Natural Sciences

Mission Statement Top of Page

Our mission is to foster intellectual growth and career preparation (graduate programs, professional programs, or work in natural sciences) in accordance with the liberal arts tradition at UW-Superior. As a science department, we focus on giving students a solid knowledge base and the skills in their respective subjects. Science students will know, understand, apply, and communicate the principles and facts related to their particular disciplines.

Faculty and Staff Top of Page

Bajjali, William - Professor, Geology and GIS
Breckenridge, Andrew - Professor, Geology
Burkett, Edward - Professor, Biology
Cook, Peter - Associate Professor, Physics
Danz, Nicholas - Professor, Biology
Lane, James - Professor, Chemistry
Nifoussi, Shanna - Assistant Professor, Biology
Rios Mendoza, Lorena - Associate Professor, Chemistry
Schmude, Kurt - Professor, Biology
Schuldt, Jeffrey - Professor, Biology
Waxman, Michael - Professor, Chemistry

Majors Top of Page

Minors Top of Page

Certificates Top of Page

Associate Degrees Top of Page

Course Descriptions Top of Page

Go to:
AIRS - Aerospace Studies
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
AIRS 101Foundations of the U.S. Air Force1.00
Part one of two-part survey of the U.S. Air Force. Role of the military in U.S. society; military history; officership; professionalism; core values; career opportunities; customs/courtesies; communicative skills. AIRS 111 Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets, must be taken at the same time, and complements this course by providing followership experiences.
Prerequisites:
Corequisite for taking this course is AIRS 111.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 102Foundations of US Air Force1.00
Survey of the U.S. Air Force. Role of the military in U.S. society; military history; officership; professionalism; core values; career opportunities; customs/courtesies; communicative skills. AIRS 112 Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets, must be taken at the same time, and complements this course by providing followership experiences.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 112 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 111AFROTC GMC Leadership Laboratory0.00 - 1.00
Practical environment giving leadership training while being instructed on military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 101 is co-requisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 112AFROTC GMC Leadership Laboratory0.00 - 1.00
Practical environment giving leadership training while being instructed on military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 102 and AIRS 111 are corequisites for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 189Aerospace Studies Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
AIRS 201Evolution of the US Air Force Air and Space Power1.00
Air Force heritage; development/deployment of air power, a primary element of U.S. national security; leadership; ethics and values. Leadership development based on student participation in group problem solving. Oral/written communication development. AIRS 211 Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets, must be taken at the same time, and complements this course by providing followership experiences.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 211 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 202Evolution of the US Air Force Air and Space Power1.00
Air Force heritage; development/deployment of air power, a primary element of U.S. national security; leadership; ethics and values. Leadership development based on student participation in group problem solving. Oral and written communication development. AIRS 212 Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets, must be taken at the same time, and complements this course by providing followership experiences.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 212 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 211AFROTC GMC Leadership Laboratory0.00 - 1.00
Practical environment giving leadership training while being instructed on military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 201 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 212AFROTC GMC Leadership Laboratory0.00 - 1.00
Practical environment giving leadership training while being instructed on military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 202 and AIRS 211 are corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 289Aerospace Studies Elective0.60
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
AIRS 301Air Force Leadership Studies3.00
Comprehensive study of leadership/quality management fundamentals; professional knowledge; organizational doctrine and ethics; and communications skills required of today's Air Force officer. Leadership and management case studies.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 311 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 302Air Force Leadership Studies3.00
Comprehensive study of leadership/quality management fundamentals; professional knowledge; organizational doctrine; ethics; and communications skills required of today's Air Force officer. Case studies examine leadership/management situations as a means of exercising practical application of concepts being studied.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 312 and consent of instructor are prerequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 311AFROTC POC Leadership Laboratory1.00 - 2.00
Practical environment giving leadership training through teaching freshmen and sophomores military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Pass-Fail only.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 301 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 312AFROTC POC Leadership Laboratory1.00 - 2.00
Practical environment giving leadership training through teaching freshmen and sophomores military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required.
Prerequisites:
AIRS 302 and AIRS 311 are corequisites for this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 389Aerospace Studies Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent ot a UW-Superior course.
AIRS 401National Security Affairs3.00
Advanced leadership development; national security processes, regional studies, doctrine, the military as a profession, civilian control of the military. Must take AIRS 411 Leadership Laboratory at the same time, providing advanced leadership experiences and the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 402Preparation for Active Duty3.00
Advanced leadership development; advanced leadership ethics, doctrine, the military as a profession, officership, military justice. Must take AIRS 412 Leadership Laboratory at the same time, providing advanced leadership experiences and the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 411AFROTC POC Leadership Laboratory1.00 - 2.00
Practical environment giving leadership training through teaching freshmen and sophomores military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Taken concurrently with AIRS 401.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
AIRS 412AFROTC POC Leadership Laboratory1.00
Practical environment giving leadership training through teaching freshmen and sophomores military customs and courtesies, physical fitness, military drill and the general Air Force environment. Two physical fitness attendances each week; a physical fitness diagnostics test and a physical fitness test are all required. Taken concurrently with AIRS 402.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
AIRS 420Leadership Practicum1.00 - 4.00
Practical applicaton of leadership and management in structured realistic situations.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
AIRS 421Leadership Practicum1.00 - 4.00
Practical application of leadership and management in structured realistic situations.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
AIRS 489Aerospace Studies Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
BIOL - Biology
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
BIOL 111Plants and People4.00
