2019-21 Undergraduate Catalog Course Descriptions

University Studies Courses

Go to:
CA: Communicating Arts
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
COMM 110Introduction to Communication3.00
Introduction to concepts and theories of communication and the application of those theories to interpersonal interactions, small group processes, and public address.
University Studies Requirements:
Communicating Arts
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
DIV: Diversity
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ANTH 310Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective3.00
Examines the cultural construction of gender from an anthropological, cross-cultural perspective. Attention is paid to sociocultural factors such as kinship, colonialism, industrialism, and economic development which influence gender definitions, roles, and the structure of gender relations. Cross-listed as ANTH/GST 310.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ANTH 315Cultural Anthropology3.00
Detailed study of the human condition by focusing on a selection of specific cultures.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ANTH 333The History of Indigenous Peoples3.00
A course on a global history of Indigenous Peoples which will explore the history of conquered and marginalized societies in a world systems context. The course examines their loss of economic resources, environmental security, cultural, linguistic and political sovereignty and their strategies for survival and reemergence as re-empowered peoples. Examples from many regions of the world with many films. Examples may change but the learning goals remain the same. Cross-listed as ANTH/FNS/HIST 333. Code 4. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
ANTH 340Language, Culture, and Society3.00
The study of language and language use as essential elements of human culture, connected to thought, experience, identity, power, and social relations.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ART 224Visual Arts in Non-Western Societies3.00
Study of visual arts in non-western societies including North American Indian/Native American; Mesoamerican; Oceania/Pacific Islands, Asian, and African cultures.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 331African and African Diaspora Art History3.00
A survey of art created by people of African descent. Also discussed are some influences of Islam, Western Europe, and the Caribbean regions.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CJUS 312Gender,Crime,and Justice3.00
Exploration of the social construction of gender in crime and delinquency as well as in justice systems; analysis of how assumptions about female and male natures, as well as appropriate roles and positions in society affect the interpretation and application of law; comparison of women/girls and men/boys as offenders, victims and practitioners. Cross-listed as CJUS/GST 312.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 467Advanced Intercultural Communication3.00
Advanced analysis of the communication dimensions involved in enhancing intercultural interactions. Focus is on identity and communication and their relationship to each other in a diverse world.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ECON 438Comparative Economic Systems3.00
Analysis and development of various forms of economic organization and decision mechanisms at the societal level. Emphasis on modern centralized, decentralized, and mixed economies; evaluation of economic performance; case studies.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 228Multi-Ethnic American Literature3.00
Survey of a variety of multi-ethnic American literatures, including Native American, African-American, Latinx, Chicanx, Asian American, and various European-American writings starting with the oral traditions up to the 21st Century. Typically Offered: Fall and Spring Terms online, Fall or Spring on campus
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
ENGL 229Literature by Women3.00
Survey of British and American women's literature from the Middle Ages to the Contemporary Period. Women's literature across cultures, genres, and time periods.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ENGL 328Multi-Ethnic American Novels3.00
Study of novels by contemporary multi-ethnic American writers.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of 3 credits of ENGL courses.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FNS 110Survey of First Nations Culture3.00
Examination of traditional and contemporary First Nations culture. Includes the legends, religion, poetry, music, design, dance, oratory, and history of tribal groups in North America.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FNS 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 242First Nations Values and Spiritual Beliefs3.00
Examines a broad range of First Nations religious beliefs as they relate to the various cultural values of First Nations in North America. Emphasis on the spiritual significance of First Nations ceremonies and their relationship to the environment. Traditional teachings of First Nations will be examined as they relate to the lifestyles of First Nations people historically and today.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 304First Nations Literature3.00
Examines literature by and about First Nations people. Students read novels, short stories, and poetry by First Nations authors. Students will be made aware of how this literature differs from traditional western literature in content and theme. Also covers traditional stories that contemporary First Nations literature is based on.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 333The History of Indigenous Peoples3.00
A course on a global history of Indigenous Peoples which will explore the history of conquered and marginalized societies in a world systems context. The course examines their loss of economic resources, environmental security, cultural, linguistic and political sovereignty and their strategies for survival and reemergence as re-empowered peoples. Examples from many regions of the world with many films. Examples may change but the learning goals remain the same. Cross-listed as ANTH/FNS/HIST 333. Code 4. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
FNS 386Working with American Indian Families3.00
Focuses on issues related to contemporary American Indian family life, including recognition of the importance of American Indian tribal contexts and community-based assets; development and implementation of the Indian Child Welfare Act; impact of sovereignty and other social policy issues on American Indian families; and effective social work approaches to use when helping American Indian families. Offers an opportunity to better understand and work more effectively with American Indian families. Open to non-majors and can be used as a General Education diversity requirement. Cross-listed FNS/SOW 386.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 480First Nations Society and Culture: Field Research4.00
Teaches basic social science research techniques and how they apply to the First Nations community. Group or individual field research projects will be completed during the semester.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FYS 124First-Year Seminar-Social Sciences, Diversity3.00
First-Year Seminar
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
GEOG 100World Regional Geography3.00
Develops basic factual knowledge and awareness of the physical and cultural features of the world environment. Explores regional and world scale patterns of resources, climate, applied technology and trade, political alignments, and other aspects of the current world. All world political units are analyzed from a regional perspective. Students gain significant knowledge of world spatial relationships. Offered: Every Fall and Spring Terms on campus; Every Spring Term On Line.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOG 102Cultural Geography3.00
Explores the influence of culture on perceptions, decisions, and interpersonal relations on both planetary and local scales of life. A broad range of cultural topics are considered, including the origins of culture, human development, political and social organization, religions and languages, and evolving human landscapes. Prepares students to be well-informed citizens of our increasingly interconnected global community. Offered On Campus Spring Terms and On Line Fall Terms.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GST 150Introduction to Gender Studies3.00
Introduction to Gender Studies explores various answers to the question: How does gender influence the way in which we interact with and are impacted by society? To that end, this course introduces students to feminist perspectives and challenges students to incorporate self-exploration with academic skill to analyze one's personal experience, and the experience of others, within social institutions such as family, government, employment, religion, and education through the lens of gender. We will examine how issues of gender within our society intersect with race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, differing abilities, and age to perpetuate a system of oppression.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GST 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/GST 210.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GST 255Gender and Sexuality in Writing3.00
Explores writing on gender and sexuality with a focus on texts by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex (LGBTQI) and allied writers from diverse cultures, classes, races, and ethnicities. Students discover and deepen their own perspectives through writing and reading. Students of all genders and gender identities are welcome. Cross listed as WRIT/GST 255. Course includes Academic Service-Learning (AS-L) high-impact practice.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 258Gender, Psychology and Society3.00
Discussion and study of development of gender roles across the lifespan. Topics include the social construction of sex and gender differences, status and power, feminist psychology, childhood and adolescence, relationships, family, work and achievement, and diversity. Meets the Diverse Perspectives requirement for Psychology major. Meets a requirement for the Gender Studies minor. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course, involving a 15-hour community placement commitment (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). Cross-listed as PSYC/GST 258.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GST 270Psychology of Men and Masculinity3.00
This course is devoted to exploring men's experience in society, the cultural messages men receive about masculinity, and the implications of these for behavior and mental health. Topics include: ideology about the transition from boyhood to manhood, the privileges and perils of manhood status, men's friendships, work primacy, health issues, intimacy and power issues with women, negotiating male sexuality, male violence, and assumptions regarding men's role in the family unit. This is a course for both women and men about issues related to the social construction of masculinity in our culture. Cross-listed as PSYC/GST 270. Meets the Diverse Perspectives requirement for Psychology major.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
GST 310Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective3.00
Examines the cultural construction of gender from an anthropological, cross-cultural perspective. Attention is paid to sociocultural factors such as kinship, colonialism, industrialism, and economic development which influence gender definitions, roles, and the structure of gender relations. Cross-listed as ANTH/GST 310.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
GST 312Gender,Crime,and Justice3.00
Exploration of the social construction of gender in crime and delinquency as well as in justice systems; analysis of how assumptions about female and male natures, as well as appropriate roles and positions in society affect the interpretation and application of law; comparison of women/girls and men/boys as offenders, victims and practitioners. Cross-listed as CJUS/GST 312.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GST 322The Construction of Gender in the United States3.00
An examination of gender and sexual identities and roles in the United States from colonial times through the present. Explores the evolution of these roles and identities and the social, economic, and political forces that shape them. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 322. G.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 365Philosophy of Love and Sex3.00
In this course we will begin with the assumption that love and sex cannot be reduced to "a commotion of one's anatomy." Instead we will consider them as two of the most meaningful aspects of human existence, as our most intimate and profound ways of relating to others and to ourselves. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 365.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GST 374Women and Politics3.00
