems. A student must work at a site a minimum of 450 hours to receive internship credit. Field Experiences Director's consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HHP 497Senior Capstone Experience0.00
Required culminating senior year project that integrates and synthesizes the student's coursework (theories, concepts, skill competencies) into a formal project and experience. This experience is to be negotiated with the student's major advisor and instructor for final consent and approval prior to the student's last semester of coursework before graduation. Senior capstone is paired with another course in the major. See Health and Human Performance major descriptions for paired courses in the Exercise Science program. Student must participate in a public presentation; i.e., Poster Session, Power Point presentation. Pass-Fail. Arranged. Instructor Consent is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
HHPED - Health and Human Performance Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HHPED 343Physical Education Methods/Curriculum for Classroom Teachers3.00
Content areas in human performance for the elementary, middle and secondary schools including rhythms, stunts and tumbling, simple games, fitness and manipulative activities. Teaching methods, instructional materials and evaluation techniques for each content area in a well-balanced integrated activity based curriculum for classroom teachers. Mini-teaching in the various areas emphasized. Admissions to the Teacher Education Program. S16, S17.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior class standing and admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
HHPED 344Health Methods/Curriculum for Classroom Teachers3.00
Content areas in health education for the elementary, middle and secondary schools, including personal health, disease, mental health, nutrition, safety and first aid, drugs, sexuality, consumer health, community health, and environmental health. Teaching methods, instructional materials and evaluation techniques for each content area in a comprehensive school health education program. Students develop unit and lesson plans for the selected grade levels. Opportunities provided for practice teaching. Admissions to the Teacher Education Program. F15, F 16.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior class standing and admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Summer Terms
 
HIST - History
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HIST 104The History of Human Origins3.00
A history of human origins from the fish who crawled out of the sea to early hominids to the peopling of the continents. Uses fossil, archaeological, experimental archaeological, linguistic, oral narrative and genetic evidence. Honors the origin narratives of diverse peoples. All religious views welcome. Many films. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST 104. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 111Modern World History3.00
Focuses on themes rather than chronology. Students follow the growing globalization of the world through the study of themes like nationalism, industrialization, imperialism, capitalism, decolonization, technologies, gender, race, everyday lives, world systems, migration and Diaspora. Will employ analysis of primary documents, photographs, maps, music, films or other sources of history and build skills of effective writing, clear presentations, use of convincing evidence, increasing geographic literacy and placing the history of specific regions in a global context. Aims to provide an introduction to the discipline of history and its methods. Emphasis on learning to think globally. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 112The Ancient Mediterranean World3.00
General-education-level course introducing students to the basic outlines of the history of the Mediterranean region -- including Greece, Rome, Spain, northern Africa, and Palestine -- from the earliest times to the Middle Ages. While investigating some key events and stories from these places and times, students learn to critically evaluate the ways these stories are re-told in our time, using actual texts and documents from the times in comparison to books and movies about those times from our day. Code 1
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 113Soccer and identity: A Global History3.00
This course focuses on the social, cultural and political impact of soccer across the world. It tackles issues of racial, ethnic, class and geographic identities as well as gender dynamics through an examination of the development of soccer, and its iconic rivalries. It traces the history and development of the game in various parts of the world – Asia, Africa, North America, South America and Europe. Students engage in critical analysis of a range of sources: academic and popular non-fiction books; scholarly journal articles; newspaper and magazine articles; fan literature (blogs, fanzines, FB groups etc); and audio-visual materials (films, documentaries and matches). Students learn how to use these verifiable historical evidence to construct reasoned interpretations of the human past. In discussion sessions and other classroom activities, students are encouraged to explore how interpretations of the past can be applied to address contemporary issues and problems.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 115World Religions3.00
A course on the history or world religions, some great and some small: Abrahamic, Dharmic, Indigenous faiths and religions of the Tao. The course stresses links between faiths and their historic origins. All faiths are equally respected. It is NOT a debate about which faith is true or better than another. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 119Kings, Concubines, Thinkers, Farmers in East Asia3.00
China, Japan and Korea make up one of the fastest growing regions today. We buy all sorts of stuff made in China; text on our Samsung phones; drive our Hondas, Toyotas, and Hyundais; listen to K-pop; watch Jackie Chan and cheered on Yao Ming; read manga comics and watch anime; consume dim sum and chow mein, ramen and sushi, kimchi and bibimbop. This course seeks to understand what makes these societies tick; societies that share many similarities but are continually asserting their unique linguistic, cultural and political identities. We reach back to the pre-modern period to examine the lives of the elite (emperors, princes, generals, poets, philosophers) and everyday folks (soldiers and samurais, farmers, traders, monks, concubines). The course will use a diverse range of sources, from scholarly articles and memoirs to documentaries, movies and music videos. The course centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, presentations, critical thinking, as well as short- and medium-length essays. It introduces students to the study and discipline of history. Code 3
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 120Conquest and Resistance in Modern Asia3.00
This course examines the impact of one of the key dynamics of late modern history in Asia: colonialism. It takes a comparative look at how imperialism was experienced by the invading power and the colonized people in traditionally lesser-studied regions of the world. We look at a number of case studies of Western and Japanese colonialism from the 19th century onwards, including – (1) the Spanish and the US in the Philippines (2) the British experience in Asia (primarily India but also Burma); (3) the French in Vietnam; (4) The Dutch experience in Indonesia; and finally, (5) the Japanese in China, Taiwan, and Korea, and later during WWII, in Southeast Asia. (Other case studies may also be used.) We examine the social, economic, cultural, political, and personal impact of imperialism on both the metropole and the colony. We will read memoirs, watch music videos and films, and discuss issues such as the nuts and bolts of colonial rule, the role of women, attitudes towards race and identity, indigenous pursuit of modernity, and nationalism among others. Emphasis on learning to think globally and provides University Studies students and majors with an introduction to historical thinking. Code 3
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 125Modern Latin America3.00
An examination of issues of development and underdevelopment using Latin America as a case study. Students will explore a variety of theories of underdevelopment and use Latin American History to weigh the merits of these various theories. Code 2
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 130Early-Modern Europe/From Medieval to Early-Modern Europe3.00
An introductory course on the idea of Europe’s gradual emergence from the “Middle Ages” into the “Modern” era. Through focus on a few selected topics like peasants’ lives, the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, or the emergence of capitalism, students will gain familiarity with some of the key stories of the early-modern European past, while also developing skill in the basic methods and purposes of historical inquiry. Course activities will focus on close reading of historical documents, discussion, essay writing, and formal oral argument. Code 1
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 131Modern Europe 1789 to Present3.00
An introductory course on Europe's tumultuous "modern" era, from the French Revolution to the present. Focus on a few key topics, like the Liberal revolutions, industrialization, the World Wars, Nazism and totalitarianism, or the efforts to create a European Union, will allow students both to delve deeply into particular episodes of European history and at the same time to develop skill in the basic methods and purposes of historical inquiry. Course activities will focus on close readings of historical documents, discussion, essay writing, and formal oral argument. Code 1
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 151History of the United States Through 18773.00
Examination of a series of questions and controversies in United States history from the European conquest to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Explores issues such as the nature of the U.S. Constitution, immigration and industrialization, slavery and emancipation. Provides general education students and majors with an introduction to historical thinking.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 152The United States Since 18773.00
Examination of a series of questions and controversies in United States history from the late 19th Century through the present. Explores such issues as labor and social class, race and civil rights, gender and women's rights, the U.S. as global superpower, the Great Depression and social reform. Provides general education students and majors with an introduction to historical thinking.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 154African-American Voices3.00
Explores the African-American experience over the past two centuries with an emphasis on social and political discourse. The ideas of major political, literary, cultural and intellectual figures, as well as the content of black folk and popular culture, will be examined in a social and historical context. Authors include Douglass, DuBois, Hurston, Garvey, King, Malcolm X, and bell hooks. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 181The Muslim World3.00
Survey-level course introduces students to a variety of topics about the Muslim world from multidisciplinary perspectives. The time and life of the prophet Muhammad, the rise of great Islamic empires, Islam and women, the spread of Islam in America and the explosion of Islamic resurgence and extremism are all topics for consideration. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 189History Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
HIST 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
HIST 256Introduction to Historical Research and Writing-History of Wisconsin3.00
Introduction to basic methods of research and writing in the discipline of history using the History of Wisconsin as a subject matter. Required of all students majoring or minoring in History. Should ordinarily be taken in the sophomore year. Enrollment limited to students majoring or minoring in History or Social Studies, or by permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 264War and Peace in Bosnia3.00
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of various theories of the causes of conflict and conflict resolution within the specific historical context of the disintegration of Yugoslavia during the 1990s, and particularly the Bosnian was of 1992-95. Using those historical events and the questions they raise as a test-case, the course will try to come to some general conclusions about the nature and causes of ethnic conflict and how it differs from interstate conflict; the reasons for and methods of international intervention, including negotiation, arbitration, adjudication, and mediation; the factors that contribute to the success or failure of various methods of intervention and conflict resolution; the challenges involved in re-building societies after war; and the long-term prospects for fostering peace, security, justice, and human rights through such efforts. Code 1. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
HIST 266War and Peace in Northern Ireland3.00
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of various theories of the causes of conflict and conflict resolution within the general historical context of the rise and demise of the British Empire, and particularly the Northern Ireland question. Using those historical events and the questions they raise as a test-case, the course will try to come to some general conclusions about the nature and causes of ethnic conflict and how it differs from interstate conflict; the reasons for and methods of international intervention, including negotiation, arbitration, adjudication, and mediation; the factors that contribute to the success or failure of various methods of intervention and conflict resolution; the challenges involved in re-building societies after prolonged civil war; and the long-term prospects for fostering peace, security, justice, and human rights through such efforts. Code 1. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
HIST 289History Elective1.00 - 14.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the Social Inquiry faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different. (Regular ongoing topics: War and Peace in Bosnia.) Code will depend on the specific program.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 311The Working Class and the Dream of Equality in Europe3.00
Upper-division seminar in the history of radical egalitarian movements in the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing on Europe. Tracing the evolution of the idea of Equality from the French Revolution, Marxist socialism, Soviet communism, to the minority and student revolts of the 1960s, the course will seek to understand this history both as a radical intellectual critique of ordinary working people seeking immediate political and economic benefits. Emphasis will be communication their opinions in formal essays and debates. Code 1
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 314Nationalism and Nationalist Movements3.00
Upper-division seminar on the phenomenon of nationalism and its roles in the history of modern Europe and the modern world. One of the two main foci is on in-depth examination of key nationalist movements in European history like the Irish, German, and Servian. These case studies are paired with an examination of the evolution of Western social scientists; attempts to understand the nature of the phenomenon, from political-intellectual to sociological and anthropological perspectives. Primary emphasis will be placed on students' developing the ability to understand and use academic theories in explaining actual historical events. Code 1. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 317Men and Women in Nazi Germany3.00
In this upper-division examination of the nature of Nazi society and Fascism more generally, the central focus will be on gender--the images of and attitudes towards masculinity and femininity, and alternative sexualities, in the Third Reich. Changes in the role afforded to men and women, and in beliefs about what it means to be male and female, were at the very center of the revolutionary changes that constituted the shift to the "Modern Era." In seeking to understand Fascist attitudes toward gender, therefore, the course is seeking to understand not some peripheral aspect of Nazi society, but its very core, the very essence of modern democracy and its nemesis, Fascism. Much attention will be focused on developing skill in understanding and interpreting films and other visual artifacts and how they reveal ideals and assumptions about gender. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 317. Code 1. G.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 318The Holocaust in Modern Memory3.00
The Holocaust, which ended more than 70 years ago, has never been more present than it is today, exercising a hold on the imagination, especially in the United States and Western Europe, more powerful even than in the immediate aftermath of the war. But why should that be true? Why is it that the social memory of this particular event should have such power over generations so far removed in both time and space--particularly when other episodes of genocidal violence, similar in scale and historical importance--play almost no role in our collective memories and consciousness? This upper-division seminar focuses attention on those questions by examining the history of the memory of the Holocaust: how it is remembered; what is remembered and what is forgotten; how the memories are shaped; and to what uses they are put. Close readings of survivor memoirs and historical interpretations, and visual analyses of films and monuments will help students learn to critique the ways in which all "history" is socially constructed. Code 1. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 321The Sixties3.00
Examines the interlocking series of social and political crises that erupted in the United States in the 1960s. Topics include: civil rights and black power, urban unrest, the Vietnam War and the anti-war movement, the youth rebellion, the rebirth of feminism, and the conservative backlash. Studies the underlying causes of upheaval as well as the decade's legacy. The course emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of primary historical sources.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 322The Construction of Gender in the United States3.00
An examination of gender and sexual identities and roles in the United States from colonial times through the present. Explores the evolution of these roles and identities and the social, economic, and political forces that shape them. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 322. G.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 324First Nations Wisconsin History3.00
History of the native peoples of Wisconsin from prehistoric times to the present. Major emphasis on the six federally recognized tribes in Wisconsin. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 324.