Course designed to integrate the science of plants with a wide range of societal issues including genetically modified foods, medicines, invasive species, and rain gardens. Laboratory includes hands-on experiments in applied botany that utilize the University greenhouse. No prerequisite. Does not count towards the Biology major. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 115Human Biology4.00
University Studies course investigating the structure and function of the human body as related to areas of health and disease. Designed to meet the University Studies requirement for laboratory science. Does not count toward the Biology major. Not open to those having taken BIOL 270, or 280. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours).
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Spring and Summer Terms
BIOL 123Concepts In Biology4.00
Introduction for non-Biology majors to important biological concepts including chemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, plant and animal form and function, and ecology. Laboratory exercises are integrated with lectures and designed to be experimental and inquiry driven. Fulfills the University Studies requirement for laboratory science. Does not count toward the Biology major. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BIOL 130Principles of Biology I4.00
Introduction to important principles of chemistry, cellular, molecular, and evolutionary biology, and the diversity of life. Laboratory experiments are inquiry driven. Intended as the first of a two-course sequence for biology majors, and students with a strong interest in the life sciences. Fulfills the University Studies laboratory science requirement. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BIOL 132Principles of Biology II4.00
The second course in a two-course sequence intended for Biology majors or minors, and other students with a strong interest in the life sciences. Introduces students to the development, structure and function of both plants and animals and the basic principles of ecology. Laboratory exercises are integrated with lectures and designed to be experimental and inquiry driven. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours).
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of BIOL 130 or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BIOL 170Biological Inquiry for Teachers2.00
This course uses inquiry-based science methods to answer open-ended biological questions that have environmental connections. This course is required of Elementary Education majors and satisfies environmental science requirements for the Wisconsin Teaching Licensure and the UW-Superior University Studies program. Lecture one hour, laboratory two hours.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BIOL 181Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in biology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Instructor permission to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 189Biology Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BIOL 270Human Anatomy & Physiology I4.00
First semester of a two-semester sequence investigating the structure and function of human body systems and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within and across each system. Examination of tissues and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and sensory systems. . (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
BIOL 130 or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BIOL 280Human Anatomy & Physiology II4.00
Continuation of a two-semester sequence investigating the structure and function of human body systems and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within and across each system. Examination of the endocrine, digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
BIOL 270 or instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BIOL 281Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in biology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Instructor permission to enroll in this course.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 289Biology Elective1.00 - 50.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BIOL 300Marine Biology3.00
Introduction to the biology and ecology of marine plants and animals, coral reefs, the deep sea, rocky shores, marine mammals, fisheries, aquaculture, pollution, and the conservation of marine resources.(Lecture three hours).
Prerequisites:
BIOL 330 or 340 or Permission of Instructor
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 303Forest Ecology and Management4.00
Overview of major factors affecting forests, including disturbance, succession, wildlife, harvest systems, and ecosystem management. Emphasis on forests of the western Great Lakes region. Field trips develop identification and measurement skills and test ecological hypotheses. One weekend field trip. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 305Evolution3.00
A view of the scope, significance and mechanisms of evolutionary concepts in modern biology. (Lecture three hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BIOL 312Biogeography and Conservation3.00
Study of the geographical distribution of plants and animals across space and time. Topics include environmental causes of species range structure, species diversity, island biogeography, evolutionary diversification, and conservation biogeography. (Lecture three hours.) BIOL 340 or BIOL 305 recommended.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 315Plant Physiology4.00
Study of functions and physiological properties of plants, from the molecular scale up through ecosystem scale of biological organization. Main topics include water and nutrient transport, cell structure and function, nutrient relationships, photosynthesis, growth and development, and metabolism. Lab exercises emphasize experimental approaches using modern technology. (Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, and CHEM 106, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 316Medical Terminology2.00
Study of basic medical terminology. Prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, special endings, plural forms, abbreviations, and symbols are emphasized. A programmed learning, word-building systems approach is used to learn, construct, and analyze new terms as they relate to the function and location of body systems. No prerequisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BIOL 318Immunology3.00
Studying the relationship between cellular form and function to determine how macromolecules direct what a cell does. Current research techniques will be utilized to investigate how this dynamic interplay balances health versus disease. Critical processes such as proliferation, survival, and signaling pathways will be explored. (Lecture three hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or instructor permission
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BIOL 325Plant Taxonomy4.00
Provides the skills and background to identify flowering plants of northern Wisconsin and Minnesota. Lecture topics focus on floral structure, classification, and distribution of plant families of regional importance, while labs focus on identification of living plant materials using dichotomous keys. Each student will prepare a plant collection. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 330Genetics4.00
Integrating the principles and techniques of Mendelian and molecular genetics to emphasize how biological information is inherited and expressed. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
BIOL 132 and CHEM 105, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
BIOL 335Aquatic Entomology3.00
Introduction to the identification and ecological relationships of freshwater insects and related invertebrates of the north central United States. (Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
BIOL 340Ecology4.00
Introduction to basic principles of ecology emphasizing interactions between organisms and their environment. Local ecosystems examined. CHEM 105 is recommended. (Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 132 or permission from the instructor
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BIOL 350Limnology4.00