In the United States, women hold 18% of the seats in the 112th Congress, marking the nation 85th in its level of representation for women. Globally, women constitute 15% of all members of parliament, although significant regional variation persists. How do gendered hierarchies continue to shape and structure political systems? Why have women not yet reached parity in elected office? Should women be represented as women? What difference do women bring to elective office? These and other questions are explored throughout the course, with particular attention to the historical exclusion of women from the public arena, the methods used by women to enter electoral and activist politics, and the current political status of women in the United States and globally. Cross-listed as POLS/GST 374.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
GST 393Women, Colonialism, and Nationalism in Modern Southeast Asia3.00
This upper-division seminar examines the role women played in Southeast Asian history from the 19th century till the present, specifically as the region confronted the challenges of colonialism and post-colonial nation-building. Among key issues covered are (1) the encounter between Western guns and local political systems; (2) race and racism (or, why the other group is always a barbarian); (3) how Southeast Asia became “modern”; (4) decolonization and/or revolution; (4) political, economic and religious challenges in post-colonial nationalism; (5) the intimate and everyday lives of Southeast Asians; and so on. We will work through these themes through the lens of the role of women and women’s groups, examining Western tourists, governesses and wives; sex, prostitution and the control of VD; colonial-era marriage with “white guys” and the biracial children; Islam and women; and post-colonial women political leaders. We will examine these issues within the framework of the political, social, economic and cultural interactions between Britain, France, Holland, the United States of America, China, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar/Burma. In addition to reading a selection of secondary and primary materials, including poems, biographies, memoirs, and histories, students will also watch music videos and films to understand and analyze the issues. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 393. Code 3. G.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
GST 459Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering3.00
This course will explore pregnancy, childbirth, and mothering from two perspectives-the embodied experience of women and its political-social context. We will consider how women's firsthand experiences of motherhood are responses to a broader social milieu. This approach will enable us to think about a variety of philosophical themes and questions with regard to our topic including: philosophical method, embodiment, sex and gender, the origins of ethics, moral obligation, virtue, moral luck, intersubjectivity, and oppression. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 459.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 113Soccer and identity: A Global History3.00
This course focuses on the social, cultural and political impact of soccer across the world. It tackles issues of racial, ethnic, class and geographic identities as well as gender dynamics through an examination of the development of soccer, and its iconic rivalries. It traces the history and development of the game in various parts of the world – Asia, Africa, North America, South America and Europe. Students engage in critical analysis of a range of sources: academic and popular non-fiction books; scholarly journal articles; newspaper and magazine articles; fan literature (blogs, fanzines, FB groups etc); and audio-visual materials (films, documentaries and matches). Students learn how to use these verifiable historical evidence to construct reasoned interpretations of the human past. In discussion sessions and other classroom activities, students are encouraged to explore how interpretations of the past can be applied to address contemporary issues and problems.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 115World Religions3.00
A course on the history or world religions, some great and some small: Abrahamic, Dharmic, Indigenous faiths and religions of the Tao. The course stresses links between faiths and their historic origins. All faiths are equally respected. It is NOT a debate about which faith is true or better than another. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 119Kings, Concubines, Thinkers, Farmers in East Asia3.00
China, Japan and Korea make up one of the fastest growing regions today. We buy all sorts of stuff made in China; text on our Samsung phones; drive our Hondas, Toyotas, and Hyundais; listen to K-pop; watch Jackie Chan and cheered on Yao Ming; read manga comics and watch anime; consume dim sum and chow mein, ramen and sushi, kimchi and bibimbop. This course seeks to understand what makes these societies tick; societies that share many similarities but are continually asserting their unique linguistic, cultural and political identities. We reach back to the pre-modern period to examine the lives of the elite (emperors, princes, generals, poets, philosophers) and everyday folks (soldiers and samurais, farmers, traders, monks, concubines). The course will use a diverse range of sources, from scholarly articles and memoirs to documentaries, movies and music videos. The course centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, presentations, critical thinking, as well as short- and medium-length essays. It introduces students to the study and discipline of history. Code 3
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 154African-American Voices3.00
Explores the African-American experience over the past two centuries with an emphasis on social and political discourse. The ideas of major political, literary, cultural and intellectual figures, as well as the content of black folk and popular culture, will be examined in a social and historical context. Authors include Douglass, DuBois, Hurston, Garvey, King, Malcolm X, and bell hooks. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 181The Muslim World3.00
Survey-level course introduces students to a variety of topics about the Muslim world from multidisciplinary perspectives. The time and life of the prophet Muhammad, the rise of great Islamic empires, Islam and women, the spread of Islam in America and the explosion of Islamic resurgence and extremism are all topics for consideration. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
HIST 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
HIST 322The Construction of Gender in the United States3.00
An examination of gender and sexual identities and roles in the United States from colonial times through the present. Explores the evolution of these roles and identities and the social, economic, and political forces that shape them. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 322. G.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 333The History of Indigenous Peoples3.00
A course on a global history of Indigenous Peoples which will explore the history of conquered and marginalized societies in a world systems context. The course examines their loss of economic resources, environmental security, cultural, linguistic and political sovereignty and their strategies for survival and reemergence as re-empowered peoples. Examples from many regions of the world with many films. Examples may change but the learning goals remain the same. Cross-listed as ANTH/FNS/HIST 333. Code 4. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
HIST 393Women, Colonialism, and Nationalism in Modern Southeast Asia3.00
This upper-division seminar examines the role women played in Southeast Asian history from the 19th century till the present, specifically as the region confronted the challenges of colonialism and post-colonial nation-building. Among key issues covered are (1) the encounter between Western guns and local political systems; (2) race and racism (or, why the other group is always a barbarian); (3) how Southeast Asia became “modern”; (4) decolonization and/or revolution; (4) political, economic and religious challenges in post-colonial nationalism; (5) the intimate and everyday lives of Southeast Asians; and so on. We will work through these themes through the lens of the role of women and women’s groups, examining Western tourists, governesses and wives; sex, prostitution and the control of VD; colonial-era marriage with “white guys” and the biracial children; Islam and women; and post-colonial women political leaders. We will examine these issues within the framework of the political, social, economic and cultural interactions between Britain, France, Holland, the United States of America, China, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar/Burma. In addition to reading a selection of secondary and primary materials, including poems, biographies, memoirs, and histories, students will also watch music videos and films to understand and analyze the issues. Cross-listed as HIST/GST 393. Code 3. G.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 395Modern India: From Gandhi to Slumdog Millionaire3.00
This course examines the impact of colonialism on the Indian subcontinent and on the formation of the modern India. We will also explore contemporary post-colonial themes such as the urbanization of India, the question of Indian-ness in the face of a growing and prosperous global Indian diaspora (or, why there is an Indian restaurant in just about any town in the US). This course is mainly conducted as a seminar in which students take the lead in presenting and discussing the material. The aim is not just to foster a higher level of critical reading, writing, thinking and speaking, but to also refine professional work habits. Code 3. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
LSTU 365Race, Class, Gender and the Law3.00
Explores how the law has interacted with, impacted and affected race, ethnicity, gender and class issues in the United States context. Students read and criticize key legal cases, explore arguments made in legal settings about race/ethnicity/class/gender, examine the areas of silence or inaction by the law and assess the current interconnection between race, ethnicity, class, gender and the law. Fulfills diversity requirement of General Education.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
MUSI 161Music and World Culture3.00
Survey of non-Western musical cultures, including ethnic origins of folk and traditional music in America. Required listening. Open to all students.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 266Jazz Appreciation3.00
History of jazz from its beginnings to its most progressive trends, using compositions and recordings to trace its stylistic and technical developments. Open to all students.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHIL 330Social Justice3.00
Students will investigate what it means to be concerned with social justice, and how to motivate oneself and others to make desired social change. Central concerns will include: identifying and addressing inequalities of power, self-reflection regarding one’s social location, non-hierarchical organizations, and recognizing the value of diversity. This course will be relevant to those with interests in a variety of careers including: education, social work, non-profits, government, and community activism.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 365Philosophy of Love and Sex3.00
In this course we will begin with the assumption that love and sex cannot be reduced to "a commotion of one's anatomy." Instead we will consider them as two of the most meaningful aspects of human existence, as our most intimate and profound ways of relating to others and to ourselves. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 365.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 459Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering3.00
This course will explore pregnancy, childbirth, and mothering from two perspectives-the embodied experience of women and its political-social context. We will consider how women's firsthand experiences of motherhood are responses to a broader social milieu. This approach will enable us to think about a variety of philosophical themes and questions with regard to our topic including: philosophical method, embodiment, sex and gender, the origins of ethics, moral obligation, virtue, moral luck, intersubjectivity, and oppression. Cross-listed as PHIL/GST 459.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
POLS 374Women and Politics3.00
In the United States, women hold 18% of the seats in the 112th Congress, marking the nation 85th in its level of representation for women. Globally, women constitute 15% of all members of parliament, although significant regional variation persists. How do gendered hierarchies continue to shape and structure political systems? Why have women not yet reached parity in elected office? Should women be represented as women? What difference do women bring to elective office? These and other questions are explored throughout the course, with particular attention to the historical exclusion of women from the public arena, the methods used by women to enter electoral and activist politics, and the current political status of women in the United States and globally. Cross-listed as POLS/GST 374.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
PSYC 258Gender, Psychology and Society3.00