HIST 330Envisioning World History3.00
An exploration of different approaches to the study of World History. Students will look at major issues and controversies in the field of World History and delve into these issues and controversies through an examination of concrete case studies. Normally taken in the junior year. Required for all students majoring or minoring in History.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 333The History of Indigenous Peoples3.00
A course on a global history of Indigenous Peoples which will explore the history of conquered and marginalized societies in a world systems context. The course examines their loss of economic resources, environmental security, cultural, linguistic and political sovereignty and their strategies for survival and reemergence as re-empowered peoples. Examples from many regions of the world with many films. Examples may change but the learning goals remain the same. Cross-listed as ANTH/FNS/HIST 333. Code 4. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
HIST 363Civil War and Reconstruction3.00
Examination of the American Civil War and its aftermath emphasizing social and political history. Organized around three main questions: Why did civil war erupt in the United States in 1861? What effect did the wartime experience have on American society? What was at stake in the struggles of the Reconstruction period?
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica (located in present-day Mexico, Guatemala, and neighboring areas), both past and present, and their transformations and influence across time and borders. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 2.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 369The Shadow Of Mexican Revolution3.00
Examines the revolution of 1910-1920 and its legacy with particular emphasis upon the ways in which the culture, politics, and society of twentieth-century Mexico evolved in the revolution's shadow. Particular attention is paid to the interrelated development of the state and the nation in modern Mexico. Includes significant attention to art and literature as historical sources. Code 4.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 385Samurai: A History of Japan3.00
This upper-division course traces the history of Japan through the development of the samurai as a distinct social group over the last millennium. We will focus on the formation of a distinctive Japanese culture and identity through its initial interaction with cultures inhabiting present-day Korea and China; its borrowing and adaptation of political, economic, social, linguistic, religious and educational elements from China and Korea; and the repeated opening and closing of Japan to the outside world over the course of several centuries. We will also look at Japan’s contact with the West, beginning with Dutch traders, the encounter with Commodore Perry’s US naval fleet of Black Ships, and the conflict with the Allies (principally the US) during WWII. We will examine these issues through the lens of samurai culture: exploring the myths and reality of samurais as warriors and bureaucrats, their professional and family lives, and their symbolic meaning within Japanese and popular culture; and so on. We will also consider whether this samurai/Japanese ethos is culturally and geographically specific, or transferable. This seminar-style course uses first person accounts; tales, fables and histories; scholarly articles; and films (not just the great Kurosawa epics, but also lesser-known accounts by Mizoguchi Kenji, Inagaki Hiroshi, Jim Jarmusch, Hirayama, Oshima, Yamada and others). Code 3
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 389History Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 393Women, Colonialism, and Nationalism in Modern Southeast Asia3.00
This upper-division seminar examines the role women played in Southeast Asian history from the 19th century till the present, specifically as the region confronted the challenges of colonialism and post-colonial nation-building. Among key issues covered are (1) the encounter between Western guns and local political systems; (2) race and racism (or, why the other group is always a barbarian); (3) how Southeast Asia became “modern”; (4) decolonization and/or revolution; (4) political, economic and religious challenges in post-colonial nationalism; (5) the intimate and everyday lives of Southeast Asians; and so on. We will work through these themes through the lens of the role of women and women’s groups, examining Western tourists, governesses and wives; sex, prostitution and the control of VD; colonial-era marriage with “white guys” and the biracial children; Islam and women; and post-colonial women political leaders. We will examine these issues within the framework of the political, social, economic and cultural interactions between Britain, France, Holland, the United States of America, China, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar/Burma. In addition to reading a selection of secondary and primary materials, including poems, biographies, memoirs, and histories, students will also watch music videos and films to understand and analyze the issues. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 393. Code 3. G.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 394Interrogating the Vietnam War: A History of Modern Vietnam (1885-1975)3.00
When we think of the Vietnam War, we think of a critical period in 20th century American history: the swinging 60s, napalm bombs, mysterious Viet Cong fighters, campus protests, the peace movement, and America’s defeat. We may even think of Tom Cruise in Born on the Fourth of July, or that famous picture of desperate people climbing up the ladder to a helicopter on the roof of the US embassy. But there is another side to the war: the “Vietnam” side. This course explores the conflict from that other side. To understand why the Vietnamese took up arms, we examine roughly a century of history beginning with the complete loss of independence to the French in the 1880s and ending with the reunification of the country in 1975. We explore why the Vietnamese resented the French, how young Vietnamese broke with their centuries-long traditions and radicalized, how women found opportunities in a new modernity, how Ho Chi Minh made several efforts to ally with America (and why the US said “No”), and how, ultimately, the US got drawn into a war it had little understanding of. Along the way, we will explore the changing nature of what it means to be Vietnamese on a personal, social and national level, as Vietnamese of different ethnic, class, gender and educational groups, from various geographic areas, confront new forces that re-shape their identities. We will read a mixture of primary and secondary materials, including films, memoirs, recollections, newspaper articles and autobiographies by Vietnamese participants. Code 3. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 395Modern India: From Gandhi to Slumdog Millionaire3.00
This course examines the impact of colonialism on the Indian subcontinent and on the formation of the modern India. We will also explore contemporary post-colonial themes such as the urbanization of India, the question of Indian-ness in the face of a growing and prosperous global Indian diaspora (or, why there is an Indian restaurant in just about any town in the US). This course is mainly conducted as a seminar in which students take the lead in presenting and discussing the material. The aim is not just to foster a higher level of critical reading, writing, thinking and speaking, but to also refine professional work habits. Code 3. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 489History Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HIST 490Public History Internship3.00
A structured field experience. Students provide 150 hours of museum, archival, or other public history work to a local organization. Students receive training and experience under the supervision of a public history professional. Permission of a supervising faculty member required. See the History Program coordinator for information. No Code
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 495Special and Student Initiated Seminar1.00 - 3.00
This department offers a specially designed seminar or student-initiated seminar when interest warrants. In certain circumstances this course can be adapted to serve as the capstone experience. For further information see Special or Student-Initiated Seminar in the index of this catalog. Code will depend on topic selected.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 496Historiographical Research Theories and Methodologies3.00
Advanced seminar in current methodological and historiographical debates and trends in the historical profession. Introduces students both to the ways in which the writing of history has evolved and changed over time, and to the wide variety of theories and methods that dominate approaches to historical research and writing today. Through focused readings and discussions, students learn to recognize and critically evaluate the underlying assumptions, starting questions, methodologies and theoretical models at work in some of the most important historical debates of the past few decades. Individual historiographical research projects serve as the first step toward the students' primary research for their senior theses in HIST 497. Required of all History majors, and ordinarily taken in the fall of a student’s senior year.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 6 credits of History at the 300-level or above, or with instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 497Senior Thesis3.00
Guided research on a selected historical topic resulting in a thesis paper. Working closely with history faculty, students move beyond engagement with the existing secondary literature on their topic to conduct their own primary research and arrive at their own findings and argument. Individual work in cooperation with a faculty thesis advisor will be balanced with collaborative discussions among all students writing theses. The capstone will be a mini-conference in which each student presents her or his research findings to peers and guests.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HIST 496.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 498Study Abroad1.00 - 5.00
Field trips designed to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the instructor. With consent of the department chair and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Code depends on region visited.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 499Independent Study1.00 - 3.00
For advanced students majoring or minoring in History who have shown themselves capable of independent work. Each student is directed by a faculty member chosen by the student. Prerequisite: Approval of the department chair. Code will depend on topic selected.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
HLTH - Health
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HLTH 158Responding To Emergencies and Safety Education2.00
Provides the knowledge and skills necessary in an emergency to help sustain life and minimize pain and the consequences of injury or sudden illness until medical help arrives. Emphasis also given to the prevention of injuries and illness, with a focus on personal health and safety. American Red Cross certification for CPR and Advanced First Aid will be awarded at the successful completion of the American Red Cross requirements.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HLTH 160Introduction to Health Science and Terminology2.00
Interdisciplinary review of content areas of health and allied health terminology.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HLTH 189Health Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HLTH 264Human Structure & Function3.00
Applied physiological and applied anatomical facts and concepts are reviewed, including basic principles, chemistry, the cell, tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, nervous, and muscular systems. A virtual laboratory is used to link classroom activities and lectures to anatomical examples and functional application of knowledge.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite or corequisite for enrolling in this course is HHP 110.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HLTH 265Human Structure & Function3.00
Applied physiological and applied anatomical facts and concepts are reviewed, including the blood, endocrine, cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, lymphatic, and urinary systems, immunity, water, and acid-base balance. A virtual laboratory is used to link classroom activities and lectures to anatomical examples and functional application of knowledge.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite or corequisite for enrolling in this course is HHP 110.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HLTH 267Introduction to Mental Health and Stress Management3.00
Exploration of the mind-body link in mental health and individual wellness. Subject areas include emotional well-being, mental illness, life crises, stress, and healthy stress management.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HLTH 289Health Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HLTH 300Maternal Child Health3.00
Public health issues affecting the health and well-being of women, children, and families. A multidisciplinary perspective that integrates the demographic, epidemiological, economic, behavioral, biological, social, cultural and environmental aspects.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HLTH 301Infant Health and Development3.00
Applications of the seven dimensions of Health and Wellness (e.g, physical, intellectual, emotional, social, economic and environmental) to infancy. Students explore the foundations of infant health and development. Covers common infant health problems.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HLTH 366Principles Of Nutrition3.00
Lecture-discussion course covering the basics of human nutrition including the macro and micro nutrients, the role of nutrition in health, weight loss and weight gain practices, erogenic aids and supplements. Also addresses nutrition through the lifespan and global implications. Students required to complete a comprehensive research paper.
Prerequisites:
Completion of HLTH 264 and 265, or BIOL 270 and 280 are prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HLTH 367Human Sexuality3.00
Covers the biological, sociological, and psychological dimensions of human sexuality. Special emphasis on the education aspects.
Prerequisites:
Completion of HLTH 264 and 265, or BIOL 270 and 280 are prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HLTH 368Drugs, Health and Human Behavior3.00
Current, accurate and documented information about drugs and their use and abuse. Attention will be given to understanding drug abuse, family, prevention, intervention, treatment, and drug-specific information.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HLTH 264, HLTH 265 or BIOL 270 and BIOL 280.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HLTH 389Health Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HLTH 400Substance Abuse Counseling3.00
This course reviews key concepts used in substance abuse treatment from both a historical and current perspective, including theoretical models of understanding and treating chemically dependent clients. Various screening and assessment tools, drug history, and interviewing skills are reviewed to help the student assess the severity of addiction and develop an initial treatment plan. Treatment settings and interventions commonly used with chemically dependent clients are also reviewed from different theoretical orientations. The concept of comorbidity and the interface between substances and psychopathology are closely examined. Additionally, substance use is examined as it relates to issues of diversity.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HLTH 469Pathophysiology of Disease\Prevention and Control3.00
Introductory course of basic pathophysiology including epidemiological basics, infectious and non-infectious diseases, systemic responses, and an in-depth study of the leading causes of death in the United States and Canada (coronary heart disease, cancer, pulmonary disease), as well as common disorders (muscular, skeletal, neurological, gastrointestinal, urological and reproductive systems.) Students are required to complete a comprehensive research paper.
Prerequisites:
Completion of HLTH 264 and 265, or BIOL 270 and 280 are prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HLTH 470Community and Environmental Health3.00
Survey of health and environmental issues as they relate to the global community. The organizations, resources and personnel involved in promotion and maintenance of the health of a community. Also examines health education theories as they relate to creating a professional health promotion plan.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for enrolling in this course is Junior Standing or Instructor Consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HLTH 472Epidemiology3.00
The design and content of this course is specific to students seeking careers in public health, community health, allied health, or other professions that require an understanding of the bacteria and viruses in our community that can lead to disease and other ailments. Epidemiology is a unique branch of the public health perspective that strives towards the prevention of disease. This course will outline how microbes play a significant role in our daily lives as agents of infectious disease, how they are a major public health concern, and how certain microbes are necessary for the sustenance of life on earth.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior standing or Instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
HLTH 489Health Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
HLTH 495Healthy Families3.00
Applications of the seven dimensions of Health and Wellness (physical, intellectual, emotional, social, vocational, economic and environmental) to families. The study of the ecological approach to family functioning. Includes field experience in programs serving families.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
HWM - Health & Wellness Management
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HWM 300Introduction to Human Health3.00
Designed to provide students with general background knowledge on many of the issues impacting our health today. Topics of study will include issues in mental, physical and social health such as stress, nutrition and fitness, alcohol, tobacco and other drugs, relationships and sexuality and diseases and disorders. An introduction to behavior change theories and the factors contributing to overall wellness will also be included.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed BIOL 115.
HWM 305The Wellness Profession3.00
This course explores the definition of health, health promotion and holistic wellness. You will learn the professional role and personal commitment required to implement life-style wellness programs. The course includes an overview of the history and philosophy contributing to the success of wellness and health promotion professionals. You will be introduced to experiential and self learning of a personal wellness program that facilitates improved health in the seven-dimensions including: Social, Physical, Emotional, Career, Intellectual, Environmental and Spiritual.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed PSYC 101.
HWM 310Changes Across the Life Span3.00
This course explores research and theory regarding the nature and processes of human development from early adulthood through old age and death. Key topics include biological theories of aging; the changing body; disorders of the brain, personality development; changing memory and thinking skills; relationship issues, careers and retirement, and death/dying.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed BIOL 115.
