Human Behavior, Justice and Diversity

Mission Statement Top of Page

The Human Behavior, Justice and Diversity Department is a multi-disciplinary department housing Social Work, Psychology, Legal Studies / Criminal Justice and First Nations Studies.

Faculty and Staff Top of Page

Bolton Holz, Kenna - Associate Professor, Psychology
Cuzzo, Maria Stalzer Wyant - Professor, PhD, JD, Mediator, Legal Studies / Criminal Justice
Goerdt, Lynn Amerman - Associate Professor, Social Work
Hettinger, Vanessa - Assistant Professor, Psychology
Johnson, Margaret - Univ Svcs Assoc 2, HBJD
LaCoursiere, Nate - Senior Lecturer, Legal Studies / Criminal Justice
Lewandowski, Diane - University Svcs Program Assoc
Lilly, Mandy - Assistant Professor, Social Work
Mahoney, Joseph - Assistant Professor, Psychology 
Pinnow, Eleni - Associate Professor, Psychology
Rappley-Larson, Mimi - Associate Professor, Social Work
Steblay, Steven - Senior Lecturer, Criminal Justice / Legal Studies
Stocker, Shevaun - Professor, Psychology
Willingham, Alli - Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice / Legal Studies

Majors Top of Page

Minors Top of Page

Certificates Top of Page

Course Descriptions Top of Page

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CJUS - Criminal Justice
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
CJUS 106Crime, Behavior and Social Control3.00
Multidisciplinary analysis of individual, community and government responses to harmful conduct; an examination of criminal, juvenile, military, and civil justice as well as informal and personal control systems; an inquiry into the use of coercion to promote conformity or lessen injurious behavior; special attention given to decisions, processes and institutions which respond to acts of criminality and delinquency.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CJUS 160Field Exp./Cert Prog CJUS1.00 - 3.00
An academically grounded, structured professional experience in a justice setting. Students seeking credit should consult with the director of the Criminal Justice program for application guidelines. Written approval of the instructor must be obtained before registering. Since the field experience is an introductory, independent learning experience involving the cooperation and assistance of outside agencies, a student should notify the instructor in writing of an interest in enrolling in the course several months before the semester of the actual field experience. Instructor consent required. Formal arrangements with an agency may be easier to complete with careful, early planning.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CJUS 189Criminal Justice Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CJUS 207Police and Society3.00
Broad survey of the role of the police in American society. Special attention given to the origins of policing, the nature of police organizations and police work, and problems and issues in the relationship between police agencies and the community.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CJUS 212Criminal Investigations3.00
Problems of directing and controlling criminal investigation; survey of the fundamentals of investigation, crime scene search and recording, collection and preservation of evidence, scientific investigation, crime analysis, information sources, interview and interrogation, and case monitoring and preparation.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CJUS 289Criminal Justice Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CJUS 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for this credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation, otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements, consult your advisor. May be repeated only if content is different.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CJUS 312Gender,Crime,and Justice3.00
Exploration of the social construction of gender in crime and delinquency as well as in justice systems; analysis of how assumptions about female and male natures, as well as appropriate roles and positions in society affect the interpretation and application of law; comparison of women/girls and men/boys as offenders, victims and practitioners. Cross-listed as CJUS/GST 312.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CJUS 316Crime, Corrections and Punishment3.00
Survey of philosophical, historical, sociological, psychological and political aspects of the American prison and related programs in the criminal justice system; problems of inmate culture, control, supervision and treatment are emphasized through analysis of penal institutions and treatment/release programs. Attention is given to examining incarceration through the "eyes" of inmates. The course may be taught from an academic service learning perspective, involving field experiences in custodial settings.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CJUS 318Community Corrections3.00
Analysis of theories and practice of probation and parole, responses of paroling authorities to public pressures and court controls and their implications for rehabilitative efforts; analysis of feasibility and effectiveness of treatment of individuals under sentence in the community.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CJUS 320Special Topics3.00
Selected topics in the administration of justice. May be repeated when the content of the special topic is substantially different from previous course presentations. See course instructor to review content. Previous topics: Military Justice; Terrorism: Meaning and Justice; Masculinities and Crime; Restorative Justice. As needed.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CJUS 374Research Methods in Criminal Justice3.00
Introduction to the research methods applied in criminology and criminal justice. Includes an examination of the scientific method, quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods approaches.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CJUS 389Criminal Justice Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CJUS 448Criminology3.00
Multidisciplinary analysis of criminal behavior. Special attention devoted to the definition, nature and scope of crime in the United States and the explanations which evolved to account for this form of deviant behavior. Includes historical analysis of criminological thought and strategies of social control.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CJUS 463Delinquency and Juvenile Justice3.00
Examination of the social and psychological dimensions of juvenile delinquency: its nature, extent, distribution and patterns; evaluation of theories and explanations of delinquent causation; consideration of the legal processing of delinquents; programs of prevention and treatment of delinquents. Satisfies the requirement of general education as an independent learning and a capstone experience. Students completing CJUS 463 as a senior capstone experience will be required to give a public presentation on their work. See director of the Criminal Justice Program and/or coordinator in Legal Studies program for more information.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CJUS 489Criminal Justice Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CJUS 491Applied Criminal Justice3.00
Academic and professional development in justice settings as well as course meetings. A field experience in criminal justice that applies scholarly research to understanding justice agencies and organizations. Students discern policies and practices of justice organizations through systematic observations at agency sites as well as frequent, regularly scheduled course meetings with the course instructor. The workings of agencies and agents will be measured through analytical and reflective writing exercises. Written consent of the instructor must be obtained before registering. Since a significant part of the course is an independent learning experience involving the cooperation and assistance of outside agencies, a student should notify the instructor in writing of an interest in enrolling in the course early in the semester before the semester of the actual field experience. Instructor consent required. Formal arrangements with an agency may be easier to complete with careful, early planning. Students completing CJUS 491 as a senior capstone experience will be required to give a public presentation on their work. See director of the Criminal Justice Program and/or Coordinator in Legal Studies program for more information.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