Discussion and study of development of gender roles across the lifespan. Topics include the social construction of sex and gender differences, status and power, feminist psychology, childhood and adolescence, relationships, family, work and achievement, and diversity. Meets the Diverse Perspectives requirement for Psychology major. Meets a requirement for the Gender Studies minor. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course, involving a 15-hour community placement commitment (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). Cross-listed as PSYC/GST 258.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PSYC 270Psychology of Men and Masculinity3.00
This course is devoted to exploring men's experience in society, the cultural messages men receive about masculinity, and the implications of these for behavior and mental health. Topics include: ideology about the transition from boyhood to manhood, the privileges and perils of manhood status, men's friendships, work primacy, health issues, intimacy and power issues with women, negotiating male sexuality, male violence, and assumptions regarding men's role in the family unit. This is a course for both women and men about issues related to the social construction of masculinity in our culture. Cross-listed as PSYC/GST 270. Meets the Diverse Perspectives requirement for Psychology major.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
PSYC 360Culture and Identity3.00
Introduction to the effects of culture on who we are and how we think of ourselves (and others). Central themes: How does culture construct the categories that come to define our identities (e.g., race, gender, class)? How does this differ from one cultural context (i.e., region; nation; continent) to the next? How do these constructs shape our beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors? How does this contribute to intergroup / international conflict and misunderstanding? Classroom activities and assignments are aimed at confronting, acknowledging, questioning, and challenging the automatic assumptions that result from our own singular cultural experience, and experiencing differences in culture. Meets the Diverse Perspectives requirement for the Psychology major.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
SO W 386Working with American Indian Families3.00
Focuses on issues related to contemporary American Indian family life, including recognition of the importance of American Indian tribal contexts and community-based assets; development and implementation of the Indian Child Welfare Act; impact of sovereignty and other social policy issues on American Indian families; and effective social work approaches to use when helping American Indian families. Offers an opportunity to better understand and work more effectively with American Indian families. Open to non-majors and can be used as a General Education diversity requirement. Cross-listed FNS/SOW 386.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SOCI 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/GST 210.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SOCI 273Race and Ethnicity3.00
Examines the social production of racial and ethnic categories as well as the practices that enact these categories. After examining the representation of these categories as "natural," the course uses local and global evidence to investigate the institutional and representational processes that historically create and modify race and ethnicity.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SPAN 315Voices of Hispanic Women3.00
Course taught in Spanish focusing on the lives and experiences of Hispanic women writers, artists, and filmmakers from Latin America, the United States, and Spain. Examines the present status of women as they leave the traditional setting of home and emerge into the public sphere of influence and power. Studies the effects of poverty, war, and revolution on women and their families as well as the impact of immigration on identity and self.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SPAN 202, appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
SPAN 350Latino Culture in the U.S.3.00
This course, taught in Spanish, introduces the art, literature, and history of Chicanos or Mexican-Americans, Puerto-Rican Americans, and Cuban-Americans.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SPAN 202, appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
T ED 270Multicultural Education3.00
Supports an intensive study of issues surrounding inequality and inequities that impact education in the U.S. Critically examines issues related to prejudice and discrimination with attention to intersections of race, ethnicity, cultures, class, gender, and exceptionality in schools. Focuses on anti-oppressive strategies effective in providing all students equitable opportunities to succeed academically. Includes integration of WI American Indian history, culture, sovereignty, and treaty rights into PK-12 curriculum. Academic Service-Learning required. A minimum grade of C in this course is required for all education majors. Typically Offered: Fall and Spring Terms On Campus and Online; Select Summer Terms online and hybrid only
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Prerequisites:
Teacher Education Non-Academic Test (TB and Criminal Background Check)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Summer Terms
T ED 289Teacher Education Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Prerequisites:
Student must be On Campus (not DLC)
T ED 489Teacher Education Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Prerequisites:
Student must be On Campus (not DLC)
WRIT 255Gender and Sexuality in Writing3.00
Explores writing on gender and sexuality with a focus on texts by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex (LGBTQI) and allied writers from diverse cultures, classes, races, and ethnicities. Students discover and deepen their own perspectives through writing and reading. Students of all genders and gender identities are welcome. Cross listed as WRIT/GST 255. Course includes Academic Service-Learning (AS-L) high-impact practice.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
FAA: Fine Arts - Appreciation
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ART 221Art History Survey:The Ancient World to the Renaissance4.00
A study of expression in art and architecture which contribute to the Western cultural tradition.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ART 222Art History Survey:Renaissance to Modern Art4.00
A continuation of ART 221 with emphasis on the changing role of art in Western culture.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
COMM 104Film and Culture3.00
Students will learn to analyze films from aesthetic and cultural perspectives in a survey of motion pictures from their beginning to the present day. A variety of American and/or international films showing significant artistic development will be screened. The on campus course meets for an additional hour per week to accommodate these in class screenings.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
COMM 122Theatre Appreciation3.00
An introduction to live performance through the study of artistic components involved in the theatrical process.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
MUSI 160Music Appreciation3.00
Study of the musical elements, forms, and stylistic periods in Western musical culture. Includes a discussion of composers' lives, individual styles, and representative works. Required listening.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 266Jazz Appreciation3.00
History of jazz from its beginnings to its most progressive trends, using compositions and recordings to trace its stylistic and technical developments. Open to all students.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Fine Arts - Appreciation
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
 
FAAE: Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ART 101Introduction to Art3.00
(For non-Art majors) Introduction to the field of Visual Art through a studio experience. Includes demonstrations, lectures and critiques planned to develop an appreciation of art as well as understanding media as a vehicle of expression.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 125Acting for the Stage3.00
Introduction to the principles of acting for the stage. Students are guided through exercises, concepts and practical acting experience as they unlock their creative potential.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 180Introduction to Technical Theatre3.00
A hands-on approach to the art of stagecraft. Students will learn and apply techniques in set construction, lighting and sound, scenic painting and stage properties for theatre productions.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
COMM 273Oral Interpretation3.00
Introduction to the process of lifting words from the page and giving them dimension in a reader’s voice and body.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HHP 133Social and Square Dance3.00
Fundamentals of various styles and techniques of movement and dance.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 104Brass Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for brass ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 105Woodwind Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for woodwind ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 107UWS Singers0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for advanced choral musicians. Approximately three to four performance opportunities per semester, both on an off-campus. Field trip participation required. Open to all students by audition. May be repeated for credit
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 108Percussion Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
The study and performance of music suitable for percussion ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 109Jazz Combo0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for jazz combos. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 110Chorale0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of a variety of choral literature, including choral/orchestral masterworks. Approximately two to three performance opportunities per semester, both on and off-campus. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 111Jazz Band0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of jazz band literature from the swing era through the most progressive trends. Open to all students by audition. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 112Symphonic Band0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of college band and wind ensemble literature. Open to all students by audition. Some university-owned instruments available. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 113Chamber Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for piano ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 114University Orchestra0.00 - 1.00
Study and preparation for performance of literature for orchestra and chamber orchestra from the 17th to 21st centuries. Open to all students by audition. Some university-owned instruments available. Field trip participation required. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 115Chamber Winds0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for mixed ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 116Men's Choir0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for male choir. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 118Global Percussion Ensemble0.00 - 1.00
Study and performance of music suitable for steel drum ensembles. Offered provided a sufficient number of students register to make a practicable group. May be repeated for credit.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 127Applied Music-Trombone/Euphonium1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Trombone/Euphonium. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 129Applied Music-Percussion1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Percussion. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 130Applied Music-Guitar1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Guitar. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MUSI 131Applied Music-Harp1.00 - 2.00
Private instruction in Harp. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. No fees for full-time music majors studying their major instrument or a required minor instrument. Music minors and non-majors must pay an additional fee for applied study. See current schedule of classes for applicable fees. Audition or consent of instructor is required to enroll in this course.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
WRIT 250Introduction to Creative Writing3.00
Introductory creative writing course in which students develop their ability to write in a variety of genres. Study of contemporary works in genres including literary prose, poetry, and drama; composition in genres including literary prose, poetry, and drama; development of a writing process and writerly identity; workshop critiques of student writing. Course includes Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (URSCA) high-impact practice.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
WRIT 280Writing on Illness3.00
Study and practice of the craft of four main genres of creative writing (poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction), with emphasis on the themes of illness and healthcare; development of a writing process and writerly identity; group discussions of student writing.