HWM 315Workplace Wellness Program Management3.00
This course examines the tenets of developing a successful worksite wellness program, introducing key concepts, resources and tools. Students will be introduced to worksite wellness, working with management, creating wellness teams, collecting data, strategic planning, incentives, budgets, legal issues, and creating supportive environments.
HWM 320Health and Medical Terminology3.00
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the basic terminology. Since health care uses a unique blend of prefixes, suffixes and terms related to both preventative and clinical care, it is important that the wellness profession has the knowledge and abilities to decipher this information.
HWM 325Health Literacy3.00
This course will explore the current understandings and work in health literacy research, advocacy, and outreach efforts across the various health education and related fields. It will include readings, discussions, and competencies in evaluation health information for quality and credibility; locating health information and determining quality resources; identifying and assessing population health literacy; and understanding the networks of agencies working in the health settings to address literacy in the health field.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is PSYC 101
HWM 335Worksite Health Environment3.00
This course examines the workplace environment’s influence on daily health decisions and focuses on practical, contextual levers of behavioral change. Novel insights from the fields of behavioral economics and consumer marketing will be reviewed to help students understand the cognitive barriers to health behavior change and the environmental “nudges” that can be leveraged to overcome these barriers at work. Students will explore environmental assessment tools, active design principles,workplace policies, supportive research and real world examples.
HWM 345Physical Activity and Nutrition for Wellness Managers3.00
This course presents professional recommendations and guidelines for physical activity and nutrition. Students will design workplace strategies that will meet recommendations and guidelines to support employees.
Prerequisites:
Having completed BIOL 115, 123, 130, or 270/280 is prerequisite for taking this course.
HWM 350Research Statistics for Wellness Managers3.00
This course is designed to familiarize students with research nomenclature, procedures for the design and evaluation of research, and interpretation of statistical analysis in the health field. This course will also provide the tools for critically evaluating the validity of health research.
HWM 360Stress and Dependencies and Addictions3.00
This course examines common behavioral strategies with regard to stress and its management and the use of alternative remedies for physical and emotional dependencies and addictions.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed BIOL 115 and PSYC 101.
HWM 370Understand and Effecting Health Behavior Change3.00
This course provides the basic knowledge of foundational change theories, including the Transtheoretical Stages of Change model, in order to help students understand how health behavior change happens. Included in the course is a self-reflection on personal wellness and strategies for implementing health behavior change.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed PSYC 101 and HWM 300.
HWM 385Marketing and Communication for Wellness Managers3.00
Students will develop basic marketing and promotional skills, grounded in the disciplines of social marketing, health communication and business marketing that address consumer health "needs" and customer "wants". Students will be able to assess market opportunities in wellness services, programs and facilities, and create marketing strategies and tactics. Emphases will be placed on best practices for behavior change, instead of cost savings for employers, improved customer/employee participation and/or revenues for wellness programs, services and facilities.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite is HWM 325.
HWM 399Special Topics in Health and Wellness Management3.00
HWM 405Survey of Information Technology in Wellness3.00
This course is designed to provide students with: 1) An overview of various information technology products and mediums impacting the wellness industry, such as (but not limited to) web portals, online health risk assessments, interactive health tools, trackers, videos/podcasts, telephone and digital health coaching, online challenges, social networking, electronic medical records, personal health records, electronic health (eHealth), mobile health (mHealth), mobile applications, and portable tracking devices (e.g., pedometers, glucose monitors, etc.) 2) The information and resources needed to assess, create, and/or select appropriate technologies and vendors.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite is HWM 325, HWM 335 and HWM 385 (previously HWM 420, 380 & 390)
HWM 430Population Health for Wellness Managers3.00
This course introduces the evolution of health problems and services and will examine the methods designed to capture a community and workplace health profile. The participant will apply concepts involved in measuring and understanding the health of individuals and populations in order to enhance quality of life. The key social determinants of wellness and their interactions will be considered.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of HWM 300 & 350.
HWM 460Leadership and Change Management in Health3.00
This course will examine the various leadership and management styles, including business models of leadership. Organizational behavior, decision-making, and attributes of effective leadership will be reviewed in this course. Understanding the impact of changes in healthcare, wellness and fitness programs on various organizations is an objective of this course.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HWM 315 (previously HWM 400)
HWM 470Assessment and Evaluation for Wellness Managers3.00
This course surveys general approaches to assessment, programming and evaluation in health and wellness settings. Participants will explore individual, group, and organizational approaches to assessment, programming, and evaluating planned and organized efforts to promote both health and wellness.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of HWM 335 (or HWM 380) and HWM 430.
HWM 480Health Benefits for Wellness Managers3.00
The design and administration of a health care plan plays a key role in attracting and retaining employees and employers cost savings. This course is designed to provide you with a solid introduction to the basic issues of health care benefits and how to integrate successful return on investment,ROI, strategies for adopting preventive health benefits that enhance employee's well being.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed HWM 315 (previously HWM 400)
HWM 485Health Coaching for Wellness Managers3.00
The course will assist in developing a strong, useful theoretical viewpoint for health coaching as well as to understand those of therapists and how differential treatment therapeutic goals are set. Definition of coaching and diverse methodologies will be taught, practiced, compared and contrasted. Students will specifically gain an understanding of "What treatment, by whom, is most effective for individuals displaying specific problems and under what set of circumstances? As a result you will learn a variety of treatment modalities, and learn to respect vastly differing worldviews.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed HWM 305/340 & HWM 370.
HWM 492Independent Study in Health & Wellness Management1.00 - 6.00
This course is designed as a supplement to the required course work in HWM to meet special interests and/or needs of the student. Prerequisite: Consent of HWM Academic Director.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
HWM 493Health and Wellness Management Fieldwork Prep1.00
This course requires students to identify and secure fieldwork placement for completion the following semester. The fieldwork experience develops skills in program planning, implementation, promotion and evaluation, oral and written communication, collaboration and networking.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
HWM 494Health and Wellness Management Fieldwork3.00
Students engage in practical fieldwork experience as a pre-professional in a health/wellness setting to utilize skills and knowledge acquired in previous courses. This fieldwork experience is designed to further develop skills in some, but not necessarily all, of the following areas: program planning, implementation, promotion and evaluation, oral and written communication, collaboration and networking.
Prerequisites:
HWM 460, 470, 480, 493
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
HWM 496Health and Wellness Management Capstone3.00
This course requires the application of knowledge and skills acquired through successful completion of all HWM courses taken prior to or concurrent with this course. Using a case study, students demonstrate competence in health and wellness management by completing assignments and participating in discussion that results in the logical, sequential building of a strategic plan for a comprehensive corporate wellness program. Students demonstrate interviewing, professional networking and resume writing skills along with formally presenting their final strategic plan.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
HWM 499Special Topics in Health and Wellness Management3.00
 
IDS - Interdisciplinary Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
IDS 095Collegiate Study Skills1.00 - 3.00
Designed to enable the student to improve those areas of reading which have been found effective in successful college performance. Available to all students. Techniques to improve rate, develop study skills, and read with greater understanding will be developed.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
IDS 104First-Year Seminar-Social Sciences3.00
First Year Seminar
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
IDS 130Introduction to the College Experience1.00
Designed to help students successfully transition into the university setting. Topics covered will be helpful to for academic, personal and social success. Designed to give students the tools you will need to succeed and to have a productive and engaging university experience.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
IDS 131Transitions: From Military to Campus Culture3.00
Beginning-level seminar that fulfills a University Studies requirement for the social sciences. This course is limited in enrollment to students in the military, including veterans. This course enables students to examine human behavior or interaction using the methods and assumptions of social science research. This course was specifically developed for transitioning soldiers and veterans to support their academic and life goals. Topics covered include transitioning from military to civilian and campus life; connecting with resources to support success; and understanding the role of events and experiences on personal and professional goals. We will study developmental theories, including the adult learning theory; the mind-body relationship; and cognitive theories to better understand how we connect with our environment and engage in community and learning.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
IDS 189Interdisciplinary Studies Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
IDS 195Collegiate Relationships3.00
Interdisciplinary approach explores the relationship between the general principles of human relations and our everyday lives. Students are given the opportunity to achieve a deepened sense of awareness of themselves and others. This understanding will enable students to improve their relationships at school, work, in the family, and in society. Students examine basic processes of human interaction, particularly as they are affected by race, ethnicity, gender, age, and ability and cover issues such as: social influence processes, conflict resolution, small group theory, diversity, power in relationships, and group learning techniques.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
IDS 199Cross Registration1.00 - 6.00
IDS 220Emotional Intelligence3.00
This course is a required component of the Certificate in Ethical Leadership, but can also be taken as a standalone class. Students will develop awareness of their emotional intelligence capacities, how this affects their relationships, and what this means for their future success. Students will develop skills, such as listening, empathy, critical-thinking, and decision-making. Students will have the opportunity to practice and apply emotional intelligence skills through a semester-long project designed to enhance learning.[FM1]
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
IDS 289Interdisciplinary Studies Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
IDS 296Introduction to Distance Learning1.00
An overview of distance learning theory and applications, including use of technology, library services, academic support, and information literacy. Pass-Fail only.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
IDS 297Exploring Majors and Careers1.00 - 3.00
Introduction to academic and major exploration. Emphasis is on self-discovery and decision-making as they relate to personal preferences related to academic curriculum and major decisions.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
IDS 299National Student Exchange0.00
IDS 300Interdisciplinary Studies Major Planning1.00
Identification of educational, career and/or personal goals and the process of developing the Interdisciplinary Studies major. Online only, but available to all students. Pass/Fail only.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
IDS 301Individually Designed Major Planning1.00
Identification of educational, career and/or personal goals and the process of developing the Individually Designed major. This major in non-comprehensive and requires a minor. Online only, but available to all students. Pass/Fail only.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
IDS 305Tutoring Practicum1.00 - 3.00
Tutoring practicum in math, writing, or reading/study skills designed to develop competencies needed in peer tutoring with college students. Skills in content tutoring and interpersonal relations will be developed through a training program. Practicum involves 5-10 hours per week including tutoring, preparation time, and staff meetings. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102; MATH 240, or college-level reading/study skill proficiency. Permission of instructor and Student Support Services lab director required. Limited enrollment.
Prerequisites:
Student must be On Campus (not DLC)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
IDS 320Ethical Leadership3.00
This course is a required component of the Certificate in Ethical Leadership, but can also be taken as a standalone class. This course will focus on leadership models and ethical reasoning; developing an understanding of the role of emotions, empathy, and character in ethical decision-making; exploring one’s core values; exposure to ethical principles; and building skills in assertive communication. Students will learn and practice these foundational leadership skills through a semester-long project that will allow for skill development and application. We will apply a competency-oriented, collaborative approach to learning.[FM2]
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
IDS 350Graduate Record Exam (GRE) Preparation2.00
Provides an overview of and preparation for the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Students prepare for and/or improve their scores with specific strategies on each of the GRE general sections; verbal, quantitative reasoning and analytical writing. Specific focus to success on the computerized version of the GRE. McNair Scholars only.
Typically Offered:
Summer Only
IDS 389Interdisciplinary Studies Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
IDS 420Applied Ethical Leadership3.00
This advanced leadership course is an elective designed to provide opportunities for students to further deepen and apply their leadership knowledge and skills. Students will design and implement a personalized leadership development plan.[FM3]
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for enrolling in the course is IDS 220 and 320
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
IDS 489Interdisciplinary Studies Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
IDS 495Senior Experience2.00 - 3.00
Integration of the competencies of the Individually Designed major in a contract format. A presentation of the outcomes of the learning experience is required. The instructor of record is selected from faculty panel of the major depending on the focus of the learning contract. Students should register for IDS 495 as the last or one of the last course enrollments. Prerequisite: Admission to the Distance Learning Center.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
ITS - Information Technology and Systems
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ITS 108Computer Applications3.00
Use computer applications to increase personal and professional productivity. Students gain hands-on experience using a variety of productivity tools commonly found in software suites used in a professional setting, such as word processing, presentation graphics, spreadsheets, databases, and others. Classes are tailored to the college student with emphasis on providing real-world examples to make learning and using computer software interesting and applicable to a variety of career paths..