Study of freshwater biology including the physical and chemical attributes of the environment as well as plants and animals found in lakes and streams. CHEM 105 is recommended. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
BIOL 355Microbiology4.00
Exploring how the structure, function and genetics of microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa) influence our everyday world. This includes microbes relevant to human health and industry; and the biological and chemical defenses we use to regulate them. The laboratory involves culture and identification techniques as well as modern applications of molecular biology. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 105 and either BIOL 330 or BIOL 340.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 360Parasitology4.00
The structure, habits, life cycles, classifications and identification of parasites and the diseases they cause. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 365Entomology4.00
The study of the anatomy, physiology, classification and identification of hexapods (insects). Includes a survey of hexapod orders, their economic and medical importance, and ecological topics. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 367Ornithology4.00
An introduction to the study of birds. General principles of classification, structure, distribution, migration, life histories, and habits are covered in lecture and text. Laboratory periods devoted largely to identification of birds in the field. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Biology 330 or 340 is required
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
BIOL 380Vertebrate Biology4.00
Life histories, habits, habitats, distribution, classification, and recognition of common vertebrates of the north central United States. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
BIOL 382Ichthyology4.00
An introduction to the classification, structure, physiology, distribution, and life histories of fishes. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
BIOL 330 or 340 or Permission of Instructor
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 389Biology Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer Credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalen to a UW-Superior course.
BIOL 399Cancer Biology3.00
Investigating the cellular, molecular and genetic origins of the human diseases classified together as cancer. Utilizing both scientific and popular literature, historical context will be provided and current research aimed at improving both diagnostic and therapeutic options will be explored. Topics include carcinogenesis, oncogenes, tumor suppressors, microenvironment influence, migration, invasion and metastasis.
Prerequisites:
BIOL 330 or permission of instructor
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 400Animal Physiology4.00
A study of normal and abnormal functions and vital processes of organ systems and how these processes are important to animals as they adapt to their environments.(Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 405Neurobiology3.00
Introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system, including neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and systems neurobiology. Topics include the properties of neurons, glia, and the mechanisms and organization underlying neural signaling; sensation and sensory processing; movement and its central control; and diseases and disorders of the nervous system. Discussions of neurobiological methods and reading of current neurobiological literature will be included.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of one course from each of the following bracketed groups: [PSYC 350 or BIOL 330] and [PSYC 275 or BIOL 330 or BIOL 340] or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
BIOL 420Field Biology1.00
Study of plants and animals in nature through field trips and observation. Topics change each semester. (Laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
BIOL 431Animal Behavior (Ethology)3.00
An introduction to animal behavior with special attention to behavioral mechanisms and the function of behavior. (Optional concurrent enrollment in BIOL 432.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or BIOL 340, or permission of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 432Animal Behavior Laboratory1.00
Project-oriented course designed to explore the experimental aspects of animal behavior. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement for Biology major.
Prerequisites:
BIOL 431 is a corequisite for this class
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
BIOL 440Cell Biology4.00
Study of the morphology, physiology and genetics of cells. Covers research techniques and modern application of molecular biology. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 and CHEM 106 or permission instructor
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
BIOL 465Laboratory Techniques in Biochemistry and Cell/Molecular Biology2.00
Principles and practices of techniques used in biochemistry and in cell and molecular biology. Includes protein isolation and analysis, enzyme kinetics, carbohydrate analysis, immunological techniques for analysis, and techniques of gene cloning and manipulation. Recommended: CHEM 462, BIOL 355 AND BIOL 440 or concurrent enrollment. (Lecture one hour, laboratory three hours) Cross-listed as: BIOL/CHEM 465.
Prerequisites:
BIOL 330 and CHEM 360 are pre-requisites for this class
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 481Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in biology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Instructor permission to enroll in this course.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is Junior standing or Instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 484Fish Population Ecology and Management4.00
Focuses on two important ecological questions regarding fish populations: 1) What factors cause changes in the size of fish populations? 2) What factors influence the total number of species found in a particular environment? These questions are addressed by investigating how individual fish allocate time and resources in response to environmental conditions, and how different allocation schemes influence individual fitness. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement for Biology major. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 330 or 340, MATH 102 or MATH 113 or equivalent are prerequisites
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
BIOL 489Biology Elective0.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
BIOL 491Research in Biology1.00 - 4.00
A course developed in cooperation with faculty or area research laboratories designed to provide students with practical experience in experimental biology. Candidates for this course must outline a research problem and complete a Contract for Independent Learning prior to registration. (May be repeated for a total of four credits.) Instructor consent required. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement for Biology major.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
BIOL 492Biology Seminar1.00
Study of a topic through literature research. Student studies a topic and effectively summarizes the available information in written and oral form. Presentation techniques are emphasized. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement for Biology major.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
BIOL 496Internship1.00 - 4.00
On-the-job experience with local agencies (e.g. Wisconsin DNR) that provides students with opportunities to apply their skills to practical problems. In collaboration with a faculty sponsor, students must complete a Contract for Independent Learning prior to registration. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
BIOL 497Senior Year Experience1.00
This course provides instruction to develop and deliver an oral presentation in a scientific conference format to serve as a culminating experience for the Biology major. Presentation topics are connected to a capstone project completed in BIOL 491 Research in Biology or BIOL 496 Internship, either of which must be taken as a pre-requisite or co-requisite course. Meets in face-to-face format 2 hours per week.
Typically Offered:
Fall or Spring Terms
 