University Studies Requirements:
Fine Arts - Aesthetic
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
GLOB: Global Awareness
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ANTH 101The Human Experience3.00
Introduction to the principles, concepts and methods of cultural anthropology. Consideration of the ways in which cultural anthropology contributes to the understanding of human diversity.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ANTH 104The History of Human Origins3.00
A history of human origins from the fish who crawled out of the sea to early hominids to the peopling of the continents. Uses fossil, archaeological, experimental archaeological, linguistic, oral narrative and genetic evidence. Honors the origin narratives of diverse peoples. All religious views welcome. Many films. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST 104. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ANTH 310Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective3.00
Examines the cultural construction of gender from an anthropological, cross-cultural perspective. Attention is paid to sociocultural factors such as kinship, colonialism, industrialism, and economic development which influence gender definitions, roles, and the structure of gender relations. Cross-listed as ANTH/GST 310.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
ANTH 320Environmental Anthropology3.00
Exploration of human-environment interactions across time, space, and diverse cultures. Considers environmental relations involving indigenous, non-Western, and Western groups. Readings address traditional environmental knowledge, changing patterns of subsistence, population, sustainability, urbanism, politics, debates over resources, and more.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ANTH 333The History of Indigenous Peoples3.00
A course on a global history of Indigenous Peoples which will explore the history of conquered and marginalized societies in a world systems context. The course examines their loss of economic resources, environmental security, cultural, linguistic and political sovereignty and their strategies for survival and reemergence as re-empowered peoples. Examples from many regions of the world with many films. Examples may change but the learning goals remain the same. Cross-listed as ANTH/FNS/HIST 333. Code 4. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
ANTH 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica (located in present-day Mexico, Guatemala, and neighboring areas), both past and present, and their transformations and influence across time and borders. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 2.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ART 224Visual Arts in Non-Western Societies3.00
Study of visual arts in non-western societies including North American Indian/Native American; Mesoamerican; Oceania/Pacific Islands, Asian, and African cultures.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ART 331African and African Diaspora Art History3.00
A survey of art created by people of African descent. Also discussed are some influences of Islam, Western Europe, and the Caribbean regions.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ECON 430International Economics3.00
Overview of the economic interactions between countries in areas of international trade and international finance. Topics include: theories of trade, protectionist policies, trade agreements, economic integration, role of international institutions and multinational enterprises, balance of payments, foreign exchange rates, current international macroeconomics and monetary policy.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ECON 438Comparative Economic Systems3.00
Analysis and development of various forms of economic organization and decision mechanisms at the societal level. Emphasis on modern centralized, decentralized, and mixed economies; evaluation of economic performance; case studies.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Prerequisites:
ECON 250 and 251, or ECON 235, or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENGL 241World Literature I3.00
Survey of selected literary works in translation from the Ancient World through the mid-17th Century. Includes works from the Western and non-Western world.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGL 242World Literature II3.00
Survey of selected literary works in translation from the late 17th Century through the Contemporary Period. Includes works from the Western and non-Western world.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 333The History of Indigenous Peoples3.00
A course on a global history of Indigenous Peoples which will explore the history of conquered and marginalized societies in a world systems context. The course examines their loss of economic resources, environmental security, cultural, linguistic and political sovereignty and their strategies for survival and reemergence as re-empowered peoples. Examples from many regions of the world with many films. Examples may change but the learning goals remain the same. Cross-listed as ANTH/FNS/HIST 333. Code 4. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
FNS 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica (located in present-day Mexico, Guatemala, and neighboring areas), both past and present, and their transformations and influence across time and borders. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 2.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GEOG 100World Regional Geography3.00
Develops basic factual knowledge and awareness of the physical and cultural features of the world environment. Explores regional and world scale patterns of resources, climate, applied technology and trade, political alignments, and other aspects of the current world. All world political units are analyzed from a regional perspective. Students gain significant knowledge of world spatial relationships. Offered: Every Fall and Spring Terms on campus; Every Spring Term On Line.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOG 102Cultural Geography3.00
Explores the influence of culture on perceptions, decisions, and interpersonal relations on both planetary and local scales of life. A broad range of cultural topics are considered, including the origins of culture, human development, political and social organization, religions and languages, and evolving human landscapes. Prepares students to be well-informed citizens of our increasingly interconnected global community. Offered On Campus Spring Terms and On Line Fall Terms.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GST 310Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective3.00
Examines the cultural construction of gender from an anthropological, cross-cultural perspective. Attention is paid to sociocultural factors such as kinship, colonialism, industrialism, and economic development which influence gender definitions, roles, and the structure of gender relations. Cross-listed as ANTH/GST 310.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of ANTH 101 or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
HIST 104The History of Human Origins3.00
A history of human origins from the fish who crawled out of the sea to early hominids to the peopling of the continents. Uses fossil, archaeological, experimental archaeological, linguistic, oral narrative and genetic evidence. Honors the origin narratives of diverse peoples. All religious views welcome. Many films. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST 104. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 111Modern World History3.00
Focuses on themes rather than chronology. Students follow the growing globalization of the world through the study of themes like nationalism, industrialization, imperialism, capitalism, decolonization, technologies, gender, race, everyday lives, world systems, migration and Diaspora. Will employ analysis of primary documents, photographs, maps, music, films or other sources of history and build skills of effective writing, clear presentations, use of convincing evidence, increasing geographic literacy and placing the history of specific regions in a global context. Aims to provide an introduction to the discipline of history and its methods. Emphasis on learning to think globally. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 113Soccer and identity: A Global History3.00
This course focuses on the social, cultural and political impact of soccer across the world. It tackles issues of racial, ethnic, class and geographic identities as well as gender dynamics through an examination of the development of soccer, and its iconic rivalries. It traces the history and development of the game in various parts of the world – Asia, Africa, North America, South America and Europe. Students engage in critical analysis of a range of sources: academic and popular non-fiction books; scholarly journal articles; newspaper and magazine articles; fan literature (blogs, fanzines, FB groups etc); and audio-visual materials (films, documentaries and matches). Students learn how to use these verifiable historical evidence to construct reasoned interpretations of the human past. In discussion sessions and other classroom activities, students are encouraged to explore how interpretations of the past can be applied to address contemporary issues and problems.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 115World Religions3.00
A course on the history or world religions, some great and some small: Abrahamic, Dharmic, Indigenous faiths and religions of the Tao. The course stresses links between faiths and their historic origins. All faiths are equally respected. It is NOT a debate about which faith is true or better than another. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 120Conquest and Resistance in Modern Asia3.00
This course examines the impact of one of the key dynamics of late modern history in Asia: colonialism. It takes a comparative look at how imperialism was experienced by the invading power and the colonized people in traditionally lesser-studied regions of the world. We look at a number of case studies of Western and Japanese colonialism from the 19th century onwards, including – (1) the Spanish and the US in the Philippines (2) the British experience in Asia (primarily India but also Burma); (3) the French in Vietnam; (4) The Dutch experience in Indonesia; and finally, (5) the Japanese in China, Taiwan, and Korea, and later during WWII, in Southeast Asia. (Other case studies may also be used.) We examine the social, economic, cultural, political, and personal impact of imperialism on both the metropole and the colony. We will read memoirs, watch music videos and films, and discuss issues such as the nuts and bolts of colonial rule, the role of women, attitudes towards race and identity, indigenous pursuit of modernity, and nationalism among others. Emphasis on learning to think globally and provides University Studies students and majors with an introduction to historical thinking. Code 3
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 125Modern Latin America3.00
An examination of issues of development and underdevelopment using Latin America as a case study. Students will explore a variety of theories of underdevelopment and use Latin American History to weigh the merits of these various theories. Code 2
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 181The Muslim World3.00
Survey-level course introduces students to a variety of topics about the Muslim world from multidisciplinary perspectives. The time and life of the prophet Muhammad, the rise of great Islamic empires, Islam and women, the spread of Islam in America and the explosion of Islamic resurgence and extremism are all topics for consideration. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 333The History of Indigenous Peoples3.00
A course on a global history of Indigenous Peoples which will explore the history of conquered and marginalized societies in a world systems context. The course examines their loss of economic resources, environmental security, cultural, linguistic and political sovereignty and their strategies for survival and reemergence as re-empowered peoples. Examples from many regions of the world with many films. Examples may change but the learning goals remain the same. Cross-listed as ANTH/FNS/HIST 333. Code 4. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
HIST 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica (located in present-day Mexico, Guatemala, and neighboring areas), both past and present, and their transformations and influence across time and borders. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 2.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 385Samurai: A History of Japan3.00
This upper-division course traces the history of Japan through the development of the samurai as a distinct social group over the last millennium. We will focus on the formation of a distinctive Japanese culture and identity through its initial interaction with cultures inhabiting present-day Korea and China; its borrowing and adaptation of political, economic, social, linguistic, religious and educational elements from China and Korea; and the repeated opening and closing of Japan to the outside world over the course of several centuries. We will also look at Japan’s contact with the West, beginning with Dutch traders, the encounter with Commodore Perry’s US naval fleet of Black Ships, and the conflict with the Allies (principally the US) during WWII. We will examine these issues through the lens of samurai culture: exploring the myths and reality of samurais as warriors and bureaucrats, their professional and family lives, and their symbolic meaning within Japanese and popular culture; and so on. We will also consider whether this samurai/Japanese ethos is culturally and geographically specific, or transferable. This seminar-style course uses first person accounts; tales, fables and histories; scholarly articles; and films (not just the great Kurosawa epics, but also lesser-known accounts by Mizoguchi Kenji, Inagaki Hiroshi, Jim Jarmusch, Hirayama, Oshima, Yamada and others). Code 3
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 394Interrogating the Vietnam War: A History of Modern Vietnam (1885-1975)3.00
When we think of the Vietnam War, we think of a critical period in 20th century American history: the swinging 60s, napalm bombs, mysterious Viet Cong fighters, campus protests, the peace movement, and America’s defeat. We may even think of Tom Cruise in Born on the Fourth of July, or that famous picture of desperate people climbing up the ladder to a helicopter on the roof of the US embassy. But there is another side to the war: the “Vietnam” side. This course explores the conflict from that other side. To understand why the Vietnamese took up arms, we examine roughly a century of history beginning with the complete loss of independence to the French in the 1880s and ending with the reunification of the country in 1975. We explore why the Vietnamese resented the French, how young Vietnamese broke with their centuries-long traditions and radicalized, how women found opportunities in a new modernity, how Ho Chi Minh made several efforts to ally with America (and why the US said “No”), and how, ultimately, the US got drawn into a war it had little understanding of. Along the way, we will explore the changing nature of what it means to be Vietnamese on a personal, social and national level, as Vietnamese of different ethnic, class, gender and educational groups, from various geographic areas, confront new forces that re-shape their identities. We will read a mixture of primary and secondary materials, including films, memoirs, recollections, newspaper articles and autobiographies by Vietnamese participants. Code 3. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