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITS 148Computer Applications for Productivity3.00
Designed for students interested in learning how to use a computer to increase their personal and professional productivity. Enhance computer skills by using a variety of productivity applications found in common software suites, such as word processing, presentation graphics, desktop publishing, spreadsheets, personal organizers, and others. Classes are tailored to the college student with emphasis on providing a hands-on experience to make learning and using computer software interesting and easy.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ITS 189Information Technology and Systems Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ITS 211Visual Programming Fundamentals3.00
Introduces students to basic programming methods and techniques using the latest development tools. Designed for students who view themselves as nonprogrammers, but who have an interest in computer programming to create macros or to write simple applications. Students learn programming skills by writing and debugging simple routines that emphasize programming constructs such as variables, control structures, and data input and output. Object-oriented concepts are presented and practiced to enhance the experience.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ITS 230Introduction to Information Technology3.00
Provides a stimulating experience for students with new perspectives on cutting-edge technology and systems. Illustrates how everyday computer technology is combined to form systems people and society depend upon. Covers core computer concepts, latest technological advances, and emerging trends in information system design and deployment. Arms participants with current knowledge about information technology used in a wide array of real-world applications.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ITS 289Information Technology and Systems Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ITS 310Information Technology Operations3.00
Go behind the scenes and discover the systems organizations use to provide computing and networking services. This course examines the technology and applications that drive modern IT operations such as server virtualization, virtual desktop infrastructure, cloud computing, and user state virtualization. Topics include desktop and application deployment, help desk services, and configuration management. Mobile applications are given special consideration. Students work with open source and proprietary software using state-of-art virtualization tools to model system configurations and learn problem solving skills through hands-on projects.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ITS 335Web Page Authoring3.00
Build functional and appealing Internet websites using readily available commercial software to design and construct web pages. Considers various website strategies and layouts that enable web users. Create web pages that integrate multimedia applications to present content in an attractive and user friendly manner. Learn about measures of performance and how to test your website for functionality. Designed for students with a wide variety of backgrounds and interests, employing a hands-on approach.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
ITS 342Information Systems3.00
Introduces topics and concepts of management information systems with emphasis on planning, organizing, and controlling user services and managing the system development process. Focuses on use of information system technologies in the business world from the standpoint of the end-user manager.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ITS 346Database Management3.00
Learn the science of database management to include the organization, storage, and retrieval of data used in a wide range of applications. Basic theory is combined with practical examples to reinforce concepts presented in class. Students are encouraged to apply learned skills to projects in their particular areas of interest. Intended for the student with no or minimal exposure to database systems and uses state-of-the-art database management system software.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ITS 350Networking and Communications3.00
Discover the ways data moves between computers, network-enabled devices, and other communication technology using wired and wireless media. A broad range of applications are considered ranging from networked enterprise to mobile technology to the ubiquitous broadcast signals used to transmit television and radio programs. Emphasis is placed on networking and communication technology and how it used to connect people with each other and with the information they need.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ITS 360Ethics in Information Technology3.00
Examines the impact computers and Internet technology have had on people and society through the lens of Internet law, ethics, and intellectual property. Designed to be a forum where students discuss and debate critical issues related to these areas. Students participate in exercises that stimulate critical thinking and prepare them to address complicated issues that provoke a wide range of opinions.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
ITS 364Digital Multimedia3.00
Examines the history and underlying theory behind computer integration of text, sound, video, animation, and graphics. Survey the fundamental concepts and historical development of multimedia. Review current and future applications of multimedia. Introduce the practical tools and techniques for developing digital media applications. Students gain practical experience in design and implementation of multimedia applications on a platform.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
ITS 370Information Security3.00
Provides the knowledge of information assurance and security necessary for modern programmers, analysts, and other IT professionals and also important for business managers, auditors and many other careers. Covers a diverse range of topics recommended by the Association for Computing Machinery, including operational issues, policies and procedures, attacks and defense mechanisms, risk analysis, recovery and business continuity, data security, cryptography, and digital forensics.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
ITS 380Global E-Commerce Systems3.00
A close look at technology that enables e-commerce to leverage information to their strategic advantage. Examines the business use to improve productivity, manage information, market and sell product, streamline supply chains, and compete on a global scale that has led to a revolution in the e-business enterprise. Students are guided to understand basic e-commerce and e-business systems on key areas of developing, managing, and maintaining a successful e-commerce site. Case studies and examples illustrate how theory is successfully translated into real-life business scenarios.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ITS 381Special Projects1.00 - 4.00
Various individual and small-group projects carried out under the supervision of one or more instructors. Requires weekly progress reports plus a final report and/or a final exam. May be repeated, but no more than a total of four credits may be earned from both ITS 381 and CSCI 381. Pass-Fail only. Prerequisites: Preliminary project plan and an independent study contract. Offered as needed.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ITS 389Information Technology Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ITS 400Information Technology and Systems Internship2.00 - 7.00
Students extend classroom learning in the ITS field. Students obtain the cooperation of an employer and prepare a learning contract. Students will submit weekly recaps of activities and a final report about their experience. The internship may be taken any academic term. Pass-Fail only.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITS 481Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in information technology and systems. May be repeated when topics are different. Offered as needed.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ITS 489Information Technology Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ITS 498Individual Capstone Project1.00
Students will integrate an information technology and systems (ITS)application into the senior experience in their program of study. Requires weekly progress reports and demonstration of learned skills through a project under the supervision of one or more instructors. Pass-Fail only.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ITS 499Group Capstone Project1.00
Group projects are carried out by students. Students will integrate an information technology and systems (ITS) application into the senior experience in their program of study. Requires weekly progress reports and demonstration of learned skills through a project under the supervision of one or more instructors. Pass-Fail only.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
JAPA - Japanese
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
JAPA 101Beginning Japanese I3.00
Study of language fundamentals with emphasis on development of listening and speaking skills. Practice with reading and writing. Japanese script (hiragana, katakana and kanji) is taught from the beginning of the course. Presumes no previous language study.
JAPA 102Beginning Japanese II3.00
Continuation of JAPA 101. Appropriate for someone with up to two years of high school Japanese. Prerequisit: JAPA 101.
JAPA 201Intermediate Japanese I3.00
This intermediate undergraduate course builds upon the skills students obtained in introductory Japanese language courses JAPA 101 and 102. By the end of this course, students should understand more advanced usage of adjectives, adverbs and verb conjugations. They should also be able to read texts containing a limited number of Kanji (Chinese characters), construct compound sentences, and converse with relative ease on various everyday subjects, such as vacation, shopping and sickness. Prerequisites: JAPA 101 and 102, or approval of instructor. This course is offered during Fall semester.
Prerequisites:
JAPA 101 and JAPA 102, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
JAPA 202Intermediate Japanese II3.00
This intermediate undergraduate course builds upon the skills students obtained in introductory Japanese language courses JAPA 101 and 102 as well as the intermediate-level course, JAPA 201. By the end of this course, students should understand more advanced usage of expressions with potential verbs, volitional form and verb functions. They should also be able to read 64 additional Kanji, construct compound sentences, and converse with relative ease on everyday subjects, such as travelling, giving and receiving, and hotels and banks. Prerequisites: JAPA 101, 102 and 201, or approval of instructor. This course is offered during Spring semester.
Prerequisites:
JAPA 101 and JAPA 102 and JAPA 201, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
 
LSTU - Legal Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
LSTU 115Law and Human Behavior3.00
Provides a general framework of knowledge, ideas and thought -- mainstream and critical -- regarding the assumptions, structures, actors, operation, intentions and outcomes of the American legal system. Interdisciplinary liberal arts course exploring the effect of law on and in our society from past, present and future perspectives. Law now pervades most of what we think, do and believe in the United States. This course will help illuminate how and why that happens.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
LSTU 117Paralegalism and Ethics3.00
Explores the field of paralegalism, introduction to the law, legal procedures and paralegal skills and legal ethics.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 189Legal Studies Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
LSTU 210Criminal Procedure3.00
Study of the criminal justice process. Issues of search, seizure and arrest, pretrial and motions practice, jury trial and evidentiary rules; historical basis and evolution of the various aspects of the criminal justice process.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 211Criminal Law3.00
The legal definition of crime and defenses; purposes and function of the substantive criminal law; historical foundations; the limits of criminal law.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LSTU 220Civil Procedure3.00
Survey of the civil litigation process in state and federal courts, including form and content of documents used in instituting, prosecuting and defending lawsuits.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 221Administrative Law2.00
Review of federal, state and local administrative agencies.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
LSTU 223Family Law2.00
The law of family relation, including marriage, annulment, dissolution, judicial separation, alimony, legitimacy of children, custody and adoption, community property and non-marital relationships.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
LSTU 224Personal Injury Litigation2.00
Study of torts, including negligence, defenses, strict liability, nuisance, defamation and product liability.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
LSTU 228Contract Law2.00
Consideration of the principles of the law of contracts and restitution; contract formation; enforceability; performance and breach; plaintiffs' remedies and third-party interests.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
LSTU 233Law, Citizenship and Civic Engagement3.00
Investigates the legal rights and responsibilities of citizens in the United States, both individual and corporate. Topics include the ethical dimensions of citizenship, its acquisition and loss. The course involves the student in academic service learning in the local community.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LSTU 261Contemporary Issues in Law and Society3.00
Explores controversies arising within or impinging on the American legal system. Research, discussion and debate on 20 pressing issues of contemporary significance in American law. Students consider the differential impact of issues on various disempowered and minority groups in the United States and around the world. Fulfills General Education Social Science-Contemporary Society category.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 268Alternative Dispute Resolution3.00
Compares and contrasts the adversary system of American law, the settlement/negotiation model advanced within the Alternative Dispute Resolution movement. Discussion of comparative institutions, processes, costs, theoretical approaches and justifications. Treatment of theories and practice and skill/training development of alternatives to litigation including mediation, arbitration, mini-trials, etc.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LSTU 289Legal Studies Elective0.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
LSTU 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements, consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if content is different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
LSTU 303Environmental Law and Regulation3.00
Explores the ethics of and relationships between environmental issues and governmental action, as well as conservation, preservation and management of natural resources through public policy relation to government and the role of morality and legislation in matters of individual choice.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
LSTU 305Methods of Legal Research and Writing3.00
Introduction to legal research, including legal resources and computerized legal data research; practice briefing cases and use of treatises, texts, digests, reporter systems, citation resources, encyclopedias, legal periodicals and government documents; introduction to basic principles of legal analysis and writing principles.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LSTU 306Methods of Legal Writing and Argumentation3.00
Advanced course in legal research, writing and argumentation skills.
Prerequisites:
Having completed LSTU 305 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 321Judicial Process3.00
This course asks two easily stated and related questions: (1) how do judges judge? (2) how should judges judge? Study of adjudication in both civil and criminal contexts.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 333Great Legal Trials: Stories That Changed Law3.00
Explores the great legal trials that informed and transformed our understanding of the law and the society that we live within. Students will also deepen their understanding of theories and practices of argument construction and defense. Offers numerous hands-on practice experiences.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
LSTU 354Jurisprudence3.00
Consideration of law, its means and ends; focus on special problems in contemporary legal philosophy such as conflicting theories of punishment, the natural law/positivist debate, individual rights in relation to government and the role of morality and legislation in matters of individual choice.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
LSTU 363Comparative Law and Courts3.00
Examines several judicial systems including the common law and civil law systems, Islamic justice, socialist law and Asian and African systems. Terrorism and the courts.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
LSTU 365Race, Class, Gender and the Law3.00
Explores how the law has interacted with, impacted and affected race, ethnicity, gender and class issues in the United States context. Students read and criticize key legal cases, explore arguments made in legal settings about race/ethnicity/class/gender, examine the areas of silence or inaction by the law and assess the current interconnection between race, ethnicity, class, gender and the law. Fulfills diversity requirement of General Education.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
LSTU 389Legal Studies Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
LSTU 450U.S.Constitutional Law, Part I3.00
Survey of the origin and development of the U.S. Constitution using Supreme Court cases which define the powers of the Supreme Court, Congress and the President; the relationship between the national government and the individual states.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 451U.S. Constitutional Law, Part II-Civil Liberties and Civil Rights3.00
Study of the constitutional principles concerning the relations between the individual and the government; using decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court; consideration of the requirements of due process and criminal procedure necessary to safeguard the constitutional rights of criminal suspects and defendants.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LSTU 485Internship3.00
A structured and focused field experience in a law-related placement. Students perform duties assigned by their placement supervisor, keep a log/journal of activities and prepare a 12-15 page analysis paper discussing specific ways their placement complemented, and added perspective to coursework. Students completing LSTU 485 as a senior capstone experience will be required to give a public presentation on their work. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
LSTU 489Legal Studies Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
LSTU 497Special and Student-Initiated Seminars1.00 - 3.00
This is a specially designed seminar or student-initiated seminar when there is sufficient interest or a special topic to examine. For further information, contact LSTU program faculty.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
LSTU 498Senior Capstone Presentation0.00
Required culminating senior-year public presentation, based on LSTU 485 (Internship), LSTU 499-1 (Mock Trial or Mock Mediation) or LSTU 499-2 (Independent Research/Applied Skills). See UW-Superior catalogue for Legal Studies capstone curse descriptions. The presentation must be given at an arranged time in the semester of the student's expected graduation. It may be made in one of several media, including a poster, theatrical or other performance, digital video, film, etc. This course is taken on a pass-fail basis. Failure to complete LSTU 498 may block graduation. Arranged. Advisor permission required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
LSTU 499Independent Research/Applied Skills1.00 - 3.00
Section 1: Mock Trial. Applied skills course experience for those participating in competitive Mock Trial. Spring semester each year. Section 2: General Research. For students pursuing independent and advanced research projects under the supervision of a faculty member on a topic and consistent with a plan mutually agreed to between instructor and student. Also can be used for applied skills experiences that are equivalent to academic credit experiences within judgment of instructor of Legal Studies courses. On demand. Course can be repeated for up to six credits toward graduation although only three credits count toward major/minor requirements. Students completing LSTU 499 as a senior capstone experience will be required to give a public presentation of their work. See Legal Studies faculty for more information.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
MATH - Mathematics
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
MATH 090Fundamentals of Mathematics3.00
Review of pre-algebra mathematics with an introduction to basic algebra. Topics include: real numbers, with an emphasis on fractions and decimals; percent notation; exponents; algebraic expressions; solving equations and inequalities; polynomials; basic factoring; unit conversions; and an introduction to graphing linear equations.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 095Fundamentals of Algebra3.00
Review of elementary algebra topics typically studied in high school. Topics include: the real number system; linear equations and inequalities and their graphs; systems of linear equations; polynomials, factoring polynomials; rational expressions; rational exponents; radical expressions. Does not apply toward general education requirements or graduation requirements.