CJUS 492Criminal Justice Policy Issues and Reform3.00
Group designed research based on approved proposal of a significant and focused public policy topic. Generating a coherent researchable idea, reviewing a literature, collecting and analyzing information/data and reporting results. Satisfies the requirement of general education as an independent learning and a capstone experience. Students completing CJUS 492 as a senior capstone experience will be required to give a public presentation on their work. See director of the Criminal Justice Program and/or coordinator in Legal Studies program for more information.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of both CJUS 374 and either MATH 130 or PSYC 301.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CJUS 497Student Initiated Seminar1.00 - 3.00
The program offers a specially designed seminar or student-initiated seminar when there is sufficient interest. For further information, see the Criminal Justice Program director.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CJUS 498Senior Capstone Presentation0.00
Required culminating senior-year public presentation, based on CJUS 463 (Delinquency and Juvenile Justice), CJUS 491 (Applied Criminal Justice), CJUS 492 (Senior Thesis), or CJUS 499 (Individualized Research). See UW-Superior catalog for Criminal Justice capstone course descriptions. The presentation will be given at a specified time in the relevant fall or spring semester prior to graduation. It may be made in one of several ways, including an oral presentation, a poster, digital video, and theatrical or other performance. Pass-Fail. Arranged. Advisor permission required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CJUS 499Individualized Research1.00 - 3.00
Either supervised research in selected subfields of the discipline resulting in the submission of a formal research paper, or development and execution of a project designed to apply criminal justice or social science concepts and skills to a particular situation, drawing upon the relevant scholarly literature and resulting in submission of a formal research and experience-evaluation paper. Projects devoted to the demonstration of skills may include, but need not be limited to: direct participation in a criminal justice agency; other activity on behalf of a criminal justice interest group; involvement in a University justice agency; service as an intern with a government agency or a private organization with a justice interest; or an active leadership role in a private or community organization. May be repeated once for a total of six credits. Instructor consent required. Consultation with the instructor must take place within the first two weeks of the semester. As needed.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
FNS - First Nation Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
FNS 101Beginning Ojibwa Language4.00
For beginning students in Ojibwa language. Introduction to the phonetics, pronunciation, and rhythm of the Ojibwa language. A standardized spelling system and basic vocabulary will be used; focus on oral fluency.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 110Survey of First Nations Culture3.00
Examination of traditional and contemporary First Nations culture. Includes the legends, religion, poetry, music, design, dance, oratory, and history of tribal groups in North America.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - WLCP
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FNS 151Introduction to Tribal Administration3.00
Introduction to the basics of First Nations law and tribal governments, and how federal Indian policy has affected development of tribal governments that exist today. Cross-listed as POLS 151.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
FNS 189Indian Studies Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FNS 201Intermediate Ojibwa Language4.00
Speaking and comprehension of basic Ojibwa speech patterns. Development of rudimentary reading knowledge, conversational skills, and elementary grammar. Emphasis on vocabulary development and cultural perspectives. No prerequisite.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 223First Nations History I3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from their origin to the Dawes Act of 1887. Cross-listed as HIST/FNS 223.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 224First Nations History II3.00
Examination of the history and culture of the First Nations people from 1887 to the present. Special attention given to the federal government's role in administering Indian policy. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 224.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Humanities - History
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 230First Nations Myths and Legends3.00
Introduction to the oral tradition of First Nations people. Explores traditional stories and legends told by native peoples for generations. Students will understand the meaning they provided past generations of people and how their message is carried into the modern world.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 242First Nations Values and Spiritual Beliefs3.00
Examines a broad range of First Nations religious beliefs as they relate to the various cultural values of First Nations in North America. Emphasis on the spiritual significance of First Nations ceremonies and their relationship to the environment. Traditional teachings of First Nations will be examined as they relate to the lifestyles of First Nations people historically and today.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 289First Nations Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
FNS 304First Nations Literature3.00
Examines literature by and about First Nations people. Students read novels, short stories, and poetry by First Nations authors. Students will be made aware of how this literature differs from traditional western literature in content and theme. Also covers traditional stories that contemporary First Nations literature is based on.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 307Ojibwa Culture3.00
Examines various aspects of the Ojibwa culture in depth. A hands-on approach, with students going into the field and participating in lab activities such as wild ricing, sugar bush, drum and dance, and others. Can be repeated up to six credits.
FNS 324First Nations Wisconsin History3.00
History of the native peoples of Wisconsin from prehistoric times to the present. Major emphasis on the six federally recognized tribes in Wisconsin. Cross-listed as FNS/HIST 324.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 333The History of Indigenous Peoples3.00
A course on a global history of Indigenous Peoples which will explore the history of conquered and marginalized societies in a world systems context. The course examines their loss of economic resources, environmental security, cultural, linguistic and political sovereignty and their strategies for survival and reemergence as re-empowered peoples. Examples from many regions of the world with many films. Examples may change but the learning goals remain the same. Cross-listed as ANTH/FNS/HIST 333. Code 4. RE.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
FNS 368Cultures of Mesoamerica3.00
Investigates current and past cultures of Mesoamerica (located in present-day Mexico, Guatemala, and neighboring areas), both past and present, and their transformations and influence across time and borders. Employs archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data in a lecture, readings, film and discussion format. Cross-listed as ANTH/HIST/FNS 368. ANTH 101 highly recommended. Code 2.