MUSI 161Music and World Culture3.00
Survey of non-Western musical cultures, including ethnic origins of folk and traditional music in America. Required listening. Open to all students.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
POLS 100Introduction to Political Science3.00
Politics is often perceived as cynical and subsidiary from the normative interaction of society. But what is politics? What is the role of politics in society? What is the relationship between politics and government? To what extent does politics influence human relations and the ways in which government and its institutions function? The course will examine these questions by focusing on one topic each semester. Each of these topics--such as the concept of borders, citizenship, globalization, immigration, etc.--represents a central debate in politics, and introduces some of the current concerns in our world today.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
POLS 101Introduction to Comparative Politics3.00
The recent history of Afghanistan has highlighted the complexities of national and state building. This course explores these two terms and what they mean. Is there a single universal definition and a singular path to modernity or are there multiple definitions and pathways to modernity? The first part of the course will examine the various theories of development with this question in mind. The second part of the course will focus on one developing country. By concentrating on their development pattern we draw out some lessons about tensions and contradictions that accompany development.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 175The Making of the Modern Global System3.00
Is another world possible? Could we have inherited a different global order? We examine the pillars of current global order, such as the rise of capitalism, emergence of state, violence, imperialism, rise and fall of dominant states, and emergence of democratic values and institutions. We particularly examine how we as individuals interact and help maintain the current global order with an understanding that we can change the current order for a better order in the future. The second part of the course examines various theories of how to understand the global order ranging from realism, liberalism, Marxism, to globalization, human security and feminism.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
POLS 376Theories of Human Rights3.00
This course examines the nature and origin of human rights, as well as the conflicts and debates that result from the different understanding of the concept. We will explore questions such as; Are human rights individual or collective? Are they universal or should instead be understood as culturally sensitive? Do they include positive rights or only negative rights? And what about economic and social rights? Providing answers to these questions will allow us to understand our own political, economic, and social beliefs, as well as approaches that are different from ours. In order to answer these questions, the course will combine discussions about the concept of human rights with analyses of current cases of human rights violations around the world, including the origin of these violations, desired changes, politics, and effective actions.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
SOCI 201Global Social Problems3.00
Why do such profound socioeconomic differences exist among nations, particularly so-called developed and developing countries? Why do these differences seem to be permanent? What keeps developing countries from developing? What is the relationship between development and environmental crisis? In this class, we will explore these questions and more by studying the social relationships behind the production of everyday things.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SPAN 303Latin American Culture and Civilization3.00
Study in the cultural production of Latin American literature, music, art, and film in the context of contemporary Latin-American history.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SPAN 202, appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
 
HH: Humanities - History
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ANTH 104The History of Human Origins3.00
A history of human origins from the fish who crawled out of the sea to early hominids to the peopling of the continents. Uses fossil, archaeological, experimental archaeological, linguistic, oral narrative and genetic evidence. Honors the origin narratives of diverse peoples. All religious views welcome. Many films. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST 104. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 104The History of Human Origins3.00
A history of human origins from the fish who crawled out of the sea to early hominids to the peopling of the continents. Uses fossil, archaeological, experimental archaeological, linguistic, oral narrative and genetic evidence. Honors the origin narratives of diverse peoples. All religious views welcome. Many films. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST 104. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 111Modern World History3.00
Focuses on themes rather than chronology. Students follow the growing globalization of the world through the study of themes like nationalism, industrialization, imperialism, capitalism, decolonization, technologies, gender, race, everyday lives, world systems, migration and Diaspora. Will employ analysis of primary documents, photographs, maps, music, films or other sources of history and build skills of effective writing, clear presentations, use of convincing evidence, increasing geographic literacy and placing the history of specific regions in a global context. Aims to provide an introduction to the discipline of history and its methods. Emphasis on learning to think globally. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 112The Ancient Mediterranean World3.00
General-education-level course introducing students to the basic outlines of the history of the Mediterranean region -- including Greece, Rome, Spain, northern Africa, and Palestine -- from the earliest times to the Middle Ages. While investigating some key events and stories from these places and times, students learn to critically evaluate the ways these stories are re-told in our time, using actual texts and documents from the times in comparison to books and movies about those times from our day. Code 1
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
HIST 113Soccer and identity: A Global History3.00
This course focuses on the social, cultural and political impact of soccer across the world. It tackles issues of racial, ethnic, class and geographic identities as well as gender dynamics through an examination of the development of soccer, and its iconic rivalries. It traces the history and development of the game in various parts of the world – Asia, Africa, North America, South America and Europe. Students engage in critical analysis of a range of sources: academic and popular non-fiction books; scholarly journal articles; newspaper and magazine articles; fan literature (blogs, fanzines, FB groups etc); and audio-visual materials (films, documentaries and matches). Students learn how to use these verifiable historical evidence to construct reasoned interpretations of the human past. In discussion sessions and other classroom activities, students are encouraged to explore how interpretations of the past can be applied to address contemporary issues and problems.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 115World Religions3.00
A course on the history or world religions, some great and some small: Abrahamic, Dharmic, Indigenous faiths and religions of the Tao. The course stresses links between faiths and their historic origins. All faiths are equally respected. It is NOT a debate about which faith is true or better than another. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 119Kings, Concubines, Thinkers, Farmers in East Asia3.00
China, Japan and Korea make up one of the fastest growing regions today. We buy all sorts of stuff made in China; text on our Samsung phones; drive our Hondas, Toyotas, and Hyundais; listen to K-pop; watch Jackie Chan and cheered on Yao Ming; read manga comics and watch anime; consume dim sum and chow mein, ramen and sushi, kimchi and bibimbop. This course seeks to understand what makes these societies tick; societies that share many similarities but are continually asserting their unique linguistic, cultural and political identities. We reach back to the pre-modern period to examine the lives of the elite (emperors, princes, generals, poets, philosophers) and everyday folks (soldiers and samurais, farmers, traders, monks, concubines). The course will use a diverse range of sources, from scholarly articles and memoirs to documentaries, movies and music videos. The course centers on active-dynamic learning such as focused in-class discussion, presentations, critical thinking, as well as short- and medium-length essays. It introduces students to the study and discipline of history. Code 3
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 120Conquest and Resistance in Modern Asia3.00
This course examines the impact of one of the key dynamics of late modern history in Asia: colonialism. It takes a comparative look at how imperialism was experienced by the invading power and the colonized people in traditionally lesser-studied regions of the world. We look at a number of case studies of Western and Japanese colonialism from the 19th century onwards, including – (1) the Spanish and the US in the Philippines (2) the British experience in Asia (primarily India but also Burma); (3) the French in Vietnam; (4) The Dutch experience in Indonesia; and finally, (5) the Japanese in China, Taiwan, and Korea, and later during WWII, in Southeast Asia. (Other case studies may also be used.) We examine the social, economic, cultural, political, and personal impact of imperialism on both the metropole and the colony. We will read memoirs, watch music videos and films, and discuss issues such as the nuts and bolts of colonial rule, the role of women, attitudes towards race and identity, indigenous pursuit of modernity, and nationalism among others. Emphasis on learning to think globally and provides University Studies students and majors with an introduction to historical thinking. Code 3
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 125Modern Latin America3.00
An examination of issues of development and underdevelopment using Latin America as a case study. Students will explore a variety of theories of underdevelopment and use Latin American History to weigh the merits of these various theories. Code 2
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 131Modern Europe 1789 to Present3.00
An introductory course on Europe's tumultuous "modern" era, from the French Revolution to the present. Focus on a few key topics, like the Liberal revolutions, industrialization, the World Wars, Nazism and totalitarianism, or the efforts to create a European Union, will allow students both to delve deeply into particular episodes of European history and at the same time to develop skill in the basic methods and purposes of historical inquiry. Course activities will focus on close readings of historical documents, discussion, essay writing, and formal oral argument. Code 1
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 151History of the United States Through 18773.00
Examination of a series of questions and controversies in United States history from the European conquest to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Explores issues such as the nature of the U.S. Constitution, immigration and industrialization, slavery and emancipation. Provides general education students and majors with an introduction to historical thinking.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
HIST 152The United States Since 18773.00
Examination of a series of questions and controversies in United States history from the late 19th Century through the present. Explores such issues as labor and social class, race and civil rights, gender and women's rights, the U.S. as global superpower, the Great Depression and social reform. Provides general education students and majors with an introduction to historical thinking.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
HIST 181The Muslim World3.00
Survey-level course introduces students to a variety of topics about the Muslim world from multidisciplinary perspectives. The time and life of the prophet Muhammad, the rise of great Islamic empires, Islam and women, the spread of Islam in America and the explosion of Islamic resurgence and extremism are all topics for consideration. Code 4
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
HIST 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
HIST 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
POLS 101Introduction to Comparative Politics3.00
The recent history of Afghanistan has highlighted the complexities of national and state building. This course explores these two terms and what they mean. Is there a single universal definition and a singular path to modernity or are there multiple definitions and pathways to modernity? The first part of the course will examine the various theories of development with this question in mind. The second part of the course will focus on one developing country. By concentrating on their development pattern we draw out some lessons about tensions and contradictions that accompany development.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 175The Making of the Modern Global System3.00
Is another world possible? Could we have inherited a different global order? We examine the pillars of current global order, such as the rise of capitalism, emergence of state, violence, imperialism, rise and fall of dominant states, and emergence of democratic values and institutions. We particularly examine how we as individuals interact and help maintain the current global order with an understanding that we can change the current order for a better order in the future. The second part of the course examines various theories of how to understand the global order ranging from realism, liberalism, Marxism, to globalization, human security and feminism.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
HHP: Health & Human Performance
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
HHP 102Health and Wellness3.00
Basic knowledge and understanding of health and critical thinking that provides students with the opportunity to develop and implement a plan for reaching their optimal level of functioning physically, emotionally, socially, mentally, spiritually, environmentally and occupationally. Does not count toward a major or minor in Health and Human Performance. Note: Students with medical restrictions should contact the lab coordinator of HHP 102 before the first lab session. Physical Education majors and minors must earn a grade of C or better in HHP 102.