Prerequisites:
MATH 090 with a grade of C- or better or an acceptable score on the Math Placement test.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 102Intermediate Algebra2.00
Review of intermediate algebra topics typically studied in high school. Topics include: rational expressions and equations; rational exponents; radical expressions and equations; complex numbers; functions; quadratic equations and functions; graphing techniques, conic sections; exponential and logarithmic functions and equations.
Prerequisites:
Adequate math placement score or completion of MATH 095 with a C- or better.
MATH 112Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics3.00
A liberal arts mathematics course presenting mathematics as a tool used by a wide range of professionals in modern society. Real-life examples are used to promote understanding of mathematics and its relationship to other areas of study. Examples will be chosen from graph theory (Traveling Salesman Problem and Euler Circuits), voting theory (fairness criteria and Arrow's impossibility theorem), elementary probability and statistics, logic, geometry, mathematics of growth, mathematics of finance, and mathematical modeling.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Adequate math placement score or completion of MATH 095 with a C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 113Algebra with Applications3.00
Algebraic concepts, problem-solving techniques, and applications for students in business, natural and social sciences. Topics include rates; proportions; linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic functions and their graphs; matrices; complex numbers.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Adequate Math Placement Score or completion of MATH 095 with a C- or better
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 115Precalculus5.00
Covers the algebra and trigonometry required for Calculus and Analytic Geometry. Topics include review of intermediate algebra; composite and inverse functions; polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, identities, and equations; the binomial theorem; fundamentals of analytic geometry; and conic sections.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Adequate math placement score or completion of MATH 113 with a C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 130Elementary Statistics4.00
Introductory course for students of all disciplines. Includes descriptive statistics, probability, the binomial and normal distributions, confidence intervals, correlation and linear regression, Central Limit Theorem, and one-sample (population mean and population proportion) and two-sample (population means) hypothesis testing. Problems are taken from various fields of study dependent on statistical decision making.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Adequate math placement score or completion of MATH 095 with a C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 151Calculus for Business, Life, and Social Sciences3.00
A short course in calculus including concepts and problem-solving techniques for students in business, economics, biology and the social sciences. Topics include algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions; derivatives, and optimization problems; integrals; partial derivatives and Lagrange multipliers as time permits.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Adequate math placement score or completion of MATH 113 with a C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 189Mathematics Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
MATH 240Calculus and Analytic Geometry I4.00
A first course in the fundamentals of calculus. Topics include: real numbers; functions; limits; continuity; derivatives, integrals; the use of computational tools in calculus; transcendental functions; and applications.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Adequate math placement score or completion of MATH 115 with a C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 241Calculus and Analytic Geometry II4.00
Continuation of MATH 240. Topics include: conic sections; techniques and applications of integration; parametric curves and polar coordinates; indeterminate forms; improper integrals; and infinite series.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 240 with a grade of C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 242Calculus and Analytic Geometry III4.00
Continuation of MATH 241. Topics include: three-dimensional analytic geometry; vectors; partial derivatives; multiple integrals; line integrals; and surface integrals.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 241 with a grade of C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MATH 289Mathematics Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
MATH 310Introduction to Abstract Mathematics3.00
Fundamentals of formal mathematics emphasizing mathematical writing and types of formal proof. Includes significant coverage of topics in logic, set theory basic number theory and relations and fuctions.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 240 with a C- or better or instructor permission.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 315Linear Algebra3.00
Introduction to the algebra and geometry of two-and three-dimensional space and extension to n-dimensional space. Topics include: line and coordinate vectors; systems of linear equations and their solution by reduction methods; matrix algebra; determinants; fundamentals of abstract vector spaces; linear independence, dimension theorems; linear transformations; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; diagonal matrices; quadratic forms; inner products; and the Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 310.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MATH 320Discrete Structures4.00
Continuation of MATH 310. Investigation of concepts of non-calculus mathematics used in computer science, operations research and other areas of applied mathematics. Topics include: relations and functions, recurrence relations, combinatorics, graph theory, and related algorithms.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 310.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MATH 344Differential Equations4.00
Introduction to the theory of ordinary differential equations including some coverage of series solutions, as time permits. Also covers various classical applications, such as spring mass systems.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 241.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
MATH 362Topics In Geometry3.00
Modern treatment of topics from Euclidean geometry with an introduction to other geometries. Appropriate for students in Elementary or Secondary Education.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 310.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
MATH 370Probability3.00
A first course in Calculus-based probability theory. Topics include: axioms of probability; combinatorial analysis; conditional probability; independence; discrete and continuous random variables; probability distributions; expectation; variance; Poisson processes; and limit theorems.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 241 and MATH 310.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
MATH 371Statistics4.00
Calculus-based statistics emphasizing applications intended for students in applied mathematics, economics and the sciences. Topics include: the use of statistical software; estimation and prediction; hypothesis testing; linear and multiple regression; F and t tests; analysis of variance; and non-parametric statistics.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 241 and MATH 310 (MATH 242 recommended).
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
MATH 380Introduction to Mathematical Modeling4.00
Applied mathematics course emphasizing probabilistic models. Topics include: discrete-and continuous-time Markov chains; Monte Carlo estimates; queuing theory; reliability theory; Brownian motion; and financial mathematics.
Prerequisites:
MATH 241 with a grade of C- or better and either MATH 370 or MATH 371. (MATH 242 is also recommended.)
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
MATH 381Special Projects1.00 - 4.00
Various individual and small-group projects carried out under the supervision of one or more instructors. Requires weekly progress reports plus a final report and/or a final exam. May be repeated, but no more than a total of four credits may be earned from both MATH 381 and CSCI 381. Pass-Fail only. Preliminary project plan and an independent study contract required prior to enrollment.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
MATH 385Introduction to Operations Research3.00
Topics include Mathematical programming, (Linear programming problems, Transportation problems, Dynamic programming, Game Theory), Queuing Theory, Inventory Theory, Reliability Theory, and Simulation techniques.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 315 and MATH 370.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
MATH 389Mathematics Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
MATH 390Mathematical Sciences Internship1.00 - 4.00
Work in an approved position to gain experience in solving real problems using computer science, mathematics, and statistics. Interns may receive salaried appointments with cooperating companies. Pass-Fail only.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
MATH 391Putnam Mathematical Competition0.00 - 3.00
Preparation for the national Putnam Mathematics Contest. Includes review of previous examination problems and lectures on selected topics. May be repeated for a total of up to six credits. Pass-Fail only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MATH 421Theory of Computation4.00
Thorough introduction to automata, formal languages and computability. Topics include: models of computation; regular and context-free languages; finite and pushdown automata; Turing machines; unsolvable decision problems; and fundamentals of computational complexity.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 320.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
MATH 425Algorithm Design and Analysis4.00
Study of the design and analysis of algorithms that are based on elementary data structures such as queues, stacks and trees. Some graph and network algorithms (shortest paths, connectivity, coloring, flows, matchings), geometric algorithms (convex hulls, range search, nearest neighbors), NP-complexity, approximation algorithms (vertex cover, traveling salesman, scheduling), and introduction to randomized algorithms. Introduction to algorithm design techniques, including greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, and dynamic programming. Lower and upper bounds of program complexity are analyzed. Introduction to algorithms used in the area of information security.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 320.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
MATH 437Cryptography4.00
Study of the theory of cryptography together with applied programming projects. Topics include: discrete probability spaces; Shannon's theory of information and perfect secrecy; classical cryptosystems and cryptanalysis; authentication and key exchange; public key cryptosystems; elementary number theory, primality checking, the RSA cryptosystem; and Advanced Encryption Standard (AES).
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 310 and CSCI 201.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
MATH 440Real Analysis4.00
Fundamental concepts of limit, continuity, differentiability, and integrability of functions of one variable and sequences and series.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 242 and MATH 310.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
MATH 450Topology4.00
Topology of Euclidean space, metric spaces, topological spaces, bases and neighborhoods, Hausdorff property, continuity, homeomorphisms and embeddings, connectivity, and compactness.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 240 and MATH 310.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
MATH 455Abstract Algebra4.00
Introduction to algebraic systems including groups, rings, integral domains and fields, homomorphisms and isomorphisms.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 310.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
MATH 471Introduction to Complex Variables4.00
Introduction to the study of analytic functions including differentiation, integration and series.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 242 and MATH 310.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
MATH 475Numerical Analysis4.00
Study of theory and applications of computational techniques for mathematical solutions emphasizing rapid approximation and error analysis. Topics include: solution to equations in one variable; polynomial approximations to functions; error analysis; numerical solutions to ordinary differential equations; boundary value problems.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 242 and MATH 310.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
MATH 481Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of selected topics in mathematical sciences. May be repeated when topics are different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
MATH 489Mathematics Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
MATH 498Mathematics Capstone1.00
Senior year students carry out individual investigations into chosen topics of mathematics. A written paper of their findings will be presented to the Mathematics and Computer Science department. Instructor consent is required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
MEDI - Mediation
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
MEDI 241Ethics and State Regulation of Mediation1.00
Explores the ethical codes of conduct for mediation, the state regulatory schemes for conflict regulation and the professional expectations for mediators as well as domestic violence and mediation training.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MEDI 471Family Law Mediation3.00
Theory and practices of conflict resolution and mediation in the area of family law (including but not limited to custody, parenting, visitation, divorce settlement issues). In conjunction with MEDI 241, this course meets the 40-hour State of Minnesota Rule 114 requirements for the family facilitative roster and the State of Wisconsin Chapter 767 requirements.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
MEDI 472Civil Law Mediation2.00
Theory and practice of mediation and conflict resolution in the civil law. In conjunction with MEDI 241, this course meets the 30-hour requirement for the State of Minnesota Rule 114 in civil facilitative roster.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
 
MTHED - Mathematics Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
MTHED 189Mathematics Education Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
MTHED 250Essentials of Mathematics for Elementary Teachers3.00
This course for pre-service elementary school teachers includes mathematical content and concept required to teach at elementary school. It includes various mathematics topics which are essential for teaching mathematics at elementary school. This course covers both content and methods for teaching mathematics grades 9-12. Prerequisite recommended is general education math course. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Completion of General Education Mathematics Course(s)
Typically Offered:
Fall & Spr On Campus & Online
MTHED 289Mathematics Education Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
MTHED 305Tutoring Practicum1.00 - 3.00
Tutoring practicum designed for secondary mathematics teaching majors and minors to develop competencies in mathematics content tutoring skills and interpersonal relations needed in peer tutoring with college students. Permission of Student Support Services lab supervisor required. Limited enrollment.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 240 with a grade of C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MTHED 322Teaching Elementary/Middle School Mathematics3.00
A learner-center approach methods course focusing on the theories, models, and strategies for effectively understanding and teaching mathematics concepts and skills in the five content areas to elementary/middle school children grades K-9. National and state standards guide the conceptual framework for this course. Topics include Numbers and Operations; Measurement; Geometry; Data Analysis and Probability; and Algebra. Peer-to-Peer teaching required. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 230 or MTHED 250 (C or Better), and T ED Admission
Typically Offered:
Fall & Spr On Campus & Online
MTHED 323Teaching Elementary/Middle School Mathematics II3.00
Study of the theories, models and strategies for teaching mathematics concepts and skills to elementary/middle school children (ages 6-12/13; grade K-9). National and state standards guide the conceptual framework for this course. Pre-student teaching clinical experience required. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MTHED 322 (C or Better), Completion of T ED 300 (C or Better), and T ED Admission. Teacher Education Non-Academic Test (TB and Criminal Background Check).