CHEM - Chemistry
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
CHEM 100Our Chemical Environment2.00
Introduces the concepts of chemistry into the interpretation of chemical effects on the environment. Prerequisite: None. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science (environmental component). Credits cannot be counted toward a Chemistry major or minor. Offered both on campus and online.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHEM 101Elements & The Environment3.00
Introduction to basic concepts of chemistry and their importance in gaining a better understanding and appreciation of our environment. Many topics of current environmental concern will be discussed. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science (environmental component). Credits cannot be counted toward a chemistry major or minor. Students cannot earn credit for both CHEM 100 and 101.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 102Chemistry of Everyday Phenomena4.00
Explores the chemistry of foods, drugs, household chemicals, personal hygiene products, agricultural chemicals, materials and other types of chemistry relevant to the student. Current chemistry topics in the popular press will be critically examined. Topics not usually addressed in other science general education courses will be presented. A small part of the course will be devoted to elementary statistics (evaluation, not calculation) to enable students to understand science and medicine as it is commonly reported. An important but minor part of the course involves discussion of the role of research in technology development and standard of living, and the impact of the chemical industry on the national and world economies. Credits cannot be counted toward a Chemistry major or minor. Prerequisite: None. (Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 103Principles of General Chemistry3.00
This course exposes the students to the main principles of modern chemistry and its applications, as needed for the following Sustainable Management courses: SMFT-315 "Global Environmental Chemistry" and SMGT-320 "Energy for Sustainable Management". Each student is expected to develop a working knowledge of the topics covered in the Power-Point presentations and the textbook, to demonstrate some ability to work independently, and to be able to solve the problems assigned for the homework and comparable exercises.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of MATH 102 with a grade of C- or better is prerequisite for taking this class.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 105General Chemistry I5.00
Introduction to physical and chemical properties of the elements, chemical reactions, gas laws, chemical nomenclature, structure of atoms, chemical bonding, and solutions. Intermediate algebra (MATH 113) or equivalent strongly recommended as prerequisite. (Four lectures and one three-hour laboratory.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 106General Chemistry II4.00
Continuation of CHEM 105 studying chemical equilibria, kinetics, electrochemistry, chemical compounds and reactions, qualitative analysis of ions, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory.
Prerequisites:
CHEM 105 and one of MATH 113, 115, 151 or 240.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CHEM 107Supplementary Problems in General Chemistry II1.00
A course designed to expand and provide extra help on those topics in General Chemistry II which frequently cause difficulty for the less well prepared student. Can only be taken simultaneously with General Chemistry II (CHEM 106). Credits cannot be applied to Chemistry Major or Minor. One Lecture-recitation per week.
Prerequisites:
CHEM 106 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CHEM 181Introductory Topics1.00 - 2.00
Introductory studies of special interest selected by a student and/or faculty member. The course may be independent-study, and it may be either lecture, laboratory, or both. The study most commonly will be introductory laboratory research work by a student considering a chemistry major, but also may be used for other special studies by a highly prepared student in chemistry. Pre- or corequisite: varies with topic and permission of instructor. Individual sections of the course may be offered for a grade or may be offered pass-fail only. May be repeated for a maximum of two credits. Offered upon sufficient demand.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 189Chemistry Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CHEM 205Quant Analysis Lecture3.00
Introductory lecture course in quantitative chemical analysis with major emphasis on classical, wet chemical methods and chemical equilibria. Topics include: concentration calculations, chemical reaction stoichiometry, equivalent weights and normality, titrimetric and gravimetric determinations, acid-base theory, solubilities and precipitation separations, basic electrochemistry, potentiometry, introduction to uv-visible absorbance spectrophotometry. (Three lectures.)
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of CHEM 106, and corequisite is CHEM 206.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 206Quantitative Analysis Laboratory2.00
Introductory laboratory course emphasizing wet chemical methods of quantitative analysis. Representative experiments include titrimetry and basic instrumental determinations. Applications of statistics to data analysis are discussed and applied. (One four-hour lecture/laboratory.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 205 is corequisite for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 281Selected Topics1.00
Individual studies of a special interest selected by a student and/or faculty member. The study may involve seminars, special laboratory study. Prerequisites: varies with topic and consent of instructor. (May be repeated for up to two credits.) Offered on sufficient demand.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 289Chemistry Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CHEM 300Chemistry Of Natural Waters3.00
Emphasizes experimental methods used in investigations of the chemistry of natural water systems and the interpretation of chemical parameters indicative of water quality. Does not count toward chemistry major. (Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 106 is a pre-requisite for this class
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
CHEM 312Organic Chemistry--A Short Course3.00
One-semester survey in organic chemistry covering material which describes the structure, properties, preparation and reactions of the major classes of organic compounds. Additional topics will be selected from chemical bonding, kinetics, mechanisms and spectroscopy. Does not count toward a chemistry liberal education major. Counts toward a chemistry secondary education major. (Three lectures.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 106 is prerequisite and CHEM 313 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 313Intro Organic Chem Lab2.00
One-semester laboratory designed to accompany CHEM 312. Work consists of laboratory preparation and study of the chemical and physical properties of compounds of the types covered in CHEM 312. Co-requisite: CHEM 312. Does not count toward chemistry liberal arts major. Counts toward a chemistry secondary education major. (One-hour lecture-demonstration and one three-hour laboratory.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 312 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 320Organic Chemistry Lecture I3.00
First of a two-semester sequence of courses which make up a standard one-year course in beginning organic chemistry. Study of the structures, properties, preparation and reactions of the major classes of organic compounds. Also includes basic principles of chemical bonding, kinetics, mechanisms and molecular spectroscopy. (Three lectures.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 106 is prerequisite; CHEM 322 AND CHEM 327 are co-requisites.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 321Organic Chem Lecture II3.00
Second of a two-semester sequence of courses which make up a standard one-year course in beginning organic chemistry. Work is made up of the study of the structures, properties, preparation and reactions of the major classes of organic compounds. Also includes basic principles of chemical bonding, kinetics, mechanisms and molecular spectroscopy. (Three lectures.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 320 is prerequisite; CHEM 323 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CHEM 322Organic Chemistry Lab I1.00
First of a two-semester sequence of laboratory courses which accompany CHEM 320 and 321. Consists of laboratory preparation and study of the chemical and physical properties of compounds of the types covered in CHEM 320-321. Some applications of molecular spectroscopy. (Three-hour laboratory)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 320 AND CHEM 327 are co-requisites.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 323Organic Chemistry Lab II1.00
Second of a two-semester sequence of laboratory courses which accompany CHEM 320 and 321. Consists of laboratory preparation and study of the chemical and physical properties of compounds of the types covered in CHEM 320-321. Some applications of molecular spectroscopy. (Three-hour laboratory.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 321 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
CHEM 327Molecular Spectroscopy I1.00
Elementary introduction to the spectroscopic techniques most frequently used by chemists. Brief summaries of the mechanics of the techniques will be given, but major focus is interpretation of spectra generated by the following techniques: mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Students will be expected to identify and sketch structures of simple organic compounds based on spectral interpretation. (One lecture.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 320 is a corequisite for this class
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 345Physical Chemistry Lect I4.00
Exposes students to the main principles of modern thermodynamics and chemical kinetics and their applications. Key points of both areas will be illustrated with the examples of thermodynamics of polymer blends and the effect of formation of meta-stable states in polymer thin films. (Four lectures.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 106, MATH 241, PHYS 202 or PHYS 206, OR permission of instructor are prerequisites.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 346Physical Chemistry Lecture II3.00
Continuation of CHEM 345 emphasizing quantum theory, lasers, spectroscopy, molecular transport, and molecular reaction dynamics. Key points of many of these areas will be illustrated with the phenomenon of surface light-induced drift. (Three lectures.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 345 or permission of instructor. CHEM 348 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
CHEM 347Physical Chemistry Lab I1.00
Laboratory work studies laser photochemistry and other applications of lasers in chemistry, as well as thermodynamical properties of gases and liquids, and calorimetry. (One four-hour laboratory meeting during the last eight weeks of the semester.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 345 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 348Physical Chemistry Lab II2.00
Continuation of CHEM 347 consisting of laboratory studies of the applications of lasers in chemistry, including kinetic measurements, thermodynamical properties of liquids and macromolecules, electrochemistry, and spectroscopy. (One four-hour laboratory.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 346 is a co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
CHEM 360Introduction to Biochemistry3.00
One-semester survey of principles of biological chemistry. Study of the principal compounds of biochemical importance: proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, their chemistry, metabolic breakdown and biosysthesis, enzymes, co-factors, nucleic acids, regulation of cellular systems. Three lectures.
Prerequisites:
CHEM 312 or CHEM 321 are prerequisite.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
CHEM 365Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry3.00
Survey of the basic chemistry of most elements of the periodic table, including natural abundances, typical compounds in the natural state, purification techniques, and modern uses. Periodic trends will be explored and used as an organizing tool in understanding this chemistry. Includes topics such as crystal packing and ionic structures of solids, acid-base theory, and redox reactions.
Prerequisites:
CHEM 106 and CHEM 312 or CHEM 320.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
CHEM 375Instrumental Analysis Lecture3.00
Survey of chemical instrumentation and instrumental methods of analysis. Instrumental methods discussed include: atomic and molecular spectroscopy and spectrometry, chromatography, potentiometry, and voltammetry. Discussion also includes: detection limits and detectability, sensitivity, and methods of data analysis. (Three lectures.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 205 is prerequisite. CHEM 376 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
CHEM 376Instrumental Analysis Lab2.00
Representative experiments in many of the analytical methods discussed in CHEM 375. Some experiments involve digital data acquisition. Computerized methods of data analysis are employed. (One four-hour laboratory.)
Prerequisites:
CHEM 375 is co-requisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Odd Years Only
CHEM 381Intermediate Topics1.00 - 3.00
May be offered for individualized or multiple-student instruction on a particular topic. May be independent study, lecture or laboratory. Topic(s) selected based upon student interest with approval of instructor. Prerequisites: varies with topic. Introductory Physical Chemistry is currently offered as an Intermediate Topic on a regular basis.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
CHEM 389Chemistry Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CHEM 462Advanced Biochemistry3.00
Second semester of a year sequence involving a study of the chemistry of living systems. Takes a more in-depth look at principles covered in the first semester: structure and properties of amino acids and proteins, enzymes, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and nucleic acids, and covers additional topics including enzyme mechanisms, vitamins and co-factors, protein metabolism and bioenergetics.
Prerequisites:
CHEM 321 and CHEM 360 are prerequisite.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
CHEM 465Laboratory Techniques in Biochemistry and Cell/Molecular Biology2.00
Principles and practices of techniques used in biochemistry and in cell and molecular biology. Includes protein isolation and analysis, enzyme kinetics, carbohydrate analysis, immunological techniques for analysis, and techniques of gene cloning and manipulation. Recommended: CHEM 462, BIOL 355 AND BIOL 440 or concurrent enrollment. (Lecture one hour, laboratory three hours) Cross-listed as: BIOL/CHEM 465.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Even Years Only
CHEM 481Special Topics1.00 - 6.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in chemistry selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study. May be repeated when topics are different. Prerequisite: varies with topic.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
CHEM 489Chemistry Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
CHEM 491Senior Research1.00 - 4.00
Individual laboratory investigation of a selected problem to include a study of the related literature and formal reports. Prerequisites: CHEM 346 and approval of instructor. (May be repeated for up to four credits.)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHEM 496Senior Paper1.00
Preparation of a formal paper on an advanced chemistry topic. Topic must be approved by instructor. Instructor consent required. Topic chosen for CHEM 496 may not be appropriate for CHEM 497. Consult instructor of CHEM 497. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 345.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHEM 497Senior Seminar In Chemistry1.00
Each student prepares and gives one or more oral reports on a chemical topic of interest to the student and approved by instructor. Prerequisites: CHEM 345 or senior standing in Chemistry. One lecture-discussion. Does not count toward 400-level credits for ACS certification.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
CHEM 498Internship1.00 - 4.00
A chemistry-related work experience with an industry, business or other organization (e.g. LSRI, LSNERR) that provides students with opportunities to apply their learned skills to practical problems. In collaboration with a faculty sponsor, students must complete a Contract for Independent Learning prior to registration. May be used to satisfy Senior Year Experience requirements.
Prerequisites:
Pre-requisite: CHEM 205 and CHEM 321
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
ENSC - Environmental Science
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
ENSC 100Environmental Science2.00
Basic course in human ecology for students with limited training in science. Emphasizes environmental problems related to human activity in the modern world. Meets the General Education environmental science requirement and meets the Wisconsin Teaching Certification Requirement for Environmental Science. Does not count toward the Biology major. No prerequisite. (Lecture two hours.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
ENSC 350Environmental Science Research Methods2.00
This is a field-based environmental science research methods class that will: 1) provide students with hands-on experience with a suite of research methods, 2) provide examples of real-world science-based problem-solving, and 3) demonstrate how environmental research can provide needed information for natural resource managers to make management decisions.
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of BIOL 340.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
ENSC 489Environmental Science Elective0.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
ENSC 491Research in Environmental Science1.00 - 4.00
A course developed in cooperation with faculty or area research laboratories designed to provide students with practical experience in environmental science. Candidates for this course must outline a research problem and complete a Contract for Independent Learning prior to registration. (May be repeated for a total of four credits.) Instructor consent required. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement for Environmental Science.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
ENSC 496Internship in Environmental Science1.00 - 4.00
On-the-job experience with local agencies (e.g. Wisconsin DNR) that provides students with opportunities to apply their skills to practical problems. In collaboration with a faculty sponsor, students must complete a Contract for Independent Learning prior to registration. May be used to satisfy Senior Experience requirement.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
 