University Studies Requirements:
Health & Human Performance
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
HL: Humanities - Literature
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ENGL 211British Literature I3.00
Survey of masterpieces and transitional works to 1789.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGL 212British Literature II3.00
Survey of masterpieces and transitional works from 1789 to the present.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 218Nonfiction Literature and Literacy3.00
Critical analysis and response to the structure and content of historic and contemporary nonfiction works in a variety of genres, including humorous writings, essays, speeches, professional articles, and memoirs.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Every Third Term Beg. Fall 12
ENGL 221American Literature I3.00
Survey of principal American writers from the Colonial Period through the mid-19th Century.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGL 222American Literature II3.00
Survey of principal American writers from the mid-19th century to the present.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
ENGL 228Multi-Ethnic American Literature3.00
Survey of a variety of multi-ethnic American literatures, including Native American, African-American, Latinx, Chicanx, Asian American, and various European-American writings starting with the oral traditions up to the 21st Century. Typically Offered: Fall and Spring Terms online, Fall or Spring on campus
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
ENGL 229Literature by Women3.00
Survey of British and American women's literature from the Middle Ages to the Contemporary Period. Women's literature across cultures, genres, and time periods.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
ENGL 241World Literature I3.00
Survey of selected literary works in translation from the Ancient World through the mid-17th Century. Includes works from the Western and non-Western world.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENGL 242World Literature II3.00
Survey of selected literary works in translation from the late 17th Century through the Contemporary Period. Includes works from the Western and non-Western world.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Humanities - Literature
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FYS 102First-Year Seminar-Humanities Literature3.00
First-Year Seminar
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - Literature
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
 
MCS: Math/Computer Science
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
CSCI 101Introduction to Computer Science3.00
A first course in computer science providing a survey of current topics as well as core programming and related problems solving skills. Satisfies the mathematics requirement for General Education. MATH 095 is recommended for taking this course.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is the Mathematics Placement Test, or successful completion of MATH 095 (recommended).
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
MATH 112Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics3.00
A liberal arts mathematics course presenting mathematics as a tool used by a wide range of professionals in modern society. Real-life examples are used to promote understanding of mathematics and its relationship to other areas of study. Examples will be chosen from graph theory (Traveling Salesman Problem and Euler Circuits), voting theory (fairness criteria and Arrow's impossibility theorem), elementary probability and statistics, logic, geometry, mathematics of growth, mathematics of finance, and mathematical modeling.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Adequate math placement score or completion of MATH 095 with a C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 113Algebra with Applications3.00
Algebraic concepts, problem-solving techniques, and applications for students in business, natural and social sciences. Topics include rates; proportions; linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic functions and their graphs; matrices; complex numbers.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Adequate Math Placement Score or completion of MATH 095 with a C- or better
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 115Precalculus5.00
Covers the algebra and trigonometry required for Calculus and Analytic Geometry. Topics include review of intermediate algebra; composite and inverse functions; polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, identities, and equations; the binomial theorem; fundamentals of analytic geometry; and conic sections.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Adequate math placement score or completion of MATH 113 with a C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 130Elementary Statistics4.00
Introductory course for students of all disciplines. Includes descriptive statistics, probability, the binomial and normal distributions, confidence intervals, correlation and linear regression, Central Limit Theorem, and one-sample (population mean and population proportion) and two-sample (population means) hypothesis testing. Problems are taken from various fields of study dependent on statistical decision making.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Adequate math placement score or completion of MATH 095 with a C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 151Calculus for Business, Life, and Social Sciences3.00
A short course in calculus including concepts and problem-solving techniques for students in business, economics, biology and the social sciences. Topics include algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions; derivatives, and optimization problems; integrals; partial derivatives and Lagrange multipliers as time permits.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Adequate math placement score or completion of MATH 113 with a C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
MATH 240Calculus and Analytic Geometry I4.00
A first course in the fundamentals of calculus. Topics include: real numbers; functions; limits; continuity; derivatives, integrals; the use of computational tools in calculus; transcendental functions; and applications.
University Studies Requirements:
Math/Computer Science
Prerequisites:
Adequate math placement score or completion of MATH 115 with a C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
NES: Natural Sciences - Environment
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
BIOL 170Biological Inquiry for Teachers2.00
This course uses inquiry-based science methods to answer open-ended biological questions that have environmental connections. This course is required of Elementary Education majors and satisfies environmental science requirements for the Wisconsin Teaching Licensure and the UW-Superior University Studies program. Lecture one hour, laboratory two hours.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHEM 100Our Chemical Environment2.00
Introduces the concepts of chemistry into the interpretation of chemical effects on the environment. Prerequisite: None. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science (environmental component). Credits cannot be counted toward a Chemistry major or minor. Offered both on campus and online.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHEM 101Elements & The Environment3.00
Introduction to basic concepts of chemistry and their importance in gaining a better understanding and appreciation of our environment. Many topics of current environmental concern will be discussed. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science (environmental component). Credits cannot be counted toward a chemistry major or minor. Students cannot earn credit for both CHEM 100 and 101.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
ENSC 100Environmental Science2.00
Basic course in human ecology for students with limited training in science. Emphasizes environmental problems related to human activity in the modern world. Meets the General Education environmental science requirement and meets the Wisconsin Teaching Certification Requirement for Environmental Science. Does not count toward the Biology major. No prerequisite. (Lecture two hours.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
GEOL 120Our Water Resources4.00
The Water & Environment course is designed for all students and aim to train students broadly in water resources. The course will be emphasizing on surface water, groundwater, water use, water quality, dams, water allocation, water use conflict, and emerging water issues. Water resources will be linked to the environmental issues that facing our globe. Problem in global change related to the land surface and water through hydrological cycle, contamination, recharge-discharge, and water scarcity will be addressed. Students will work with various software (Aquachem, GIS, Excel) and learn through the lab and assignments problem solving skills.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
 
NS: Natural Sciences - Lab
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
BIOL 115Human Biology4.00
University Studies course investigating the structure and function of the human body as related to areas of health and disease. Designed to meet the University Studies requirement for laboratory science. Does not count toward the Biology major. Not open to those having taken BIOL 270, or 280. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours).