Typically Offered:
Fall & Spr On Campus & Online
MTHED 339Secondary Methods in Mathematics Education3.00
General principles and problems of teaching mathematics in the secondary schools. Emphasis on organizing teaching activities; teaching materials and resources; and current methodology. This course is offered on-campus only. Pre-Student Teaching Clinical experience required. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Teacher Education Program and Completion of T ED 300 (C or Better). Teacher Education Non-Academic Test (TB and Criminal Background Check)
Typically Offered:
Selected Spring Terms Only
MTHED 389Mathematics Education Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
MTHED 489Mathematics Education Elective0.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
MUSED - Music Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
MUSED 165Introduction to Music Education1.00
MUSED 165 Introduction to Music Education provides students with an orientation to music teaching and learning in the schools. Students are introduced to philosophical premises and theories that underlie music education, an overview of the history of music education, and experience current trends and approaches to music education practiced in the United States. Includes observing in the schools and hands on participation in methodologies.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MUSI 174
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSED 369Choral Pedagogy and Literature2.00
Survey of choral literature from a variety of historical periods, including the Renaissance, Baroque, Classico-Romantic, and modern periods; survey of choral literature appropriate for children's choirs and school choirs; choral warm-up procedures and exercises; and evaluation of pitch and rhythmic errors, tone, tuning, and blend issues.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MUSI 380.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
MUSED 370General Music Methods3.00
Preparation for teaching and learning in general music grades Pre-K-8. Students study principles of learning, educational theories and philosophies as applied to music education, and that underpin the design of curriculum and instruction in general music. Under the broad aim that children and youth learn to respond to music, perform and create music in ways that support lifelong engagement in music, higher education students become aware of methodologies, materials, technologies, curricula and resources for teaching and learning in general music. In alignment with local, state and national standards for music education in the United States, and according to the physical, cognitive and emotional development of children and youths, students learn how to develop daily and unit lesson plans, how to design instruction and how to evaluate and assess student learning in general music education. Students learn techniques for age-appropriate classroom management. Students learn about various models and approaches to middle school general music. Students are directed to professional organizations, journals and research that support their future careers and the development of a personal philosophy of teaching and learning in music. Includes applied fieldwork.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Teacher Education Program
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
MUSED 371Choral Methods and Literature3.00
A study of the skills and knowledge necessary to successfully manage and teach choral ensembles in grades six through twelve. Students will learn rehearsal techniques, choral warm-ups, classroom management tools, and curricular/program development. This course will also feature a brief survey of choral music with an emphasis on literature appropriate for children's and school choirs. Includes applied fieldwork.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MUSI 380 and admission to the Teacher Education Program
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
MUSED 372Instrumental Methods and Literature3.00
A Study of the skills and knowledge necessary to successfully manage and teach instrumental ensembles in grades six through twelve. Students will learn rehearsal techniques, classroom management tools, and curricular/program development. This course will also feature a brief survey of band and orchestra music with an emphasis on literature appropriate for middle school and high school band and orchestra ensembles. Includes applied fieldwork.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MUSI 380 and admission to the Teacher Education Program
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
MUSED 382Elementary General Music Methods2.00
Preparation for teaching and learning in general music grades PreK-5 according to children's physical, cognitive and emotional development and current educational and philosophical theories as applied to music education. Students learn how to design curriculum, daily and unit lesson plans according to local, state and national standards for music education, and develop understanding and skills in instructional and assessment strategies common to American methods of music education. Includes fieldwork.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
MUSED 383Teaching Music in the Elementary School3.00
This course is designed for students pursuing licensure in elementary education. Students develop knowledge, skills and understandings for teaching and learning in integrated and interdisciplinary forms of music education that support learning in the various content areas of the general curriculum grades 4K-9. In support of children and youths’ cognitive, affective, physical and social growth, MUSED 383 students study children and youths’ developmental considerations for teaching and learning in music and develop basic strategies in song teaching, classroom instrument playing, integrated lesson design and sequencing of instruction. Students experience several forms of integrated and interdisciplinary music education, are made aware of the possibilities for connecting music with learning in other subjects and where collaboration between general music educators and classroom educators might be possible. Included: assessment, evaluation, differentiated instruction, culturally responsive teaching and learning, special education and management as applied to music education and integrated music education. Includes fieldwork.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSED 384Secondary Choral Methods2.00
A study of the skills and knowledge necessary to successfully manage and teach a secondary choral program. Study of rehearsal technique and management issues is combined with examination of choral literature and performance practice.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MUSI 380 and admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
MUSED 385Instrumental Methods2.00
Curriculum, materials, organization, conducting, and administration of instrumental music for the upper elementary grades and the secondary school.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
MUSED 386Secondary General Music Methods2.00
Preparation for teaching and learning in general music grades 6-12 according to the physical, cognitive and emotional development of youths and current educational and philosophical theories as applied to music education. Students learn how to design curriculum, daily and unit lesson plans, instruction and assessments according to local, state and national standards for music education in the United States. Additionally, students study course design and school scheduling for middle and high school education. Includes fieldwork.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MUSED 382 and admission to Teacher Education Program.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
MUSED 388Secondary Band and Orchestra Literature2.00
Survey of high school band and orchestra literature with emphasis on rehearsal problems, difficulties for individual instruments, and conducting problems.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
 
MUSI - Music
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
MUSI 102Class Piano I1.00
Basic course in elements of piano playing.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 103Class Piano II1.00
Continuation of MUSI 102.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MUSI 102; co-requisite is MUSI 172 and MUSI 174, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 104Brass Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for brass ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 105Woodwind Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for woodwind ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 107UWS Singers0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for advanced choral musicians. Approximately three to four performance opportunities per semester, both on an off-campus. Field trip participation required. Open to all students by audition. May be repeated for credit
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 108Percussion Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
The study and performance of music suitable for percussion ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 109Jazz Combo0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for jazz combos. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 110Chorale0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of a variety of choral literature, including choral/orchestral masterworks. Approximately two to three performance opportunities per semester, both on and off-campus. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 111Jazz Band0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of jazz band literature from the swing era through the most progressive trends. Open to all students by audition. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 112Symphonic Band0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of college band and wind ensemble literature. Open to all students by audition. Some university-owned instruments available. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 113Chamber Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for piano ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 114University Orchestra0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of literature for orchestra and chamber orchestra from the 17th to 21st centuries. Open to all students by audition. Some university-owned instruments available. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 115Chamber Winds0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for mixed ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 116Men's Choir0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for male choir. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 117Opera Workshop0.00 - 1.00
Provides progressive training in the art of music and drama culminating in a performance of opera, operetta, musical theatre, and/or scenes. May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 118Global Percussion Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for steel drum ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 120Applied Music-Flute/Piccolo1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Flute/Piccolo. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition and instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 121Applied Music-Oboe/English Horn1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Oboe/English Horn. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition and instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 122Applied Music-Clarinet1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction Clarinet. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition and instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 123Applied Music-Saxophone1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Saxophone. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition and instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 124Applied Music-Bassoon1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Bassoon. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition and instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 125Applied Music-French Horn1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in French Horn. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition and consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 126Applied Music-Trumpet1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Trumpet. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 127Applied Music-Trombone/Euphonium1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Trombone/Euphonium. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 128Applied Music-Tuba1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Tuba. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 129Applied Music-Percussion1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Percussion. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 130Applied Music-Guitar1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Guitar. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 131Applied Music-Harp1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Harp. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 132Applied Music-Violin1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Violin. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required before enrolling in this class.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 133Applied Music-Viola1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Viola. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in the course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 134Applied Music-Cello1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Cello. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 135Applied Music-String Bass1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in String Bass. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 136Applied Music-Piano1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Piano. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for this course is consent of Music Faculty in area of applied study/or an audition.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 137Applied Music-Organ1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Organ. Open to all students with sufficient keyboard background. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or instructor consent is required to enroll this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 139Applied Music-Voice1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Voice. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 140Vocal Techniques1.00
Basic anatomy, physiology and biomechanics of the voice with emphasis on the three fundamentals of voice production: breath, phonation, and resonance. Open to all students.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
MUSI 141Woodwind Techniques1.00
Practical study of woodwind instruments, including materials and methods of teaching. Primarily for music majors and minors. Open to all students with previous musical experience if class size permits.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
MUSI 143Percussion Techniques1.00
Practical study of percussion instruments, including materials and methods of teaching. Open to all students if class size permits.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
MUSI 145English and Italian Diction1.00
Study of the rules of English and Italian lyric diction. Exercises and performance in each language.
MUSI 146French and German Diction1.00
Study of the rules of French and German lyric diction. Exercises and performance in each language.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
MUSI 150Concert/Recital Class0.00
Attendance and evaluation of a specified number of concerts and recitals within and outside of class time. Required of music majors and minors. Open to all students. May be repeated .
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 151Brass Repertory/Pedagogy1.00
Study of repertoire and pedagogy for various brass instruments and voices. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 152Woodwind Repertory/Pedagogy1.00
Study of repertoire and pedagogy for various Woodwind instruments and voices. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 153Piano Repertory1.00
Study of repertoire for solo piano. May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 154Organ Repertory/Pedagogy1.00
Study of repertoire and pedagogy for organ. May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 155String Repertory/Pedagogy1.00
Study of repertoire and pedagogy for various string instruments. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 157Percussion Repertory/Pedagogy1.00
Study of repertoire and pedagogy for percussion. Consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 160Music Appreciation3.00
Study of the musical elements, forms, and stylistic periods in Western musical culture. Includes a discussion of composers' lives, individual styles, and representative works. Required listening.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 161Music and World Culture3.00
Survey of non-Western musical cultures, including ethnic origins of folk and traditional music in America. Required listening. Open to all students.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 170Introduction To Music3.00
This is the first music education course in the two-course preparation for the elementary education degree program. Goals: development of Western music skills and understanding in music, reading, playing, singing, informed listening skills, understanding in beginning music theory and applied creative thinking in music for lifelong social music taking. Music majors and minors may not apply this course toward their major or minor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 171Ear Training I1.00
Basic drills in sight singing, melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation and keyboard harmony.
Prerequisites:
Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 173 and MUSI 171 is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 172Ear Training II1.00
Continuation of MUSI 171.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MUSI 171. Co-requisites for taking this course is MUSI 174.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 173Theory I3.00
Study of scales, intervals, triad, triad inversions, melodic form, and basic harmonic progressions including primary chords. Music terminology and basic form concepts will be introduced. Introduction to non-harmonic tones and figured bass. Beginning elements of counterpoint, including first through fifth species contrapuntal writing, will be introduced.
Prerequisites:
Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 173 and MUSI 171 is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 174Theory II3.00
Continuation of MUSI 173. Study of melodic structures and continued examination and writing of non-harmonic tones. Expansion beyond primary chords including secondary diatonic chords, dominant and supertonic seventh chords, secondary dominant chords, and elementary modulation.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MUSI 171 and 173. Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 172 and 174 is required.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 187Piano Pedagogy2.00
Intensive study and evaluation of the various methods books used in piano teaching, both for beginners and intermediate level literature. Presentation of related pedagogy problems encountered in piano teaching.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of three years of private piano study.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 189Music Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
MUSI 191Keyboard Accompanying1.00
Extensive individual or group study in the theory and practice of musical performance, conducting, or musical group organization and promotion. Projects are designed in consultation with the instructor and/or the student's advisor. May be repeated for credit. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 192Jazz Improvisation1.00
Extensive individual or group study in the theory and practice of musical performance, conducting, or musical group organization and promotion. Projects are designed in consultation with the instructor and/or the student's advisor. May be repeated for credit. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 200Music Technology1.00
By the end of this course, students will demonstrate knowledge of technologies used by professional musicians and music educators. Possible topics include: music notation software; audio recording and editing; sequencing and MIDI; multimedia presentations; web publishing; and online resources.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 202Class Piano III1.00
Continuation of MUSI 103. Further development of piano skills.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MUSI 103.