University Studies Requirements:
Global Awareness
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 386Working with American Indian Families3.00
Focuses on issues related to contemporary American Indian family life, including recognition of the importance of American Indian tribal contexts and community-based assets; development and implementation of the Indian Child Welfare Act; impact of sovereignty and other social policy issues on American Indian families; and effective social work approaches to use when helping American Indian families. Offers an opportunity to better understand and work more effectively with American Indian families. Open to non-majors and can be used as a General Education diversity requirement. Cross-listed FNS/SOW 386.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
FNS 389First Nations Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
FNS 410First Nations Law3.00
Examines the unique relationship between indigenous tribes of the United States and the United States government through the context of tribal sovereignty. Explores the impact of the Supreme Court and the court's interpretation of legislation and judicial decisions of the past. Also explores the future of the domestic dependent nations status and tribal sovereignty.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of FNS 151 or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 430Contemporary Issues in First Nations Society3.00
Study of the problems faced by First Nations tribes in different parts of the country along with their relationships to local and national governments. Insight into the life and culture of First Nations in the contemporary world, and the political and tribal issues, which impact on the role of First Nations in today's society.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
FNS 460The Study of First Nations Women3.00
Exploration of the First Nations woman's social roles and lifestyles from a variety of tribal cultures in North America. Focuses on traditional and contemporary values and roles of First Nations women. Cross-listed as FNS/GST 460.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
FNS 480First Nations Society and Culture: Field Research4.00
Teaches basic social science research techniques and how they apply to the First Nations community. Group or individual field research projects will be completed during the semester.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 481Counseling the First Nations3.00
Explores counseling theory and application techniques from a First Nations perspective. First Nations world view and linear vs. holistic thinking are principle topics. Group and individual counseling is addressed and practiced. Designed for people in helping professions that deal with First Nations clients. Cross-listed as COUN 481/681.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
FNS 486Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in First Nations Studies selected by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when instructor and/or topics are different. Instructor's approval required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
FNS 489First Nations Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
University Studies Requirements:
Humanities - WLCP
FNS 490Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Supervised independent study and/or research in First Nations Studies. Instructor's approval required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
LSTU - Legal Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
LSTU 115Law and Human Behavior3.00
Provides a general framework of knowledge, ideas and thought -- mainstream and critical -- regarding the assumptions, structures, actors, operation, intentions and outcomes of the American legal system. Interdisciplinary liberal arts course exploring the effect of law on and in our society from past, present and future perspectives. Law now pervades most of what we think, do and believe in the United States. This course will help illuminate how and why that happens.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
LSTU 117Paralegalism and Ethics3.00
Explores the field of paralegalism, introduction to the law, legal procedures and paralegal skills and legal ethics.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 189Legal Studies Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
LSTU 210Criminal Procedure3.00
Study of the criminal justice process. Issues of search, seizure and arrest, pretrial and motions practice, jury trial and evidentiary rules; historical basis and evolution of the various aspects of the criminal justice process.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 211Criminal Law3.00
The legal definition of crime and defenses; purposes and function of the substantive criminal law; historical foundations; the limits of criminal law.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LSTU 220Civil Procedure3.00
Survey of the civil litigation process in state and federal courts, including form and content of documents used in instituting, prosecuting and defending lawsuits.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 221Administrative Law2.00
Review of federal, state and local administrative agencies.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
LSTU 223Family Law2.00
The law of family relation, including marriage, annulment, dissolution, judicial separation, alimony, legitimacy of children, custody and adoption, community property and non-marital relationships.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
LSTU 224Personal Injury Litigation2.00
Study of torts, including negligence, defenses, strict liability, nuisance, defamation and product liability.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
LSTU 228Contract Law2.00
Consideration of the principles of the law of contracts and restitution; contract formation; enforceability; performance and breach; plaintiffs' remedies and third-party interests.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
LSTU 233Law, Citizenship and Civic Engagement3.00
Investigates the legal rights and responsibilities of citizens in the United States, both individual and corporate. Topics include the ethical dimensions of citizenship, its acquisition and loss. The course involves the student in academic service learning in the local community.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LSTU 261Contemporary Issues in Law and Society3.00
Explores controversies arising within or impinging on the American legal system. Research, discussion and debate on 20 pressing issues of contemporary significance in American law. Students consider the differential impact of issues on various disempowered and minority groups in the United States and around the world. Fulfills General Education Social Science-Contemporary Society category.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 268Alternative Dispute Resolution3.00
Compares and contrasts the adversary system of American law, the settlement/negotiation model advanced within the Alternative Dispute Resolution movement. Discussion of comparative institutions, processes, costs, theoretical approaches and justifications. Treatment of theories and practice and skill/training development of alternatives to litigation including mediation, arbitration, mini-trials, etc.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LSTU 289Legal Studies Elective0.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
LSTU 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by department faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a detailed written evaluation of learning situations associated with the course. With consent of the relevant program and content adaptation, programs provided by other agencies can be considered for credit. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. Otherwise the course may not count. For specific degree requirements, consult your advisor. Course can be repeated only if content is different.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
LSTU 303Environmental Law and Regulation3.00
Explores the ethics of and relationships between environmental issues and governmental action, as well as conservation, preservation and management of natural resources through public policy relation to government and the role of morality and legislation in matters of individual choice.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
LSTU 305Methods of Legal Research and Writing3.00
Introduction to legal research, including legal resources and computerized legal data research; practice briefing cases and use of treatises, texts, digests, reporter systems, citation resources, encyclopedias, legal periodicals and government documents; introduction to basic principles of legal analysis and writing principles.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LSTU 306Methods of Legal Writing and Argumentation3.00
Advanced course in legal research, writing and argumentation skills.