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
BIOL 123Concepts In Biology4.00
Introduction for non-Biology majors to important biological concepts including chemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, plant and animal form and function, and ecology. Laboratory exercises are integrated with lectures and designed to be experimental and inquiry driven. Fulfills the University Studies requirement for laboratory science. Does not count toward the Biology major. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BIOL 130Principles of Biology I4.00
Introduction to important principles of chemistry, cellular, molecular, and evolutionary biology, and the diversity of life. Laboratory experiments are inquiry driven. Intended as the first of a two-course sequence for biology majors, and students with a strong interest in the life sciences. Fulfills the University Studies laboratory science requirement. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHEM 102Chemistry of Everyday Phenomena4.00
Explores the chemistry of foods, drugs, household chemicals, personal hygiene products, agricultural chemicals, materials and other types of chemistry relevant to the student. Current chemistry topics in the popular press will be critically examined. Topics not usually addressed in other science general education courses will be presented. A small part of the course will be devoted to elementary statistics (evaluation, not calculation) to enable students to understand science and medicine as it is commonly reported. An important but minor part of the course involves discussion of the role of research in technology development and standard of living, and the impact of the chemical industry on the national and world economies. Credits cannot be counted toward a Chemistry major or minor. Prerequisite: None. (Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 105General Chemistry I5.00
Introduction to physical and chemical properties of the elements, chemical reactions, gas laws, chemical nomenclature, structure of atoms, chemical bonding, and solutions. Intermediate algebra (MATH 113) or equivalent strongly recommended as prerequisite. (Four lectures and one three-hour laboratory.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOL 110The Dynamic Earth4.00
An introductory science class that emphasizes the foundational principles and concepts of geology. Topics include: minerals, rocks, Earth's internal structure, plate tectonics, geologic structures, the rock cycle, climate change, glaciers, groundwater, geologic structures, the rock cycle, climate change, glaciers, groundwater, geologic resources and earthquakes. One weekend field trip. (lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours).
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOL 120Our Water Resources4.00
The Water & Environment course is designed for all students and aim to train students broadly in water resources. The course will be emphasizing on surface water, groundwater, water use, water quality, dams, water allocation, water use conflict, and emerging water issues. Water resources will be linked to the environmental issues that facing our globe. Problem in global change related to the land surface and water through hydrological cycle, contamination, recharge-discharge, and water scarcity will be addressed. Students will work with various software (Aquachem, GIS, Excel) and learn through the lab and assignments problem solving skills.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHYS 100Astronomy4.00
Includes a brief history of astronomy, the study of the motions and structures of the Earth, the moon, the sun, planets, stars and galaxies and consideration of cosmological theories. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science laboratory class. Offered on campus Fall Terms only, and on line Spring Terms.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHYS 107Algebra-Based Physics I4.00
Newtonian mechanics and waves. Designed for students majoring in the humanities, education, medical sciences, or biological sciences. Not open to students with a major in Chemistry or Mathematics. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science laboratory class.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Prerequisites:
MATH 102, 113 or 115 with grade of C-or better or math placement test is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHYS 160Physical Science4.00
Laboratory-oriented course covering the basic concepts of physics and chemistry. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Sciences laboratory class, recommended for elementary education majors. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) Offered Fall Term on-line and Spring Term on-campus
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHYS 201Calculus-Based Physics I5.00
Newtonian mechanics, waves and thermodynamics. Meets the University Studies Program requirement for Natural Science laboratory class. (Lecture four hours, laboratory two hours.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 240.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
 
SS: Social Science
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ANTH 101The Human Experience3.00
Introduction to the principles, concepts and methods of cultural anthropology. Consideration of the ways in which cultural anthropology contributes to the understanding of human diversity.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ANTH 340Language, Culture, and Society3.00
The study of language and language use as essential elements of human culture, connected to thought, experience, identity, power, and social relations.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
CJUS 106Crime, Behavior and Social Control3.00
Multidisciplinary analysis of individual, community and government responses to harmful conduct; an examination of criminal, juvenile, military, and civil justice as well as informal and personal control systems; an inquiry into the use of coercion to promote conformity or lessen injurious behavior; special attention given to decisions, processes and institutions which respond to acts of criminality and delinquency.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 235Economics in Society3.00
General introductory course highlighting economic and social issues facing society markets and prices, international trade, consumers and firms’ behavior, provision of government services, primarily oriented toward students outside business and economics, including social work, sociology, history, political science, education and the natural sciences.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 250Principles Of Microeconomics3.00
The role of households, firms, and industries in the use of resources. Survey of consumption, production, markets, price determination, and industrial organization including competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly. Policy issues and undergraduate research.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Prerequisites:
BUS 101 (Applies to SBE students only)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ECON 251Principles Of Macroeconomics3.00
Survey of national income accounts, employment theory, economic growth, fiscal and monetary policy, money and banking, inflation and international trade. Policy issues and undergraduate research.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Prerequisites:
BUS 101 (Applies to SBE students only)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
FIN 210Personal Finance3.00
Examines the basic principles and concepts of personal financial planning, purpose and operation of financial markets and institutions, economic impact of financial literacy, and behavioral aspects of personal finance. Decisions relating to money management, credit and borrowing, real estate ownership, savings, and investment are studied from the standpoint of the individual consumer. Recommended for non-business majors.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FNS 151Introduction to Tribal Administration3.00
Introduction to the basics of First Nations law and tribal governments, and how federal Indian policy has affected development of tribal governments that exist today. Cross-listed as POLS 151.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FYS 124First-Year Seminar-Social Sciences, Diversity3.00
First-Year Seminar
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
GEOG 100World Regional Geography3.00
Develops basic factual knowledge and awareness of the physical and cultural features of the world environment. Explores regional and world scale patterns of resources, climate, applied technology and trade, political alignments, and other aspects of the current world. All world political units are analyzed from a regional perspective. Students gain significant knowledge of world spatial relationships. Offered: Every Fall and Spring Terms on campus; Every Spring Term On Line.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOG 102Cultural Geography3.00
Explores the influence of culture on perceptions, decisions, and interpersonal relations on both planetary and local scales of life. A broad range of cultural topics are considered, including the origins of culture, human development, political and social organization, religions and languages, and evolving human landscapes. Prepares students to be well-informed citizens of our increasingly interconnected global community. Offered On Campus Spring Terms and On Line Fall Terms.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GST 150Introduction to Gender Studies3.00
Introduction to Gender Studies explores various answers to the question: How does gender influence the way in which we interact with and are impacted by society? To that end, this course introduces students to feminist perspectives and challenges students to incorporate self-exploration with academic skill to analyze one's personal experience, and the experience of others, within social institutions such as family, government, employment, religion, and education through the lens of gender. We will examine how issues of gender within our society intersect with race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, differing abilities, and age to perpetuate a system of oppression.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GST 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/GST 210.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
IDS 104First-Year Seminar-Social Sciences3.00
First Year Seminar
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Prerequisites:
First Year Seminar courses are open to new freshmen only.
IDS 131Transitions: From Military to Campus Culture3.00
Beginning-level seminar that fulfills a University Studies requirement for the social sciences. This course is limited in enrollment to students in the military, including veterans. This course enables students to examine human behavior or interaction using the methods and assumptions of social science research. This course was specifically developed for transitioning soldiers and veterans to support their academic and life goals. Topics covered include transitioning from military to civilian and campus life; connecting with resources to support success; and understanding the role of events and experiences on personal and professional goals. We will study developmental theories, including the adult learning theory; the mind-body relationship; and cognitive theories to better understand how we connect with our environment and engage in community and learning.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
LSTU 115Law and Human Behavior3.00
Provides a general framework of knowledge, ideas and thought -- mainstream and critical -- regarding the assumptions, structures, actors, operation, intentions and outcomes of the American legal system. Interdisciplinary liberal arts course exploring the effect of law on and in our society from past, present and future perspectives. Law now pervades most of what we think, do and believe in the United States. This course will help illuminate how and why that happens.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
LSTU 261Contemporary Issues in Law and Society3.00
Explores controversies arising within or impinging on the American legal system. Research, discussion and debate on 20 pressing issues of contemporary significance in American law. Students consider the differential impact of issues on various disempowered and minority groups in the United States and around the world. Fulfills General Education Social Science-Contemporary Society category.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
POLS 100Introduction to Political Science3.00
Politics is often perceived as cynical and subsidiary from the normative interaction of society. But what is politics? What is the role of politics in society? What is the relationship between politics and government? To what extent does politics influence human relations and the ways in which government and its institutions function? The course will examine these questions by focusing on one topic each semester. Each of these topics--such as the concept of borders, citizenship, globalization, immigration, etc.--represents a central debate in politics, and introduces some of the current concerns in our world today.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
POLS 102Civic Literacy, Engagement and Education3.00
: Examines how civic values, dispositions, and practices affect the quality of a democracy, with attention to democratic participation beyond the ballot box, media literacy, patterns of civic engagement, policy making institutions at the national, state and local levels, creating democratic institutions and procedures, democracy simulations, and decision-making.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
POLS 150Sex, Scandal, and Corruption in U.S. Politics3.00
This course examines what constitutes a political scandal, why a certain scandal can become ‘viral,’ and investigate the progression of major scandals throughout American history. Also included is a discussion of the implications for trust and legitimacy, the immediate and long-term consequences of scandal, and the different responses to corruption used by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Through this lens, students will gain an understanding of the workings of American National Government.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
POLS 180Public Education Politics and Policy3.00
A study of the importance of public education as a public good and a right; policy making institutions at both the national and state level; and analysis of the output—public education outcomes with an emphasis on how schools are funded in the US and its implications for present and future.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
POLS 230U.S. National, State and Local Government3.00
Structure of American government on the national, state and local levels; federalism; behavior patterns of public officials; modes of citizen participation. Meets DPI requirements. Not open to Political Science majors.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
POLS 240Bioterrorism: A Case in Public Policy Making3.00
What role does government play in preparing for a potential biowarfare/bioterrorist act? Preventing such attacks or outbreaks? This course reviews the powers of the state to prevent and respond to attacks, including a background in the history, origins, motivations, and techniques used by terrorists. The course will cover the potential for biowarfare/bioterrorist acts, how destruction is produced, and government preparedness, response, and recovery from such attacks. Bioterrorism and its various dimensions is the primary focus and thus topics covered in this class. For most weeks, however, we will ask (and attempt to answer) the question ‘what role does/should government have in addressing this issue?’