MUSI 203Class Piano IV1.00
Continuation of MUSI 202. Completion of skills necessary to pass the piano proficiency exam.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for this course is completion of MUSI 202, and co-requisite is MUSI 272 and MUSI 274.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 220Applied Music Flute/Piccolo4.00
Private instruction in Flute/Piccolo. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 221Applied Music Oboe/English Horn4.00
Private instruction in Oboe/English horn. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 222Applied Music-Clarinet4.00
Private instruction in Clarinet. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 223Applied Music-Saxophone4.00
Private instruction in Saxophone. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 224Applied Music-Bassoon4.00
Private instruction in Bassoon. Open to instrumental, keyboard, and vocal performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 225Applied Music-French Horn4.00
Private instruction in French Horn. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 226Applied Music-Trumpet4.00
Private instruction in Trumpet. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 227Applied Music-Trombone/Euphonium4.00
Private instruction in Trombone/Euphonium. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 228Applied Music-Tuba4.00
Private instruction in Tuba. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and instructor consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 229Applied Music-Percussion4.00
Private instruction in Percussion. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 230Applied Music-Guitar4.00
Private instruction in Guitar. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 231Applied Music-Harp4.00
Private instruction in Harp. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 232Applied Music-Violin4.00
Private instruction in Violin. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 233Applied Music-Viola4.00
Private instruction in Viola. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 234Applied Music-Cello4.00
Private instruction in Cello. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 235Applied Music-String Bass4.00
Private instruction in String Bass. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 236Applied Music-Piano4.00
Private instruction in Piano. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 237Applied Music-Organ4.00
Private instruction in Organ. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 239Applied Music-Voice4.00
Private instruction in Voice. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 241Brass Techniques1.00
Practical study of five of the most common brass instruments: trumpet, French horn, trombone, euphonium, and tuba. Primarily for music majors and minors but open to all students if class size permits. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
MUSI 243String Techniques1.00
Practical study of the orchestral stringed instruments: violin, viola, cello, double bass, including materials and methods of teaching. Primarily for music majors and minors, but open to all students with previous musical experience if class size permits. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
MUSI 266Jazz Appreciation3.00
History of jazz from its beginnings to its most progressive trends, using compositions and recordings to trace its stylistic and technical developments. Open to all students.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 271Ear Training III1.00
Sight singing, melodic and harmonic dictation, keyboard harmony, and rhythm drills to coincide with material covered in MUSI 273.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MUSI 172, MUSI 173, MUSI 174; co-requisites is MUSI 273.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 272Ear Training IV1.00
Continuation of MUSI 271 with ear training exercises to coincide with material covered in MUSI 274.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is MUSI 271; co-requisite is MUSI 274.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 273Theory III3.00
Continuation of MUSI 174. Study of secondary leading-tone chords, diatonic sequences, and tonicization. Analysis of works and part writing included. Further study of counterpoint will include techniques of four-part imitative and non-imitative polyphonic styles of the Renaissance and Baroque period, learned through analysis and writing.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MUSI 174 and MUSI 172. Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 271 is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 274Theory IV3.00
Continuation of MUSI 273. Study of modal mixture, Neapolitan sixth chords, augmented sixth chords, chromatic modulation, serialism, and study and application of set theory.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MUSI 273 and MUSI 271. Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 272 is required.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 275Composition1.00
Organization of musical ideas into logical and homogeneous form. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MUSI 174, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 289Music Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
MUSI 301Study Abroad1.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the Music Department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes musical performances, preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements, consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
MUSI 304Brass Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for brass ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 305Woodwind Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for woodwind ensembles. Offered to advanced performers provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 307UWS Singers0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for advanced choral musicians. Approximately three to four performance opportunities per semester, both on an off-campus. Field trip participation required. Open to all students by audition. May be repeated for credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 308Percussion Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for percussion ensembles. Offered to advanced performers provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 309Jazz Combo0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for jazz combos. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 310Chorale0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of a variety of choral literature, including choral/orchestral masterworks. Approximately two to three performance opportunities per semester, both on and off-campus. Field trip participation required. Open to all students by audition. May be repeated for credit.credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 311Jazz Ensemble I0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of jazz band literature from the swing era through the most progressive trends. Open to all students by audition. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 312Symphonic Band0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of college band and wind ensemble literature. Open to all students by audition. Some university-owned instruments available. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 313Chamber Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for piano ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 314University Orchestra0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of literature for orchestra and chamber orchestra from the 17th to 20th centuries. Open to all students by audition. Some university-owned instruments available. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 315Chamber Winds0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for mixed ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 316Men's Choir0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for male choir. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 317Opera Workshop0.00 - 1.00
Provides progressive training in the art of music and drama culminating in a performance of opera, operetta, musical theatre, and/or scenes. May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 318Global Percussion Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for steel drum ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
MUSI 320Applied Music-Flute/Piccolo1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Flute/Piccolo. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing of Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 321Applied Music-Oboe/English Horn1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Oboe/English Horn. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing of Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 322Applied Music-Clarinet1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Clarinet. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing of Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 323Applied Music-Saxophone1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Saxophone. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing of Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 324Applied Music-Bassoon1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Bassoon. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 325Applied Music-French Horn1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in French Horn. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 326Applied Music-Trumpet1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Trumpet. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instruments. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 327Applied Music-Trombone/Euphonium1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Trombone/Euphonium. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instruments. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 328Applied Music-Tuba1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Tuba. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instruments. Passing Advanced Standing Eam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 329Applied Music-Percussion1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Percussion. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instruments. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 330Applied Music-Guitar1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Guitar. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instruments. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 331Applied Music-Harp1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Harp. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instruments. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 332Applied Music-Violin1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Violin. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instruments. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 333Applied Music-Viola1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Viola. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 334Applied Music-Cello1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Cello. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing in Applied Music Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 335Applied Music-String Bass1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in String Bass. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing in Applied Music Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 336Applied Music-Piano1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Piano. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing in Applied Music Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 337Applied Music-Organ1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Organ. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing in Applied Music Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 338Applied Music-Harpsichord1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Harpsichord. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing in Applied Music Exam is required to take this course.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is passing of Advanced Standing Exam in Applied Music.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 339Applied Music-Voice1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Voice.Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing in Applied Music Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 351Brass Repertory/Pedagogy1.00
Study of repertoire and pedagogy for various brass instruments. Instructor consent is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 352Woodwind Repertory/Pedagogy1.00
Study of repertoire and pedagogy for various woodwind instruments. Instructor consent is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 353Piano Repertory1.00
Study of repertoire for solo piano. May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 354Organ Repertory/Pedagogy1.00
Study of repertoire and pedagogy for Organ. May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 355String Repertory/Pedagogy1.00
Study of repertoire and pedagogy for various string instruments. Instructor consent is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 356Vocal Repertory1.00
Study of repertoire for solo voice.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 357Percussion Repertory/Pedagogy1.00
Study of repertoire and pedagogy for percussion. Instructor consent is required to take this course. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 362Music History I3.00
The study of the development of music literature in the Western world from Antiquity through the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, and Pre-Classical. Acquaints students with major forms and styles of music with formal and harmonic analysis of selected examples. Illustrative materials include recordings and scores. Attention given to placing composers and musical styles within historical contexts.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MUSI 274
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 363Music History II3.00
ontinuation of MUSI 362. The study of the development of music literature in the Western world from Classical through the Romantic, Post-Romantic, Twentieth Century and Twenty-First Century. Acquaints students with major forms and styles of music with formal and harmonic analysis of selected examples. Illustrative materials include recordings and scores. Attention given to placing composers and musical styles within historical contexts.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MUSI 274
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 365Music History III3.00
Continuation of MUSI 364. Includes the transition to the Romantic through the modern periods. Illustrative materials include recordings and scores. Required listening.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MUSI 364 and MUSI 274.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 367Marching Band Techniques1.00
Curriculum, materials and organization of the Marching Band component of instrumental music for the secondary school.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
MUSI 370Vocal Pedagogy2.00
Study of vocal technique and physiology as it pertains to singing and the teaching of singing. This will be achieved through lectures, readings, discussions, written assignments, teaching and observations.
Prerequisites:
Co-requisite for taking this course is enrollment in MUSI 239, MUSI 339, or MUSI 439.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
MUSI 372Counterpoint2.00
Techniques of 2-, 3-, and 4-part imitative and non-imitative polyphonic styles of the Renaissance and Baroque period, learned through analysis and writing. Students will use their knowledge by arranging and adapting this music to meet the needs and ability levels of school music ensembles.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MUSI 274.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 374Orchestration2.00
Theoretical study of musical instruments. Scoring for band and orchestra and arranging/adapting music for a variety of performance situations.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MUSI 274.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
MUSI 379Jazz Band Techniques1.00
Study of the essential skills required of jazz educators, with a primary focus on teaching jazz at the middle school and high school level. Survey of jazz ensemble literature.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is admittance to Music Major with Junior class standing.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
MUSI 380Conducting I2.00
Introduction to the art of conducting with a focus on the grammar of conducting, communication through gesture, and score study.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MUSI 271 and 273
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MUSI 381Conducting II2.00
Continuation of MUSI 380 with emphasis on techniques used in conducting instrumental ensembles.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MUSI 380.
MUSI 389Music Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
MUSI 390Conducting II1.00
Continuation of MUSI 380 with emphasis on advanced techniques used while conducting ensembles in the student's primary area: band, choral, or orchestral.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MUSI 380
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
MUSI 391Keyboard Accompanying1.00
Extensive individual or group study in the theory and practice of musical performance, conducting, or musical group organization and promotion. Projects are designed in consultation with the instructor and/or the student's advisor. May be repeated for credit. Audition and consent of Music Faculty are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 392Jazz Improvisation1.00
Extensive individual or group study in the theory and practice of musical performance, conducting, or musical group organization and promotion. Projects are designed in consultation with the instructor and/or the student's advisor. May be repeated for credit. Audition and consent of Music Faculty are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 394Piano Technology1.00
Study of basic piano operation and maintenance with opportunity for hands-on experience.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
MUSI 395Half Recital1.00
Public performance of a 30-minute program of serious musical content. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 420Applied Music-Flute/Piccolo4.00
Private instruction in Flute/Piccolo. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 421Applied Music-Oboe/English Horn4.00
Private instruction in Oboe/English Horn. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 422Applied Music-Clarinet4.00
Private instruction in Clarinet. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Audition and Music Faculty consent are required to enroll in this course. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 423Applied Music-Saxophone4.00
Private instruction in Saxophone. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 424Applied Music-Bassoon4.00
Private instruction in Bassoon. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 425Applied Music-French Horn4.00
Private instruction in French Horn. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 426Applied Music-Trumpet4.00
Private instruction in Trumpet. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 427Applied Music-Trombone/Euphonium4.00
Private instruction in Trombone/Euphonium. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 428Applied Music-Tuba4.00
Private instruction in Tuba. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 429Applied Music-Percussion4.00
Private instruction in Percussion. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 430Applied Music-Guitar4.00
Private instruction in Guitar. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 431Applied Music-Harp4.00
Private instruction in Harp. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 432Applied Music-Violin4.00
Private instruction in Violin. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 433Applied Music-Viola4.00
Private instruction in Viola. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 434Applied Music-Cello4.00
Private instruction in Cello. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 435Applied Music-String Bass4.00
Private instruction in String Bass. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 436Applied Music-Piano4.00
Private instruction in Piano. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 437Applied Music-Organ4.00
Private instruction in Organ. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 439Applied Music-Voice4.00
Private instruction in Voice. Open to performance majors only. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument. Passing Advanced Standing Exam is required to take this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 489Music Elective0.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
MUSI 490Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
For advanced music students who have shown themselves capable of independent work. Research topic selected in consultation with the faculty member who will supervise the student.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 495Full Recital2.00
Public performance of a 60-minute program of serious musical content.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of MUSI 395 and permission of faculty in area of applied study.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 498Music Capstone Experience0.00
Public presentation or performance of student's capstone project.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
NSED - Natural Sciences Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
NSED 189Natural Science Education Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
NSED 289Natural Science Education Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
NSED 321Teaching Elementary/Middle School Science3.00
Study of the theories, models and strategies for teaching science concepts and skills to elementary/middle school children (grades K-9). National and state standards guide the conceptual framework for this course. Peer-to-Peer teaching required. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Teacher Education Program and Completion of T ED 300 (C or Better)
Typically Offered:
Fall &/or Spr Depend on Enroll
NSED 339Secondary Methods in Science Education3.00
General principles and problems of teaching science in the secondary schools. Emphasis on organizing teaching activities, teaching materials, resources, and current methodology. Pre-Student Clinical required. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors.
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Teacher Education Program and Completion of T ED 300 (C or Better). Teacher Education Non-Academic Test (TB and Criminal Background Check)
Typically Offered:
Selected Spring Terms Only
NSED 389Natural Science Education Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credit ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
PHIL - Philosophy
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
PHIL 151Introduction To Philosophy3.00
Philosophy concerns some of the most fundamental questions: Why do human beings exist? Does everything have a cause? Can you think without language? What does it mean to live a good life? What is the nature of freedom? Are humans truly free? We will consider these questions and more through exploring perspectives from around the globe, from the ancient to the contemporary.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 160Philosophy and Film3.00
In this course we will view films with philosophical themes and pair them with readings that help us to consider those themes more deeply. Readings will be at the introductory level; and films will include everything from the artsy to the absurd.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 189Philosophy Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHIL 211Contemporary Moral Problems3.00
Are all acts inherently selfish? Should everyone follow the same moral laws? Do we need God to tell us how to behave? Why should we be good and what does that even mean? Should all living creatures be treated equally? In this course we will entertain questions like these as we apply moral theories to a selection of contemporary issues (for example, human rights, environmental ethics, the global sex trade, the death penalty). A key concern will be our ethical responsibilities in the diverse contemporary global theater. Offered on-line only.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
PHIL 212Critical Thinking3.00
The central objective of this course is to help students understand a diverse array of critical thinking styles. This course emphasizes that the type of thinking one applies depends heavily on one’s objective, cultural context, and personal style. These goals will be addressed through a series of modules, each one demonstrating different methods of engaging with ideas to determine their value, falsity, and/or truth. Students will be exposed to methods of reasoning in a variety of historical and cultural contexts. Students will be required: to reflect on their own decision-making process; to identify, evaluate and apply diverse perspectives; to connect and contrast different worldviews; and understand the historical sources of, and to demonstrate openness to, dissimilar worldviews.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHIL 255Environmental Ethics3.00
This course explores different ethical and philosophical approaches to human-environment relations, and their implications for long-term ecological sustainability. Topics include wilderness, climate ethics and politics, food ethics, individual vs. collective action, indigenous relationships to the land, pets, and consumption.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
PHIL 262Introduction to Political Thought3.00
This course exposes students to some of the classic pieces in this field of political theory and teaches them how to work with theoretical and philosophical texts that continue to shape, inform, and challenge the analysis of current political phenomena today. Through these texts, the course introduces questions about the nature of human beings, the roots of government authority, the best regime, and the circumstances of legitimate revolution as well as ideals such as liberty, equality, rights, and justice. Cross-listed as PHIL/POLS 262.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 289Philosophy Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHIL 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. Also, for specific degree requirements, please consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if the content is different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHIL 330Social Justice3.00
Students will investigate what it means to be concerned with social justice, and how to motivate oneself and others to make desired social change. Central concerns will include: identifying and addressing inequalities of power, self-reflection regarding one’s social location, non-hierarchical organizations, and recognizing the value of diversity. This course will be relevant to those with interests in a variety of careers including: education, social work, non-profits, government, and community activism.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 340Enlightenment, Freedom and Alienation (19th Century Philosophy)3.00
In this course we will read philosophers who are concerned with our liberation from inherited, imprisoning belief systems. As such, special attention will be given to the philosophical question of freedom, its limits, and its use as a basis for rationality, morality, and politics. This course will focus primarily on philosophers from the Enlightenment (Kant) through German Idealism (Hegel) Schelling, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Marx and Husserl.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of any 100 or 200 level PHIL course or POLS 262, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
PHIL 350The Self-Unconcealed (20th Century Philosophy)3.00
"Know thyself" seems like good advice. But what does it mean to know yourself? Aren't some aspects of ourselves hidden from us? Do others know us in ways that we can never know ourselves? This course is an exploration of (mostly 20th Century Continental) philosophers notions of the self/subjectivity. Interestingly, they consider the self as something fundamentally concealed/hidden/absent from oneself. Our ongoing question will be; how can we have any self-knowledge in light of these ideas? Philosophers we will consider may include: Husserl, Sartre, Levinas, and Derrida.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of any 100 or 200 level PHIL course or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
PHIL 351Selected Topics3.00
In-depth study of a particular problem, philosopher or period of current interest. May be repeated for up to nine credits provided topics are different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHIL 365Philosophy of Love and Sex3.00
In this course we will begin with the assumption that love and sex cannot be reduced to "a commotion of one's anatomy." Instead we will consider them as two of the most meaningful aspects of human existence, as our most intimate and profound ways of relating to others and to ourselves. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 365.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 389Philosophy Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHIL 459Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering3.00
This course will explore pregnancy, childbirth, and mothering from two perspectives-the embodied experience of women and its political-social context. We will consider how women's firsthand experiences of motherhood are responses to a broader social milieu. This approach will enable us to think about a variety of philosophical themes and questions with regard to our topic including: philosophical method, embodiment, sex and gender, the origins of ethics, moral obligation, virtue, moral luck, intersubjectivity, and oppression. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 459.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
PHIL 489Philosophy Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHIL 490Independent Study1.00 - 3.00
Individually supervised reading and study of a topic or problem of student interest. A paper is required.