Prerequisites:
Having completed LSTU 305 is prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 321Judicial Process3.00
This course asks two easily stated and related questions: (1) how do judges judge? (2) how should judges judge? Study of adjudication in both civil and criminal contexts.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 333Great Legal Trials: Stories That Changed Law3.00
Explores the great legal trials that informed and transformed our understanding of the law and the society that we live within. Students will also deepen their understanding of theories and practices of argument construction and defense. Offers numerous hands-on practice experiences.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
LSTU 354Jurisprudence3.00
Consideration of law, its means and ends; focus on special problems in contemporary legal philosophy such as conflicting theories of punishment, the natural law/positivist debate, individual rights in relation to government and the role of morality and legislation in matters of individual choice.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
LSTU 363Comparative Law and Courts3.00
Examines several judicial systems including the common law and civil law systems, Islamic justice, socialist law and Asian and African systems. Terrorism and the courts.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
LSTU 365Race, Class, Gender and the Law3.00
Explores how the law has interacted with, impacted and affected race, ethnicity, gender and class issues in the United States context. Students read and criticize key legal cases, explore arguments made in legal settings about race/ethnicity/class/gender, examine the areas of silence or inaction by the law and assess the current interconnection between race, ethnicity, class, gender and the law. Fulfills diversity requirement of General Education.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Every Other Year
LSTU 389Legal Studies Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
LSTU 450U.S.Constitutional Law, Part I3.00
Survey of the origin and development of the U.S. Constitution using Supreme Court cases which define the powers of the Supreme Court, Congress and the President; the relationship between the national government and the individual states.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
LSTU 451U.S. Constitutional Law, Part II-Civil Liberties and Civil Rights3.00
Study of the constitutional principles concerning the relations between the individual and the government; using decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court; consideration of the requirements of due process and criminal procedure necessary to safeguard the constitutional rights of criminal suspects and defendants.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
LSTU 485Internship3.00
A structured and focused field experience in a law-related placement. Students perform duties assigned by their placement supervisor, keep a log/journal of activities and prepare a 12-15 page analysis paper discussing specific ways their placement complemented, and added perspective to coursework. Students completing LSTU 485 as a senior capstone experience will be required to give a public presentation on their work. Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
LSTU 489Legal Studies Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
LSTU 497Special and Student-Initiated Seminars1.00 - 3.00
This is a specially designed seminar or student-initiated seminar when there is sufficient interest or a special topic to examine. For further information, contact LSTU program faculty.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
LSTU 498Senior Capstone Presentation0.00
Required culminating senior-year public presentation, based on LSTU 485 (Internship), LSTU 499-1 (Mock Trial or Mock Mediation) or LSTU 499-2 (Independent Research/Applied Skills). See UW-Superior catalogue for Legal Studies capstone curse descriptions. The presentation must be given at an arranged time in the semester of the student's expected graduation. It may be made in one of several media, including a poster, theatrical or other performance, digital video, film, etc. This course is taken on a pass-fail basis. Failure to complete LSTU 498 may block graduation. Arranged. Advisor permission required.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
LSTU 499Independent Research/Applied Skills1.00 - 3.00
Section 1: Mock Trial. Applied skills course experience for those participating in competitive Mock Trial. Spring semester each year. Section 2: General Research. For students pursuing independent and advanced research projects under the supervision of a faculty member on a topic and consistent with a plan mutually agreed to between instructor and student. Also can be used for applied skills experiences that are equivalent to academic credit experiences within judgment of instructor of Legal Studies courses. On demand. Course can be repeated for up to six credits toward graduation although only three credits count toward major/minor requirements. Students completing LSTU 499 as a senior capstone experience will be required to give a public presentation of their work. See Legal Studies faculty for more information.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
MEDI - Mediation
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
MEDI 241Ethics and State Regulation of Mediation1.00
Explores the ethical codes of conduct for mediation, the state regulatory schemes for conflict regulation and the professional expectations for mediators as well as domestic violence and mediation training.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
MEDI 471Family Law Mediation3.00
Theory and practices of conflict resolution and mediation in the area of family law (including but not limited to custody, parenting, visitation, divorce settlement issues). In conjunction with MEDI 241, this course meets the 40-hour State of Minnesota Rule 114 requirements for the family facilitative roster and the State of Wisconsin Chapter 767 requirements.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
MEDI 472Civil Law Mediation2.00
Theory and practice of mediation and conflict resolution in the civil law. In conjunction with MEDI 241, this course meets the 30-hour requirement for the State of Minnesota Rule 114 in civil facilitative roster.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
 
PSYC - Psychology
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
PSYC 101Introduction To Psychology3.00
Introduction to the scientific study of psychology covering major areas of study within the discipline, including biological bases of behavior, learning and conditioning, memory and cognition, motivation and emotion, social and cultural influences on behavior and attitudes, personality, health psychology, and mental illness. Select sections include an Academic Service-Learning project (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). Required for the Psychology major and minor.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PSYC 189Psychology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PSYC 200Profession of Psychology: Introduction1.00
This course is for students who are entering, or considering entering, psychology as a major and a career field and is part one of a two-part series required for psychology majors. It describes professional career specialties and discusses values and ethical principles of the profession. Other topics that may be covered include retrieval on psychology topics, interaction with community resources, and introductory interpersonal professional skills. Provides experience in information retrieval on psychology topics. Required for the Psychology major.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed PSYC 101.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PSYC 225Sensation And Perception3.00
Sensory and central processes by which information from the environment is received and interpreted. Includes receptors and neural processing, thalamic and cortical processing, and principles of perception. Meets the Learning, Cognition, and Language requirement for the Psychology major.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PSYC 230Social Cognition3.00
How do we think about the social world around us? How do we form impressions and explain our own and others' behavior? This course will explore the automatic and controlled cognitive processes that shape our feelings, motivations, decisions, and biases. Additionally, we will examine how fundamental cognitive patterns form the basis for creating and maintaining prejudice. Meets the Learning, Cognition, and Language requirement for the Psychology major.