GEOG - Geography
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
GEOG 100World Regional Geography3.00
Develops basic factual knowledge and awareness of the physical and cultural features of the world environment. Explores regional and world scale patterns of resources, climate, applied technology and trade, political alignments, and other aspects of the current world. All world political units are analyzed from a regional perspective. Students gain significant knowledge of world spatial relationships. Offered: Every Fall and Spring Terms on campus; Every Spring Term On Line.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOG 102Cultural Geography3.00
Explores the influence of culture on perceptions, decisions, and interpersonal relations on both planetary and local scales of life. A broad range of cultural topics are considered, including the origins of culture, human development, political and social organization, religions and languages, and evolving human landscapes. Prepares students to be well-informed citizens of our increasingly interconnected global community. Offered On Campus Spring Terms and On Line Fall Terms.
University Studies Requirements:
Diversity
Global Awareness
Social Science
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOG 189Geography Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOG 241Fundamentals of GIS I4.00
Broad introduction to cartography and Geographic Information Systems with emphases on both theory and practice. Fundamental principles of numerical data entry, digitizing, data manipulation and analysis, and interpretation of spatially referenced data will be explored. Additional topics include cartographic basics such as mapping, coordinate systems, projections and remote sensing. Students are introduced to the skills necessary to run a vector-based GIS. The GIS lab offers students an opportunity to use GPS systems and GIS (ArcGIS10 Desktop, ArcGIS Pro, and ArcGIS Online to improve their conceptual and technical GIS skills while working one-on-one with the instructor. Lab will cover map design, geodatabase creation, spatial data download, examining metadata, geoprocessing, digitizing, geocoding, spatial analysis, and 3D-analysis. In the lab each student will carry a real world project using ArcGIS software. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) ITS 108 or basic computer skills recommended. Offered Every Fall and Spring Terms of Even Years Only.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOG 281Special Topics1.00 - 6.00
In-depth study of specialized topics in geography selected by the faculty on the basis of student interests/needs. May include workshops. seminars, special issues, etc. This course may be repeated when topics are different. Offered on demand.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOG 289Geography Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOG 298Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Advanced study for students who have shown themselves capable of independent work, carried out under the direction of a faculty member chosen by the student. Offered on demand. Instructor consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOG 302Economic Geography3.00
Study of how spatial organization of economic activities affects such issues as economic growth, employment, investment patterns, mobility, and the prices paid for goods. Industrial economic activities are examined by addressing issues such as why some areas are more suitable than others for economic activities and how markets function in the real world. Transportation networks that connect areas and issues of global interdependence are central themes in this course. This course has been approved as Writing Certificate Eligible (WCE)--see section of catalog for WCE Description/details. (lecture two hours, laboratory two hours) Offered On Campus Fall Terms, and On Line Spring Terms.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course for TRSP majors is completion of ECON 250 and ECON 251. Non-TRSP majors are required to take a GEOG course or consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOG 343Fundamentals of GIS II4.00
Introduction to GIS-specific content, including database, advance editing using topology, geocoding, and some advanced analysis operations. It covers geo-statistical analysis, site suitability and modeling, raster analysis, and ArcScan tool. Introduces students to some advance functionalities of ArcGIS Desktop, ArcGIS Pro, and introduction to ArcGIS online. Laboratory activities include mapping density, mapping change, finding what's inside, finding what's nearby, measuring geographic distribution, analyzing pattern, and identifying clusters, best suitable sites, and modeling. Students examine a wide range of GIS functions using the diverse analysis and data management tools. Each student is required to complete a real world project using GIS software
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GEOG 241.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GEOG 350Geography of Wisconsin3.00
A spatial examination of the state of Wisconsin utilizing both physical and human considerations. It synthesizes and emphasizes the 20th and 21st century environmental issues that are related to physical characteristics such as geologic history, hydrologic, and climatic forces as well as how these physical factors have impacted the human development of the state. Examples of human issues include indigenous and immigrant settlement, economic, and political patterns.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOG 357Advanced Topics in Human/Environment Interaction3.00
Advanced Topics in Human/Environment Interaction is a study of the effects of the physical and biological factors affecting human population growth, evolution, development, and settlement as well as how our behavior impacts the physical world. The influence of environment on human development, and the schools of thought that develop, crosses many disciplinary areas of study. The basic theories integral to biology and geography, often studied separately as part of discipline-­-specific courses, will be integrated into the study of humans and their physical environment. The emphasis of the course is to offer topics from a variety diverse perspectives, with both a reading/lecture and lab component.
Prerequisites:
ENSC 100 or GEOL 120 or Instructor Consent Required.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GEOG 389Geography Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOG 402Urban Planning and Transportation Systems3.00
Comparative examinations of planning theories and practices that shaped the geography of 19th and 20th century urban and suburban areas. Introduction to the interurban and interurban influences of transportation systems on land use and planning will be explored. Stresses the ways in which planners and planning ideologies have responded to different social, economic, political and technological (transportation and communication) innovations and pressures. The class includes an examination of 21st Century problems, pressures and solutions to urban and transportation needs. Qualifies as an Academic-Service Learning course (see Academic Service-Learning for more details). A significant semester-long group AS-L project, which connects the student with the Twin Ports community, is a substantial learning goal in the face-to-face section of this course. Cross-listed as GEOG/TRSP 402. S18, S20.
Prerequisites:
For non-SBE majors, completion of GEOG 302 or consent of Instructor. For SBE majors, completion of GEOG 302 and admission to the SBE program.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
GEOG 442Advanced Principles of GIS4.00
Students learn how to develop and implement various GIS application projects. The course covers spatial data conversion, spatial database management and advance spatial analysis. Introduces image analysis and spatial analysis utilizing the extensions of ArcGIS Desktop and ArcGIS Pro (geostatistical analysist, spatial analyst, network analyst, 3-D analyst) and remote sensing raster analysis). Each student designs a project based on their specialty (biology, environmental science, land use, transportation, hydrogeology, demographics, economic analysis, etc.). Course builds on the principles introduced in GEOG 343 and gives a more in-depth understanding of the technical aspects involved in spatial data handling, analysis, and modeling. Very advanced principles of ArcGIS will be used as theoretical and applied aspects are examined through a series of practical exercises and assignments culminating in the development of a prototype GIS.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GEOG 343
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOG 450Capstone in Geography3.00
This course integrates and extends classroom learning through guided research on student- selected interdisciplinary geography and geography-related topics. After an introduction to geographic research methods and theory, students will conduct an investigation of a spatial question. Students work individually, in consultation with faculty and interaction with peers in class, to produce a final product that is pertinent to the major/minor. Examples of final product are: a formal written research paper, classroom-ready teaching unit, workshop materials for presentation.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOG 452GIS Special Project2.00
This course is an undergraduate level course planned at developing more advanced GIS skills. The course is a project-based course (2 credits) targeted students who have taken the first 2 courses in the GIS minor (GEOG241 and GEOG 343). The class is not introductory and students will begin using more advanced analysis tools in ESRI GIS software (ArcGIS Desktop, ArcGIS Pro, and ArcGIS Online). In this course students will propose, design, and implement a real-world project. Students will identify a concept, a problem or a concern they wish to address or solve, and execute the project to final data products. Student completed the project will demonstrate their proficiency of the subject matter of the GIS applications.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GEOG 241 and GEOG 343
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Every Other Year
GEOG 481Special Topics1.00 - 6.00
In-depth study of specialized topics in geography selected by the faculty on the basis of student interest/need. May include workshops, seminars, special issues, etc. Course may be repeated when topics are different. Offered on demand.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOG 489Geography Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOG 491Undergraduate Research1.00 - 4.00
A course developed in cooperation with faculty or area geography specialists to provide practical experience in experimental geography. Candidates for this course must outline a research problem or focus of study. Registration for credit can only be made after all supervisory and support requirements have been assured and the formal research plan is approved. May be repeated for a total of four credits.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of two GEOG courses and consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOG 492Geography Seminar1.00
Study of a topic through literature research. Each student studies a topic and effectively summarizes the available information in written and oral form. Prerequisite: Two prior geography courses and consent of instructor.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOG 496Internship1.00 - 4.00
On-the-job experience with local agencies such as the Department of Transportation, urban and/or regional planning agencies, historical societies, or other approved geography-related organization designed to provide students with realistic opportunities to apply their skills to practical problems. Registration for credit can only be made after all supervisory and support requirements have been assured. Prerequisite: Two prior geography courses and consent of instructor. Offered on demand.
GEOG 498Independent Study1.00 - 4.00
Advanced study for students who have shown themselves capable of independent work, carried out under the direction of a faculty member chosen by the student. Offered on demand. Instructor consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
 
GEOL - Geology
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
GEOL 110The Dynamic Earth4.00
An introductory science class that emphasizes the foundational principles and concepts of geology. Topics include: minerals, rocks, Earth's internal structure, plate tectonics, geologic structures, the rock cycle, climate change, glaciers, groundwater, geologic structures, the rock cycle, climate change, glaciers, groundwater, geologic resources and earthquakes. One weekend field trip. (lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours).
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOL 120Our Water Resources4.00
The Water & Environment course is designed for all students and aim to train students broadly in water resources. The course will be emphasizing on surface water, groundwater, water use, water quality, dams, water allocation, water use conflict, and emerging water issues. Water resources will be linked to the environmental issues that facing our globe. Problem in global change related to the land surface and water through hydrological cycle, contamination, recharge-discharge, and water scarcity will be addressed. Students will work with various software (Aquachem, GIS, Excel) and learn through the lab and assignments problem solving skills.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Environment
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
GEOL 170Earth Science for Teachers2.00
Broad survey of basic concepts and principles of astronomy, geology, oceanography and meteorology. Emphasizes the relationship between Earth processes and the fundamentals of chemistry, physics, and biology. Designed especially for elementary education majors in order to fulfill an earth science requirement. This class does not meet the General Education requirement for a laboratory science. (Lecture one hour, laboratory two hours.)
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
GEOL 189Geology Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOL 281Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in Geology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. May be repeated when topics are different. Offered on demand. Instructor consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOL 289Geology Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOL 315Climatology3.00
Exploration of the processes that control Earth's climate and influence climate change affect the environment on timescales of hundreds of millions to tens of years. The first half of the course focuses on understanding the various components of the Earth system that affect climate. The second half emphasizes case studies and techniques useful for understanding climate change.
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of BIOL 130, CHEM 105, or GEOL 110.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
GEOL 350Physical Oceanography3.00
Emphasizes the physical and chemical processes that operate in the world's oceans. Topics include: the history of oceanography, plate tectonics of the ocean basins, ocean basin sedimentation, ocean water physical and chemical characteristics, ocean currents, waves and tides, and environmental issues of concern to marine scientists. (Lecture 3 hours)
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking is course is successful completion of GEOL 110.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
GEOL 360Geomorphology4.00
Geomorphology is the study of landscapes and landforms. Geomorphology entails the systematic description of landforms, analysis of the processes that form them, and understanding their response to changes in climate, tectonics, human disturbance, and the progression of time. Includes field trips. (Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours)
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is completion of GEOL 110 and completion or co-enrolled in GEOG 241 or instructor permission.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Even Years Only
GEOL 389Geology Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOL 400Watershed Hydrology4.00
A study of water properties, occurrence, distribution, and movement and their relationship with the environment within each phase of the hydrological cycle. Examines water quantity and quality issues, and water management policies. Uses mix of lecture- and problem-based approaches. Students will be introduced to techniques used in addressing environmental problems such as flooding, water supplies, and groundwater contamination and evaluation. Recommended for science students interested in the environmental sciences and/or securing a position in the environmental field. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite for taking this course is successful completion of CHEM 105 and either GEOL 110 or GEOL 120 or instructor consent. MATH 113 is recommended.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Odd Years Only
GEOL 481Special Topics1.00 - 4.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in Geology selected by the faculty on the basis of student/community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study, etc. May be repeated when topics are different. Offered on demand. Instructor consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
GEOL 489Geology Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
GEOL 491Undergraduate Research1.00 - 4.00
Course developed in cooperation with faculty and area research facilities designed to provide students with practical experience in geological research. Candidates for this course must outline a research problem. Registration for credit can only be made after all supervisory and support requirements have been assured and the formal research plan is approved. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Offered on demand.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
GEOL 496Internship1.00 - 4.00
On-the-job experience with local agencies and research laboratories to provide students with practical knowledge of careers in the field of geology. Designed to provide students with realistic opportunities to apply their skills to practical problems. Registration for credit can only be made after all supervisory and support requirements have been made. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Offered on demand.
Typically Offered:
Fall, Spring, and Summer Terms
 
NSED - Natural Sciences Education
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
NSED 389Natural Science Education Elective0.00 - 12.00
Transfer credit ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
 
PHYS - Physics
Catalog Nbr.Course Title/Course TopicsCredits
PHYS 100Astronomy4.00
Includes a brief history of astronomy, the study of the motions and structures of the Earth, the moon, the sun, planets, stars and galaxies and consideration of cosmological theories. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science laboratory class. Offered on campus Fall Terms only, and on line Spring Terms.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHYS 107Algebra-Based Physics I4.00
Newtonian mechanics and waves. Designed for students majoring in the humanities, education, medical sciences, or biological sciences. Not open to students with a major in Chemistry or Mathematics. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Science laboratory class.
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Prerequisites:
MATH 102, 113 or 115 with grade of C-or better or math placement test is required.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHYS 108Algebra-Based Physics II4.00
Continuation of PHYS 107 covering electricity, magnetism, and light. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
PHYS 107 or 201 with a grade of C- or better.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHYS 160Physical Science4.00
Laboratory-oriented course covering the basic concepts of physics and chemistry. Meets the General Education requirement for Natural Sciences laboratory class, recommended for elementary education majors. (Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.) Offered Fall Term on-line and Spring Term on-campus
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Typically Offered:
Fall and Spring Terms
PHYS 189Physics Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHYS 201Calculus-Based Physics I5.00
Newtonian mechanics, waves and thermodynamics. Meets the University Studies Program requirement for Natural Science laboratory class. (Lecture four hours, laboratory two hours.)
University Studies Requirements:
Natural Sciences - Lab
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 240.
Typically Offered:
Fall Term Only
PHYS 202Calculus-Based Physics II5.00
Electricity, magnetism, and light. (Lecture four hours, laboratory two hours.)
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 241 and PHYS 201 or PHYS 205.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHYS 205Calculus Applications in Introductory Physics I1.00
Supplemental to introductory non-calculus-based PHYS 107 course. Covers the calculus applications which are normally covered in the calculus-based course Physics 201. Students who have taken PHYS 107 may decide to supplement their physics background with this course to gain access to higher level courses which have calculus-based physics as a pre-requisite.
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 107, Math 240 and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 206Calculus Applications in Introductory Physics II1.00
Supplemental to introductory non-calculus based PHYS 108. Covers the calculus applications which are normally covered in the calculus-based course PHYS 202. Students who have taken PHYS 108 may decide to supplement their physics background with this course to gain access to higher-level courses which have calculus-based physics as a pre-requisite.
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 108, MATH 241 and instructor consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 281Selected Topics1.00 - 6.00
May be offered for individualized or multiple-student instruction on a particular topic. May be independent study, lecture or laboratory. Topics(s) selected based on student interest with approval of instructor. Prerequisites: At least one semester of physics. Offered upon sufficient demand.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 289Physics Elective1.00 - 99.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHYS 300History and Philosophy of Science3.00
Examines the nature of science, the history of science, and the nature and history of the impact of science on human life and thought. Provides some understanding of the methods of science, the difference between science and pseudo science, the political and ideological uses of science, and the moral responsibilities of scientists and science educators. Cross listed as PHIL/PHYS 300.
Typically Offered:
Spring Term Only
PHYS 311Mechanics4.00
Classical mechanics, mathematical techniques using vector calculus, conservation laws and their relation to symmetry principles, rigid body dynamics, accelerated coordinate systems, and introduction to the generalized coordinate formalisms of LaGrange and Hamiltion. (Lecture four hours.)
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 241 and PHYS 201 or 205 is required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 321Electrical Circuits and Electronics2.00 - 4.00
Laboratory based course in analog and digital circuits, AC and DC circuits, resonance, filters, transistors, operational amplifies, logic, memory, microprocessors and computer architecture.
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 202 or 206 or instructor Consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 325Wave Motion and Optics3.00
Wave phenomena with specific applications to plane electromagnetic waves, reflection, refraction, guided waves and the process of radiation.
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 202 or 206 or instructor Consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 375Physics Laboratory1.00 - 3.00
Extended laboratory experiments selected to give experiences in advanced physics concepts and techniques. Experiments are agreed upon between the instructor and student. (Laboratory two-six hours.) May be repeated when topics are different. Instructor consent required for taking this course.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 381Intermediate Topics1.00 - 6.00
May be offered for individualized or multiple-student instruction on a particular topic. May be independent study, lecture or laboratory. Topic(s) selected based on student interest with approval of instructor. May be repreated when topics are different.
Prerequisites:
Completion of MATH 241 and PHYS 201 or 205 is required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 389Physics Elective1.00 - 9.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHYS 398Physics Tutorial Project1.00 - 4.00
Tutoring students in 100-level physics courses under supervision of a physics staff member. (Three hours per week per credit.)
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 108 or 202.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 401Modern Physics3.00
Non-classical phenomena and their explanation in relativity and quantum mechanics. Topics include Special Relativity, relativistic transformations, E=mc2 spacetime, wave-particle duality of matter and light, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, Schrodinger's equation, atomic physics, quantum numbers, spin, nuclear physics, radioactivity, nuclear forces, and the Standard Model.
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 202 or PHYS 206.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 448Atomic And Quantum Physics4.00
Introduction to the philosophy and mathematics of quantum mechanics, including uncertainty, wave-particle duality, problem solving in tunneling and boundary conditions, time-dependent wave functions, the quantum mechanics of hydrogen, alkali metals, and chemical bonding. (Lecture four hours.)
Prerequisites:
Completion of PHYS 202 or 206 or instructor Consent.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 481Special Topics1.00 - 6.00
In-depth study of specialized current topics in physics selected by the faculty on the basis of community interest. May include workshops, seminars, field trips, special problems, independent study. May be repeated when topics are different. Instructor consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand
PHYS 489Physics Elective1.00 - 12.00
Transfer credits ONLY from another accredited institution not equivalent to a UW-Superior course.
PHYS 491Physics Research1.00 - 4.00
Individual laboratory and/or theoretical investigation of a problem selected by the student and faculty or other skilled supervisor. The project will include study of related literature and formal reporting. Designed to give junior/senior level students practical experience in physics research. May be repeated for a total of four credits. Instructor Consent required.
Typically Offered:
Occasional by Demand

Natural Sciences Department Contact Information Top of Page

Natural Sciences Department
University of Wisconsin - Superior
Barstow Hall 202
Belknap and Catlin Ave.
P.O. Box 2000
Superior, WI 54880
Phone: 715-394-8322
Email: natsci@uwsuper.edu