Prerequisites:
Consent of cooperating Instructor and Department Chair.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
PHYS - Physics
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
PHYS 100Astronomy4.00
Includes a brief history of astronomy, the study of the motions and structures of the Earth, the moon, the sun, planets, stars and galaxies and consideration of cosmological theories. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science laboratory class. Offered on campus Fall Terms only, and on line Spring Terms.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHYS 107Algebra-Based Physics I4.00
Newtonian mechanics and waves. Designed for students majoring in the humanities, education, medical sciences, or biological sciences. Not open to students with a major in Chemistry or Mathematics. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science laboratory class.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Prerequisites:
MATH 102, 113 or 115 with grade of C-or better or math placement test is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHYS 108Algebra-Based Physics II4.00
Continuation of PHYS 107 covering electricity, magnetism, and light. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
PHYS 107 or 201 with a grade of C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHYS 160Physical Science4.00
Laboratory-oriented course covering the basic concepts of physics and chemistry. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Sciences laboratory class, recommended for elementary education majors. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) Offered Fall Term on-line and Spring Term on-campus
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHYS 189Physics Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHYS 201Calculus-Based Physics I5.00
Newtonian mechanics, waves and thermodynamics. Meets the University Studies Program requirement for Natural Science laboratory class. (Lecture four hours, laboratory two hours.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 240.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHYS 202Calculus-Based Physics II5.00
Electricity, magnetism, and light. (Lecture four hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 241 and PHYS 201 or PHYS 205.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHYS 205Calculus Applications in Introductory Physics I1.00
Supplemental to introductory non-calculus-based PHYS 107 course. Covers the calculus applications which are normally covered in the calculus-based course Physics 201. Students who have taken PHYS 107 may decide to supplement their physics background with this course to gain access to higher level courses which have calculus-based physics as a pre-requisite.
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 107, Math 240 and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 206Calculus Applications in Introductory Physics II1.00
Supplemental to introductory non-calculus based PHYS 108. Covers the calculus applications which are normally covered in the calculus-based course PHYS 202. Students who have taken PHYS 108 may decide to supplement their physics background with this course to gain access to higher-level courses which have calculus-based physics as a pre-requisite.
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 108, MATH 241 and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 281Selected Topics1.00 - 6.00
May be offered for individualized or multiple-student instruction on a particular topic. May be independent study, lecture or laboratory. Topics(s) selected based on student interest with approval of instructor. Prerequisites: At least one semester of physics. Offered upon sufficient demand.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 289Physics Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHYS 300History and Philosophy of Science3.00
Examines the nature of science, the history of science, and the nature and history of the impact of science on human life and thought. Provides some understanding of the methods of science, the difference between science and pseudo science, the political and ideological uses of science, and the moral responsibilities of scientists and science educators. Cross listed as PHIL/PHYS 300.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHYS 311Mechanics4.00
Classical mechanics, mathematical techniques using vector calculus, conservation laws and their relation to symmetry principles, rigid body dynamics, accelerated coordinate systems, and introduction to the generalized coordinate formalisms of LaGrange and Hamiltion. (Lecture four hours.)
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 241 and PHYS 201 or 205 is required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 321Electrical Circuits and Electronics2.00 - 4.00
Laboratory based course in analog and digital circuits, AC and DC circuits, resonance, filters, transistors, operational amplifies, logic, memory, microprocessors and computer architecture.
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 202 or 206 or instructor Consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 325Wave Motion and Optics3.00
Wave phenomena with specific applications to plane electromagnetic waves, reflection, refraction, guided waves and the process of radiation.
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 202 or 206 or instructor Consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 375Physics Laboratory1.00 - 3.00
Extended laboratory experiments selected to give experiences in advanced physics concepts and techniques. Experiments are agreed upon between the instructor and student. (Laboratory two-six hours.) May be repeated when topics are different. Instructor consent required for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 381Intermediate Topics1.00 - 6.00
May be offered for individualized or multiple-student instruction on a particular topic. May be independent study, lecture or laboratory. Topic(s) selected based on student interest with approval of instructor. May be repreated when topics are different.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 241 and PHYS 201 or 205 is required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 389Physics Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHYS 398Physics Tutorial Project1.00 - 4.00
Tutoring students in 100-level physics courses under supervision of a physics staff member. (Three hours per week per credit.)
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 108 or 202.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 401Modern Physics3.00
Non-classical phenomena and their explanation in relativity and quantum mechanics. Topics include Special Relativity, relativistic transformations, E=mc2 spacetime, wave-particle duality of matter and light, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, Schrodinger's equation, atomic physics, quantum numbers, spin, nuclear physics, radioactivity, nuclear forces, and the Standard Model.
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 202 or PHYS 206.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 448Atomic And Quantum Physics4.00
Introduction to the philosophy and mathematics of quantum mechanics, including uncertainty, wave-particle duality, problem solving in tunneling and boundary conditions, time-dependent wave functions, the quantum mechanics of hydrogen, alkali metals, and chemical bonding. (Lecture four hours.)
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 202 or 206 or instructor Consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 481Special Topics1.00 - 6.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in physics selected by the faculty on the basis of community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study. May be repeated when topics are different. Instructor consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 489Physics Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHYS 491Physics Research1.00 - 4.00
Individual laboratory and/or theoretical investigation of a problem selected by the student and faculty or other skilled supervisor. The project will include study of related literature and formal reporting. Designed to give junior/senior level students practical experience in physics research. May be repeated for a total of four credits. Instructor Consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
POLS - Political Science
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
POLS 100Introduction to Political Science3.00
Politics is often perceived as cynical and subsidiary from the normative interaction of society. But what is politics? What is the role of politics in society? What is the relationship between politics and government? To what extent does politics influence human relations and the ways in which government and its institutions function? The course will examine these questions by focusing on one topic each semester. Each of these topics--such as the concept of borders, citizenship, globalization, immigration, etc.--represents a central debate in politics, and introduces some of the current concerns in our world today.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
POLS 101Introduction to Comparative Politics3.00
The recent history of Afghanistan has highlighted the complexities of national and state building. This course explores these two terms and what they mean. Is there a single universal definition and a singular path to modernity or are there multiple definitions and pathways to modernity? The first part of the course will examine the various theories of development with this question in mind. The second part of the course will focus on one developing country. By concentrating on their development pattern we draw out some lessons about tensions and contradictions that accompany development.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 102Civic Literacy, Engagement and Education3.00
: Examines how civic values, dispositions, and practices affect the quality of a democracy, with attention to democratic participation beyond the ballot box, media literacy, patterns of civic engagement, policy making institutions at the national, state and local levels, creating democratic institutions and procedures, democracy simulations, and decision-making.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
POLS 150Sex, Scandal, and Corruption in U.S. Politics3.00
This course examines what constitutes a political scandal, why a certain scandal can become ‘viral,’ and investigate the progression of major scandals throughout American history. Also included is a discussion of the implications for trust and legitimacy, the immediate and long-term consequences of scandal, and the different responses to corruption used by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Through this lens, students will gain an understanding of the workings of American National Government.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
POLS 175The Making of the Modern Global System3.00
Is another world possible? Could we have inherited a different global order? We examine the pillars of current global order, such as the rise of capitalism, emergence of state, violence, imperialism, rise and fall of dominant states, and emergence of democratic values and institutions. We particularly examine how we as individuals interact and help maintain the current global order with an understanding that we can change the current order for a better order in the future. The second part of the course examines various theories of how to understand the global order ranging from realism, liberalism, Marxism, to globalization, human security and feminism.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
POLS 180Public Education Politics and Policy3.00
A study of the importance of public education as a public good and a right; policy making institutions at both the national and state level; and analysis of the output—public education outcomes with an emphasis on how schools are funded in the US and its implications for present and future.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
POLS 189Political Science Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
POLS 230U.S. National, State and Local Government3.00
Structure of American government on the national, state and local levels; federalism; behavior patterns of public officials; modes of citizen participation. Meets DPI requirements. Not open to Political Science majors.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
POLS 240Bioterrorism: A Case in Public Policy Making3.00
What role does government play in preparing for a potential biowarfare/bioterrorist act? Preventing such attacks or outbreaks? This course reviews the powers of the state to prevent and respond to attacks, including a background in the history, origins, motivations, and techniques used by terrorists. The course will cover the potential for biowarfare/bioterrorist acts, how destruction is produced, and government preparedness, response, and recovery from such attacks. Bioterrorism and its various dimensions is the primary focus and thus topics covered in this class. For most weeks, however, we will ask (and attempt to answer) the question ‘what role does/should government have in addressing this issue?’
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
POLS 260Contemporary Issues in American Politics3.00
Same-sex marriage, welfare reform, stem cell research, urban poverty, the legalization of medical marijuana...these and other contemporary issues incite tremendous passion among the public, leading to policy debates, disputes over the role of government in American society and controversial social policy. This course goes beyond the surface-level debates and explores the political and social context of contemporary political controversies as well as the ramifications of government policies.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
POLS 262Introduction to Political Thought3.00
This course exposes students to some of the classic pieces in this field of political theory and teaches them how to work with theoretical and philosophical texts that continue to shape, inform, and challenge the analysis of current political phenomena today. Through these texts, the course introduces questions about the nature of human beings, the roots of government authority, the best regime, and the circumstances of legitimate revolution as well as ideals such as liberty, equality, rights, and justice. Cross-listed as PHIL/POLS 262.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
POLS 264War and Peace in Bosnia3.00
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of various theories of the causes of conflict and conflict resolution within the specific historical context of the disintegration of Yugoslavia during the 1990s, and particularly the Bosnian was of 1992-95. Using those historical events and the questions they raise as a test-case, the course will try to come to some general conclusions about the nature and causes of ethnic conflict and how it differs from interstate conflict; the reasons for and methods of international intervention, including negotiation, arbitration, adjudication, and mediation; the factors that contribute to the success or failure of various methods of intervention and conflict resolution; the challenges involved in re-building societies after war; and the long-term prospects for fostering peace, security, justice, and human rights through such efforts. Code 1. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
POLS 265Contemporary Political Thought3.00
Introduces students to the origin and theoretical background of some of the central debates within political theory. Focus is on topics such as power and authority, nation-state in a global world, sovereignty and control, gender and identity and human rights. By analyzing and understanding some of the common underlying assumptions and beliefs about human nature, society, and state, we will learn about the forces that shape our economic, social and political systems today.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 266War and Peace in Northern Ireland3.00
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of various theories of the causes of conflict and conflict resolution within the general historical context of the rise and demise of the British Empire, and particularly the Northern Ireland question. Using those historical events and the questions they raise as a test-case, the course will try to come to some general conclusions about the nature and causes of ethnic conflict and how it differs from interstate conflict; the reasons for and methods of international intervention, including negotiation, arbitration, adjudication, and mediation; the factors that contribute to the success or failure of various methods of intervention and conflict resolution; the challenges involved in re-building societies after prolonged civil war; and the long-term prospects for fostering peace, security, justice, and human rights through such efforts. Code 1. RE.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
POLS 289Political Science Elective1.00 - 99.00