University Studies Requirements:
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
PSYC 258Gender, Psychology and Society3.00
Discussion and study of development of gender roles across the lifespan. Topics include the social construction of sex and gender differences, status and power, feminist psychology, childhood and adolescence, relationships, family, work and achievement, and diversity. Meets the Diverse Perspectives requirement for Psychology major. Meets a requirement for the Gender Studies minor. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course, involving a 15-hour community placement commitment (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). Cross-listed as PSYC/GST 258.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PSYC 260Personality3.00
Insight into personality can be gained from many different points of view. Covers the major theoretical approaches to personality, including the psychonalytic, learning theory, humanistic, trait and sociobiological genetic approaches. Includes consideration of varying topics of research interest, such as gender roles, locus of control, infant and adult attachment, cultural variation, violence, resilience. Meets the Individual, Social and Developmental requirement for the Psychology major.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
PSYC 270Psychology of Men and Masculinity3.00
This course is devoted to exploring men's experience in society, the cultural messages men receive about masculinity, and the implications of these for behavior and mental health. Topics include: ideology about the transition from boyhood to manhood, the privileges and perils of manhood status, men's friendships, work primacy, health issues, intimacy and power issues with women, negotiating male sexuality, male violence, and assumptions regarding men's role in the family unit. This is a course for both women and men about issues related to the social construction of masculinity in our culture. Cross-listed as PSYC/GST 270. Meets the Diverse Perspectives requirement for Psychology major.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
PSYC 275Reading and Writing for Psychology3.00
This course builds fundamental skills in reading primary scientific literature and writing using the conventions of the social and behavioral sciences. The fundamentals of preparing a paper using APA style will also be covered. Required for the Psychology major.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed PSYC 101.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PSYC 289Psychology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PSYC 300Profession of Psychology: Professional Development2.00
The second in a two-part series required of majors, this course will allow students to develop a portfolio that will help them as they prepare for a career in psychology and professional development skills such as writing resumes or cover letters, interviewing, and conducting job searches or appropriate graduate school programs for career aspirations. Required for the Psychology major.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed Psychology 200.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PSYC 301Statistics for Psychological Research3.00
Methods of measurement and data analysis. Includes basic descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, tests for inequality of means, probability of discrete events, and nonparametric tests of association. Required for the Psychology major.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking PSYC 301 is having completed PSYC 101 and MATH University Studies requirement.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PSYC 303Research Methodology in Psychology3.00
Experimental and other research designs. Ethical principles of psychology. Required for the Psychology major.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed PSYC 275 and PSYC 301.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PSYC 305Applied Behavior Analysis3.00
A two-pronged approach to behavior analysis and modification. First, basic learning principles and phenomena are discussed (both Classical and Operant Conditioning). Second, these principles are applied to modify socially significant behaviors. Particular focus paid to how ABA can be applied to the treatments of mental disorders, improving the quality of life for people with disabilities, and modifying personal habits. Meets the Learning, Cognition, and Language requirement for the Psychology major, involving a 15-20 hour community placement commitment. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course (see Academic Service-Learning for more details).
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PSYC 310Social Psychology3.00
Study, discussion, and demonstration/experiments into the nature and causes of individual behavior and thought in social situations. Topics range from love, cooperation, and helping to prejudice, conflict, and aggression and cultural influences on these behaviors. Meets the Individual, Social and Developmental requirement for the Psychology major.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PSYC 311The Psychology of Close Relationships3.00
Designed to acquaint students with selected theories, basic research, and applied research in the area of close relationships and to increase students' skill and comfort in oral expression, critical analysis, and written communication through assignments and class discussions. Students read both classic and recent journal articles and chapters on a wide range of topics in the field of close relationships (sibling relationships, friendships, and romantic relationships-both heterosexual and homosexual). Encourages students to think critically about the components of healthy relationships. Meets the Individual, Social and Developmental requirement for the Psychology major and minor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PSYC 320Health Psychology3.00
Study of the impact of biological, physiological, social, and cultural factors on health and illness. Topics include physiological systems of the body, mind-body interactions, stress and coping, lifestyle and health, psychoneuroimmunology, pain, cross-cultural perspectives on health and illness, and management of chronic and terminal illness. Meets the Adjustment and Well-being requirement for the Psychology major.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PSYC 350Behavioral Neuroscience3.00
Study of the biological systems which underlie human behavior. Covers neural structure and physiology, genetic coding and hormones. Specific topics of interest to psychology are included, such as mental illness, the sleep-waking cycle, sensation, language, memory, stress, and sexuality. Meets the Biological Aspects of Behavior requirement for the Psychology major.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PSYC 352Motivation And Emotion3.00
Introduction to the study of human motivation and emotion. Behavioral, cognitive, social, and humanistic theories of motivation will be explored. Major theories/models of emotion, in addition to student-selected topics in this area will be included. Meets the Adjustment and Well-Being requirement for the Psychology major.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
PSYC 353Psychopharmacology3.00
Students will examine how drugs influence the brain and behavior. Specifically, the course will discuss basic pharmacology (mechanisms of drug action in the brain) as well as overt behavioral and psychological changes rendered by the drug. Both legal (e.g. Prozac, alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine) and illegal (e.g. marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamines and LSD) drugs will be discussed. Issues related to addiction and treatment will also be examined. Meets the Biological Aspects of Behavior requirement for the Psychology major.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PSYC 360Culture and Identity3.00
Introduction to the effects of culture on who we are and how we think of ourselves (and others). Central themes: How does culture construct the categories that come to define our identities (e.g., race, gender, class)? How does this differ from one cultural context (i.e., region; nation; continent) to the next? How do these constructs shape our beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors? How does this contribute to intergroup / international conflict and misunderstanding? Classroom activities and assignments are aimed at confronting, acknowledging, questioning, and challenging the automatic assumptions that result from our own singular cultural experience, and experiencing differences in culture. Meets the Diverse Perspectives requirement for the Psychology major.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
PSYC 362Psychological Disorders3.00
Survey of major forms of psychopathology, including diagnostic criteria and clinical features of specific mental disorders, in addition to research on etiology and approaches to treatment. Meets the Adjustment and Well-Being requirement for Psychology major. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course, which may involve a 15-hour community placement commitment. (see Academic Service-Learning for more details).
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
PSYC 372Child and Adolescent Development3.00
Surveys the science and application of child and adolescent development, focusing on the physical, cognitive, and social changes that occur from conception through adolescence. The course covers methods and theory, and may highlight moral development, cultural differences, genetics, aggression, media and thought processes as they relate to various age groups. Meets the Individual, Social and Developmental requirement for the Psychology major. Qualifies as an Academic Service Learning course involving a 15-hour community placement commitment for on-campus sections and a semester-long project for online sections. (see Academic Service-Learning for more details).
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PSYC 373Adulthood and Aging3.00
Examines the social, cognitive, and physical changes that occur through adulthood and older adulthood. Longitudinal and life-span approaches to development are highlighted along with how a changing life expectancy and demographic population are affecting research and quality of life in the population. Meets the Individual, Social and Developmental requirement for the Psychology major. Qualifies as an Academic Service-Learning course, involving a 20-hour community placement commitment for on-campus sections and a semester-long project for online sections. (see Academic Service-Learning for more details).
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PSYC 389Psychology Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PSYC 390Special Topics in Psychology1.00 - 3.00
Consideration of special topics related to the field of Psychology. Because the course content will vary, the student may take up to nine credits.
PSYC 403Memory and Cognition3.00
Discussion of theory and research into cognitive processes, including attention, memory, problem-solving, and decision-making. Meets the Learning, Cognition and Language requirement for the Psychology major.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
PSYC 404Senior Research3.00
Designing, implementing, and reporting an independent research study in psychology. Required for the Psychology major.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having completed PSYC 101 and PSYC 303.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PSYC 462Theories of Psychotherapy3.00
Survey and critical evaluation of major psychotherapeutic approaches for treatment. Includes psychoanalytic/psychodynamic therapies, humanistic-existential approaches, and exposure-based, behavioral and cognitive treatments in addition to constructivist, feminist, culture-sensitive, and integrative therapies. Meets the Adjustment and Well-Being requirement for Psychology major.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
PSYC 464Psychological Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment3.00
Addresses methods of psychological assessment, diagnosis, psychological treatment approaches, training and professional roles, and specializations within the field. Meets the Adjustment and Well-being requirement for the Psychology major.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
PSYC 476Psycholinguistics3.00
Examination of the role of psychological factors in the use of language, the relationship between language and thought, psychological approaches to meaning, and disorders of speech and language. Meets the Learning, Cognition and Language requirement for the Psychology major.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PSYC 489Psychology Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
PSYC 490Independent Study1.00 - 9.00
Planning, execution and report of original research or special study on a topic in psychology. Approval of the faculty advisor who will guide the research or study must be secured before registration. Prerequisite: 15 credits in psychology or consent of instructor. A maximum of nine credits may be earned under this course number, taken in one or more semesters.
 
SO W - Social Work
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
SO W 121Introduction To Social Work3.00
Overview of the social work profession, including its historical roots, practice settings, clients served, methods of practice, and values and ethics. Also provides an overview of knowledge and skills needed for generalist social work practice with various minority and special populations, including American Indians. Twenty hours of required service learning in a community social service agency provides an added opportunity to learn about the profession. Open to all majors.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
SO W 189Social Work Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to UW-S course.
SO W 289Social Work Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
SO W 301Study Abroad0.00 - 6.00
Field trips designed by the faculty to give students direct experiences in foreign countries. Each program includes preparatory reading, orientation meetings, a faculty-supervised study tour, and a concluding reflection or action. Students must obtain approval for taking these courses prior to participation. For specific degree requirements, please consult your advisor. May be repeated only if the content is different. As offered.
Prerequisites:
Completion of SOW 121 with a grade of C or better.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
SO W 325Ecology of Social Welfare Policy3.00
First in a two-course sequence. Provides an ecological overview of policymaking-how differing systems and values interact to create the policymaking environment. Begins with a review of the history of social welfare and uses this historical lens to examine the structure of present social welfare policies and service programs. Focuses on understanding the political forces and processes which impact social policy development, as well as upon how ethical, cultural, social and economic justice issues impact the creation of social welfare policy and programs at the local, regional, national and international levels. Open to all majors.
Prerequisites:
Completion of SO W 121 with a grade of C or above.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SO W 326Methods of Practice: Social Welfare Policy Advocacy3.00
Second in a two-course social policy sequence. Builds upon the ecological foundation established in SO W 325. Students build critical thinking and other practical skills necessary to conduct social welfare policy analysis. Students will be introduced to the concepts of regulation and resistance, and apply those to understanding current and historical social welfare policies. Students will be taught how to propose social welfare policy alternatives to meet the service, economic and social justice needs of vulnerable regional people. Finally, students will be trained to apply advocacy skills and to use social and economic justice principles in addressing social welfare needs.
Prerequisites:
Formal admission to the SW Cohort and completion of SO W 325, SO W 340, SO W 341 and SO W 344 with a grade of C or above
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SO W 329Crisis Intervention3.00
In-depth study of the theoretical basis of what constitutes a crisis, crisis intervention and the steps to be taken in crisis resolution. Focuses on micro, mezzo and macro applications of crisis intervention models and practice skills, examining both situational and maturational crises and the implications of crisis intervention for work with families, groups and communities, and at the international level. Open to all majors.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
SO W 340Methods of Practice: Interpersonal Skills for Social Workers3.00
Teaches future social work practitioners interpersonal helping skills within a solution focused perspective. Emphasis is on interpersonal communication and development of interviewing skills ranging from basic to advanced. Students will be taught the conscious use of self, the use of empathy, ethics and boundary issues encountered in interviewing, and examine cross-cultural differences in the interpersonal skills process. Interviewing with specific populations will also be discussed including work with children, people in crisis and involuntary clients. Exercises, role playing and simulations focused on situations encountered specifically at the micro and mezzo of social work practice are used to enhance learning.
Prerequisites:
Formal admission into the Social Work program cohort. Corequisites are enrollment in SO W 341 and SO W 344
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SO W 341Methods of Practice: Individual Case Work3.00
This course is devoted to development of the entry-level social work practitioner. Focuses on understanding and using current models and theories of social work practice employed by the generalist social worker in casework with individuals, particularly the ethnic/socially sensitive perspective, the ecological model, the problem-solving model, the task-centered approach, evidence-based approach, and the strengths perspective. Course delineates the basic social work helping process: engagement including exploration and data gathering, assessment and planning, intervention, monitoring and evaluation, and termination. Course components also include varying forms of professional documentation and application of the NASW Code of Ethics. Emphasis on presenting students with professional knowledge, values, ethics, and skills to think critically about and conduct effective case work with individuals.
Prerequisites:
Formal admission into the Social Work program cohort. Corequisites are enrollment in SO W 340 and SO W 344
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SO W 344Human Behavior In the Social Environment I (HBSE I)3.00
Examines social work perspectives, knowledge and theory related to human development across the life span in relation to their biological, psychological, intellectual, social, spiritual and cultural contexts. Knowledge from the social sciences is integrated to provide a comprehensive view of people interacting with their environments.
Prerequisites:
Formal admission into the Social Work program cohort. Corequisites are enrollment in SO W 340 and SO W 341.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SO W 345Human Behavior in the Social Environment II (HBSE II)3.00
Study of the basic concepts of social systems theory particularly relevant to macro level issue impact with vulnerable and at risk populations. Knowledge from the social sciences is integrated to provide a basis for intervention with individuals, families, and communities impacted by the intersectionality of discrimination and oppression. Special emphasis is made on self-examination in relation to ethical, social justice, and human diversity issues and on acquiring transferable sets of skills in learning to interact effectively with populations that have experienced trauma, marginalization and oppression.
Prerequisites:
Completion of SO W 340, SO W 341 and SO W 344 with a grade of C or above in all courses. Enrollment in SO W 365 and SO W 368 are corequisites.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SO W 350Introduction to Addiction and Recovery3.00
Overview of the dynamics of addiction, examining societal attitudes and policies and the impact upon individuals, families, agencies and communities. Includes description of the recovery process and the role of social work, criminal justice and other helping professionals in the treatment of addiction. Opportunity to conduct intensive study of this area. Emphasis is placed on learning to interact effectively with vulnerable and at-risk populations. Open to all majors.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Summer Terms
SO W 365Method of Practice: Social Work with Groups3.00
This course uses the basic framework of social work practice, theory, helping processes and skills examined in SOW 340 and 341. Primary emphasis on development of skills to work with both professional and client small-group systems. Group work includes learning effective practice approaches with people from diverse client groups and using the group setting to impact change. The course focuses on understanding stages and dynamics of group process, using groups to address social and economic justice issues and resolving ethical dilemmas that may arise in a group practice context.
Prerequisites:
Completion of SO W 340, SO W 341, and SO W 344 with a grade of C or above in all courses. SO W 345 and SO W 368 are corequisites for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SO W 366Methods of Practice: Agency, Community and Global Practice3.00
This course is devoted to the development of the entry-level generalist social work practitioner. It builds upon the basic framework of social work casework practice, theory, helping processes and skills examined in SO W 340 (Methods I), 341 (Methods II), and 344 (HBSE I). Primary emphasis on macro practice at the agency and community levels, including working effectively at the local, state, national and global levels. Focuses on the values and ethics, knowledge and skills needed for practice within agency and community settings. Includes content on 1) conscious use of self in macro levels of practice, 2) resolution of ethical dilemmas encountered in macro practice situations, 3) organizational planning, administration and supervision, and 4) conducting assessments of community need and 5) grant writing.
Prerequisites:
Completion of SO W 345, SO W 365, and SO W 368 are prerequisites with a grade of C or above in all courses. SO W 380 and 326 are corequisites for the course
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SO W 368Methods of Practice: Social Work with Families3.00
This course uses the basic framework of social work practice, theory, helping processes and skills examined in SOW 340 and 341. Primary emphasis on development of skills to work with various types of family systems. Emphasis will include learning effective practice approaches with people from diverse families and using the family setting to help impact change. Course focuses on engagement, assessment and intervention strategies, recognizing and resolving ethical dilemmas, and social and economic justice issues within family practice contexts.
Prerequisites:
Completion of SO W 340, SO W 341, and SO W 344 with a grade of C or above in all courses
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SO W 380Methods of Practice: Social Work Research3.00
This course introduces basic concepts and approaches of social science research. Specific focus on agency-based approaches often employed by social work researchers, and emphasis on understanding the research process including conceptualization, planning, data collection, data analysis, and research writing. Express attention given to ethical and diversity issues often encountered in social work research writing. Students will also contribute to a program evaluation research selected by the instructor.
Prerequisites:
Completion of SO W 345, SO W 365, and SO W 368 are prerequisites with a grade of C or above in all courses. SO W 366 and 326 are corequisites for the course and either MATH 130 or PSYC 301 with a grade of C or above.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SO W 386Working with American Indian Families3.00
Focuses on issues related to contemporary American Indian family life, including recognition of the importance of American Indian tribal contexts and community-based assets; development and implementation of the Indian Child Welfare Act; impact of sovereignty and other social policy issues on American Indian families; and effective social work approaches to use when helping American Indian families. Offers an opportunity to better understand and work more effectively with American Indian families. Open to non-majors and can be used as a General Education diversity requirement. Cross-listed FNS/SOW 386.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
SO W 389Social Work Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
SO W 420Prep for Field Seminar0.00
A non-credit course required of all social work majors in the semester prior to field internship. Activities include two one-hour seminars to discuss internship expectations, planning, and preparation and meeting with the Field Coordinator for placement. Students also engage in resume prep, job skill development and formal steps to ensure the social work internship. Pass/Fail.
Prerequisites:
Completion of SO W 340, 341, 344, 345, 365 and 368 with a grade of C or above in all courses.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
SO W 422Social Work Field Instruction I5.00
The student internship consisting of one half of the required 450 hours jn a community agency.
Prerequisites:
Completion of SO W 325, 326, 340, 341, 344, 345, 365, 366, 368 and 380 with a grade of C or above in all courses and completion of SO W 420 with a pass. Enrollment in SO W 423 is a corequisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
SO W 423Social Work Field Seminar I1.00
A weekly or bi-weekly seminar to discuss social work content related to field internship.
Prerequisites:
Enrollment in SO W 422 is corequisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
SO W 426Selected Topics in Social Work3.00
Intensive study of a specific area. This is a Social Work elective and may be repeated for credit when topics are different. Open to non-majors. On demand.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
SO W 427Social Work Field Instruction II5.00
The second half of the required 450 hours of field internship.
Prerequisites:
Completion of SO W 325, 326, 340, 341, 344, 345, 365, 366, 368 and 380 with a grade of C or above in all courses, and completion of SO W 420 with a grade of pass is prerequisite. Enrollment in SO W 428 is corequisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
SO W 428Social Work Field Seminar II1.00
A weekly or bi weekly seminar to discuss social work content related to field internship.
Prerequisites:
Enrollment in SO W 427 is corequisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
SO W 480Research Projects3.00
While registered for these credits, students complete the individually designed and/or team research projects proposed in SO W 380 Social Work Research Methods.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of SO W 380 and MATH 130 or PSYC 301 with a grade of C or better in all courses.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
SO W 489Social Work Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-S course.
SO W 498Independent Projects1.00 - 4.00
Students complete an intensive independent study project. Student self-directed study, with instructor input, for which the student develops a detailed contract to guide the project. Contract must demonstrate understanding, application and integration of the social work topic under study. Contract must address ethical, diversity and social justice implications of topic chosen. The class may be designed around any one of a number of relevant social work topics. Instructor's approval required and a permission number needed to register. 1-4 credits.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is having declared SO W as the Major and completion of SO W 121 with a grade of C or above.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms

Human Behavior, Justice and Diversity Department Contact Information Top of Page

Human Behavior, Justice and Diversity Department
University of Wisconsin - Superior
Swenson Hall 3061
Belknap and Catlin Ave.
P.O. Box 2000
Superior, WI 54880
Phone: 715-394-8423
Email: sstocker@uwsuper.edu