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
POLS 260Contemporary Issues in American Politics3.00
Same-sex marriage, welfare reform, stem cell research, urban poverty, the legalization of medical marijuana...these and other contemporary issues incite tremendous passion among the public, leading to policy debates, disputes over the role of government in American society and controversial social policy. This course goes beyond the surface-level debates and explores the political and social context of contemporary political controversies as well as the ramifications of government policies.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PSYC 101Introduction To Psychology3.00
Introduction to the scientific study of psychology covering major areas of study within the discipline, including biological bases of behavior, learning and conditioning, memory and cognition, motivation and emotion, social and cultural influences on behavior and attitudes, personality, health psychology, and mental illness. Select sections include an Academic Service-Learning project (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). Required for the Psychology major and minor.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PSYC 230Social Cognition3.00
How do we think about the social world around us? How do we form impressions and explain our own and others' behavior? This course will explore the automatic and controlled cognitive processes that shape our feelings, motivations, decisions, and biases. Additionally, we will examine how fundamental cognitive patterns form the basis for creating and maintaining prejudice. Meets the Learning, Cognition, and Language requirement for the Psychology major.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
SOCI 101Introduction to Sociology3.00
General introduction to the study of human relationships, group aspects of behavior and social institutions. Considers basic concepts and theories.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SOCI 201Global Social Problems3.00
Why do such profound socioeconomic differences exist among nations, particularly so-called developed and developing countries? Why do these differences seem to be permanent? What keeps developing countries from developing? What is the relationship between development and environmental crisis? In this class, we will explore these questions and more by studying the social relationships behind the production of everyday things.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SOCI 210Sociology of Gender3.00
Introduces the social construction of sex and gender. It focuses on both local and international materials, with particular attention to gender inequality in contemporary societies. Intersections with class, race, nation and other social categories are also explored. Cross listed with SOCI/GST 210.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SOCI 273Race and Ethnicity3.00
Examines the social production of racial and ethnic categories as well as the practices that enact these categories. After examining the representation of these categories as "natural," the course uses local and global evidence to investigate the institutional and representational processes that historically create and modify race and ethnicity.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
T ED 289Teacher Education Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Prerequisites:
Student must be On Campus (not DLC)
T ED 489Teacher Education Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Social Science
Prerequisites:
Student must be On Campus (not DLC)
 
WLCP: Humanities - WLCP
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FNS 101Beginning Ojibwa Language4.00
For beginning students in Ojibwa language. Introduction to the phonetics, pronunciation, and rhythm of the Ojibwa language. A standardized spelling system and basic vocabulary will be used; focus on oral fluency.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 110Survey of First Nations Culture3.00
Examination of traditional and contemporary First Nations culture. Includes the legends, religion, poetry, music, design, dance, oratory, and history of tribal groups in North America.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FNS 289First Nations Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
FNS 489First Nations Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
FREN 101Beginning French I3.00
Study of language fundamentals with emphasis on development of listening and speaking skills. Practice in reading and writing. Only for students with no previous French study.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
HIST 154African-American Voices3.00
Explores the African-American experience over the past two centuries with an emphasis on social and political discourse. The ideas of major political, literary, cultural and intellectual figures, as well as the content of black folk and popular culture, will be examined in a social and historical context. Authors include Douglass, DuBois, Hurston, Garvey, King, Malcolm X, and bell hooks. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MUSI 161Music and World Culture3.00
Survey of non-Western musical cultures, including ethnic origins of folk and traditional music in America. Required listening. Open to all students.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHIL 151Introduction To Philosophy3.00
Philosophy concerns some of the most fundamental questions: Why do human beings exist? Does everything have a cause? Can you think without language? What does it mean to live a good life? What is the nature of freedom? Are humans truly free? We will consider these questions and more through exploring perspectives from around the globe, from the ancient to the contemporary.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 160Philosophy and Film3.00
In this course we will view films with philosophical themes and pair them with readings that help us to consider those themes more deeply. Readings will be at the introductory level; and films will include everything from the artsy to the absurd.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHIL 211Contemporary Moral Problems3.00
Are all acts inherently selfish? Should everyone follow the same moral laws? Do we need God to tell us how to behave? Why should we be good and what does that even mean? Should all living creatures be treated equally? In this course we will entertain questions like these as we apply moral theories to a selection of contemporary issues (for example, human rights, environmental ethics, the global sex trade, the death penalty). A key concern will be our ethical responsibilities in the diverse contemporary global theater. Offered on-line only.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
PHIL 212Critical Thinking3.00
The central objective of this course is to help students understand a diverse array of critical thinking styles. This course emphasizes that the type of thinking one applies depends heavily on one’s objective, cultural context, and personal style. These goals will be addressed through a series of modules, each one demonstrating different methods of engaging with ideas to determine their value, falsity, and/or truth. Students will be exposed to methods of reasoning in a variety of historical and cultural contexts. Students will be required: to reflect on their own decision-making process; to identify, evaluate and apply diverse perspectives; to connect and contrast different worldviews; and understand the historical sources of, and to demonstrate openness to, dissimilar worldviews.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHIL 262Introduction to Political Thought3.00
This course exposes students to some of the classic pieces in this field of political theory and teaches them how to work with theoretical and philosophical texts that continue to shape, inform, and challenge the analysis of current political phenomena today. Through these texts, the course introduces questions about the nature of human beings, the roots of government authority, the best regime, and the circumstances of legitimate revolution as well as ideals such as liberty, equality, rights, and justice. Cross-listed as PHIL/POLS 262.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
POLS 265Contemporary Political Thought3.00
Introduces students to the origin and theoretical background of some of the central debates within political theory. Focus is on topics such as power and authority, nation-state in a global world, sovereignty and control, gender and identity and human rights. By analyzing and understanding some of the common underlying assumptions and beliefs about human nature, society, and state, we will learn about the forces that shape our economic, social and political systems today.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SPAN 101Beginning Spanish I3.00
Study of language fundamentals with emphasis on listening, speaking, and reading skills. Practice in writing. Only for students with no previous Spanish study, or consent of instructor.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SPAN 102Beginning Spanish II3.00
Continuation of SPAN 101.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SPAN 101, or appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SPAN 201Intermediate Spanish I3.00
Review of grammar. Emphasis on oral skills, writing, and reading of Spanish.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SPAN 102, appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SPAN 202Intermediate Spanish II3.00
Continuation of SPAN 201.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SPAN 201, appropriate placement test score, or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
WLLC 207An Exploration of the World of Spanish Speaking Cultures0.00 - 3.00
In this study abroad course the history, culture and folklore of the Spanish speaking world will be explored through a myriad of literary texts, music, and film (either in Spanish or translation). Students will also have the opportunity to interact directly in Spanish with other native speakers through a variety of activities woven into the course. During this course the students will have the opportunity to visit historic sites and museums to allow them to experience the culture firsthand. Reading, writing and oral work will be done in English and/or Spanish. Course may be repeated for credit with different study abroad experience. Prerequisite: pre-session meetings.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
WRIT: College Writing
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
WRIT 102Introduction to Academic Writing3.00
Critical reading, research, and academic writing arguments. Emphasis on information literacy, elements of persuasion, documentation and citation. Students must pass with a C- or better.
University Studies Requirements:
College Writing
Prerequisites:
A qualifying score on ACT English or SAT Verbal or WEPT or AP Language and Comp test or AP Literature and Comp test; or permission of Writing Coordinator for students taking ESL 132.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
WRIT2: Professional Writing
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
WRIT 209Introduction to Professional Writing3.00
Writing in a range of genres related to the rhetorical situations, audiences, technologies, and multicultural environments of the 21st century workplace. Emphasis on liberal arts career skills. Students must pass with a C- or better to complete the core writing sequence.
University Studies Requirements:
Professional Writing
Prerequisites:
Completion of WRIT 102 with a grade of C- or better and completion of 30 college credits or instructor permission.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms