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Frequently Asked Questions

About COVID-19 Expand All

What is coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing respiratory illness in people and others circulating among animals. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can evolve and infect people and then spread between people. Previous coronavirus outbreaks have included severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) believes the risk to the American public of becoming infected with this novel coronavirus is currently low. Because this is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation, the CDC will provide updated information as it becomes available, including any changes in the risk assessment.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services has created website focused on coronavirus, including information data on confirmed cases. Douglas County Public Health also has coronavirus information on its website.

How does it spread?

Current understanding about how the virus that causes coronavirus spreads is largely based on what is known about similar coronaviruses. COVID-19 is a new disease and there is more to learn about how it spreads, the severity of illness it causes, and to what extent it may spread in the United States. Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website for the latest information on what is known about how coronavirus spreads.

What are the symptoms of this infection?

Symptoms of COVID-19 may include the following:

  • Fever
  • Coughing
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Contact your primary health provider or Student Health & Counseling Services if you are experiencing Influenza-like symptoms. Students can access discounted medical services at St. Lukes Mariner Medical Clinic. Courtesy Cab is available for students who reside on campus and need transportation to St. Lukes Mariner Medical Clinic at no cost. To arrange a ride, call 218-590-9222 and identify yourself as a UW-Superior student. Visit Student Health & Counseling Services for more information.  

If you have returned in the past 14 days from travel to an area with widespread or ongoing community spread (Level 3 travel health notice), the CDC advises you to stay home for 14 days from the time you left that area and practice social distancing. Visit the CDC's travel information page for more information.

Additionally, if you have NOT returned in the past 14 days from travel to a country with a COVID-19 outbreak OR have NOT been exposed to someone with confirmed COVID-19, but do have fever and respiratory symptoms seek medical advice and call ahead to your health-care provider or nurse advice line. Please do not show up at a clinic, urgent care, emergency room or other health facility without calling first. Your provider will need to take special measures to protect other people in the clinic. 

I feel anxious about coronavirus.  What can I do?

We understand that some community members are concerned. If you would like to talk with someone, support is available through Student Health & Counseling Services or the Employee Assistance Program.

You can help prevent the spread of colds and other viral ailments by doing the following:

  • Get vaccinated for the flu
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60%-95% alcohol immediately after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, then throw the tissue in the trash and wash your hands. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your sleeve.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces

If you are feeling ill, stay at home or in your residence hall room.

Where can I get more information about the novel coronavirus?

For current information about this evolving public health situation, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization’s websites devoted to coronavirus.

Additionally, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Douglas County Public Health, Minnesota Department of Health and St. Louis County have information regarding coronavirus.

Who is at higher risk of getting sick from coronavirus?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, early information out of China, where COVID-19 first started, shows that some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this illness. This includes:

  • Older adults
  • People with underlying medical conditions

For more information on people at risk for serious illness, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's website

Are there any confirmed cases in our area?

For information on activity level by region and county, please visit the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. The Minnesota Department of Health also offers weekly reports.  

Health, wellness and prevention Expand All

What do I do if I feel sick?

If you are sick, stay home. If you develop symptoms — such as a fever, cough or shortness of breath — within 14 days of your return from personal or official travel to a country with a COVID-19 outbreak OR have been exposed to someone with confirmed COVID-19, please take the steps listed below.

Additionally, if you have NOT returned in the past 14 days from travel to a country with a COVID-19 outbreak OR have NOT been exposed to someone with confirmed COVID-19 but do have fever and respiratory symptoms, please also take the following steps.

First: Contact your primary health provider or Student Health & Counseling Services if you are experiencing Influenza-like symptoms. Students can access discounted medical services at St. Lukes Mariner Medical Clinic. Courtesy Cab is available for students who reside on campus and need transportation to St. Lukes Mariner Medical Clinic at no cost. To arrange a ride, call 218-590-9222 and identify yourself as a UW-Superior student. Visit Student Health & Counseling Services for more information.  

Employees should contact their primary health provider.  

Second: If you have returned in the past 14 days from travel to an area with widespread or ongoing community spread (Level 3 travel health notice), the CDC and the Wisconsin Department of Health Services advise you to stay home for 14 days from the time you left that area and practice social distancing. Visit the CDC's travel information page for more information and follow the 14-day voluntary self-quarantine and self-monitoring instructions listed below.

Self-quarantine (isolation of people who are healthy and exposed) instruction:

  • Stay home (or other location approved by your local health department). This means do not go to school, work, public areas, or attend large gatherings. If you need medical care, call your health care provider. Call ahead before you go to your doctor’s office or to an emergency room. Tell them your symptoms and that you traveled to an area of the world experiencing a COVID-19 outbreak.
  • Do not use public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.
  • Postpone any travel. If travel is absolutely necessary, you need to coordinate with your local health department. If you travel and become ill, you may not be able to return home.
  • Wash your hands often and practice good hygiene.
  • As long as you feel healthy, you may leave the home (in a private vehicle) for a limited time to take care of routine and necessary activities, such as grocery shopping or visiting the pharmacy. Try to avoid busy times of day.
  • Postpone all non-essential medical appointments until you are out of quarantine. If you have an essential appointments during the quarantine, please tell your local health department who will help coordinate the visit.
  • Consider minimizing contact with people and animals in your home (stay in your own room and, if possible, use your own bathroom). Avoid sharing personal household items such as dishes, towels, and bedding.

Self-monitoring instructions:

  • Measure your temperature twice a day. If you do not have a thermometer, or need instructions for using one, let your local public health department know.
  • Watch for cough or difficulty breathing.

Protocols from local hospitals and CDC

I want to get tested for COVID-19.  Where can I go?

Information on how to get tested can be found on the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene website or contact your local health provider.

UW System campuses, including UW-Superior, will be offering COVID-19 antigen testing to all residential students every two weeks. If antigen tests come back positive, UW-Superior will provide additional diagnostic testing through St. Luke's. 

A summary of COVID-19 test results from each UW System university is available in the Daily On-Campus COVID-19 Testing report.

How do I help prevent the spread of viruses, including coronavirus?

You can reduce the risk of spreading coronaviruses by taking the same steps as you would to prevent infection from the flu and the common cold:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60%-95% alcohol immediately after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, then throw the tissue in the trash and wash your hands. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your sleeve.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces
  • Practice social distancing, staying at least six feet apart
  • Wear a mask

If you are feeling ill, stay at home or in your residence hall room.

What should I do if I have an underlying health condition or am immunosuppressed?

People with preexisting health conditions are at higher risk to develop complications from a COVID-19 infection. Your health is the top priority, so public health officials may recommend that you stay home if there are more community infections. Your health care team can also help you assess your current medications and conditions to help you think about actions that can minimize risk to you and your household.

What should I do if I or someone I know has tested positive or has symptoms for COVID-19?

In an effort to best care for our students and campus community, we are asking individuals to report if a student or employee:

  • has tested positive for COVID-19 or has symptoms of COVID-19, or 
  • was/is in close contact with someone who has COVID-19.

Please complete this voluntary, confidential online form if you know someone has tested positive or has symptoms for COVID-19.

Completion of this form will enable the university to take care of those most deeply impacted by this virus, including the individual and our campus community. 

Should I wear a face mask?

In accordance with UW System recommendations, the State of Wisconsin Emergency Order and the City of Superior, face coverings (such as masks or face shields for those who need an accommodation) are required in all indoor public spaces with limited exceptions and strongly encouraged outside when physical distancing is not possible. We recognize that the requirement of wearing a face covering will be a cultural shift for our campus community, but we also know that wearing one is among the most important ways we can help keep each other safe and healthy. It's important to note that people can spread COVID-19 to others even if they do not feel sick.   

If you forgot your face covering, you may pick up a disposable mask at one of these locations:

  • Technology Services Help Desk, Swenson 2100
  • Jim Dan Hill Library Front Desk
  • Yellowjacket Union Front Desk
  • Marcovich Wellness Center Front Desk

Limited exceptions include:

  1. An individual’s own health condition prevents wearing the mask and the individual has received an approved exception from Human Resources (for employees) or Disability Support Services (for students).*  
  2. An exemption from wearing a mask will occur when appropriate medical documentation from a medical provider is submitted and approved.* 
  3. When working in a personal office or other non-shared space or while in one’s own residence hall room.* 
  4. In environments where hazards exist that create a greater risk by wearing a mask. 
  5. While performing physical exertion, vocal or instrumental performance, manual labor, exercising or during athletic competition. 
  6. While in an indoor area designated for eating food and social distancing has been maintained. 

*In cases where a mask cannot be worn and social distancing cannot be maintained, alternative methods (face shields) must be utilized to limit potential transmission of COVID-19. If a face shield cannot be utilized for medical reasons, then the employee should telecommute, or the student should seek accommodations to obtain their education via distance learning and seek an exemption from on campus housing (if applicable).  

Residence Halls: Residents are expected to wear a face covering at all times while outside of a resident’s room. Face coverings must be worn while in hallways and common areas such as kitchens, laundry rooms, restrooms and in the lobby. Face coverings are not required when it is not conducive to performing a task (i.e. brushing your teeth, showering, eating, drinking, etc.).

Athletics: As part of the university’s safety procedures, all student-athletes, coaches, staff and student workers will be required to wear face coverings. Student-athletes will be permitted to not wear a covering during physical activity, such as working out, practice or during competition.  

Student Face Covering Pickup: Students will receive five reusable face masks for their use. Residential students will receive their masks during their move-in. Nonresidential students can pick up their masks at the Yellowjacket Union front desk. 

Employee Face Covering Pickup: Supervisors should pick up masks and face shields for their units at the University Services Building in the mailroom. For the academic departments, Dean Nick Danz will be working with the recovery team to coordinate delivery for these units. 

I have family and friends in the area directly affected by the novel coronavirus.  How can I manage my concern for them?

As with any natural or human-inflicted disaster, the novel coronavirus outbreak presents an added layer of stress and worry for members of our campus community who have personal connections to the affected area. This is a critically important time for all of us to reinforce a community of care on our campus and support one another.

If you would like to talk with someone, support is available to students through Student Health & Counseling and to employees through the Employee Assistance Program.

University Operations Expand All

Will UW-Superior be open this fall?

The University of Wisconsin-Superior is welcoming students, faculty and staff to the fall semester. Visit the Fall 2020 Microsite for more information. 

Are campus visits, tours and information sessions being affected at this time?

UW-Superior is offering both in-person and virtual visit experiences for prospective students. Visit our Fall 2020 Microsite for more information, or schedule your personalized visit

Will athletic teams be able to play this fall?

Please visit our Fall 2020 Microsite for more information. 

 

Classes and academics for students Expand All

Will UW-Superior cancel classes this fall?

Classes will take place this fall. For more information on UW-Superior's course plans, please visit the Fall 2020 Microsite

Classes and academics for faculty and other academic personnel Expand All

Will UW-Superior cancel classes this fall?

Classes will take place this fall. For more information on UW-Superior's course plans, please visit the Fall 2020 Microsite

Employee/Human Resources Expand All

What do I do if I have a sick family member who needs my care?

An employee should contact their immediate supervisor and utilize the proper departmental notification procedures if they cannot work their scheduled shift.

UW System has implemented Interim Administrative Policy 1200-Interim 03, FMLA Expansion, which provides additional paid family and medical leave (FMLA) for a qualifying need related to a public health emergency. For the purposes of this policy, COVID-19 Leave used on or after April 1, 2020 count against an employee’s 12 weeks of FMLA leave if that time is being used to care for a dependent under the age of 18 whose school or place of care has been closed or is unavailable due to a public health emergency. The United States Department of Labor has made available a poster identifying employee rights for further information.

 

I have been exposed to COVID 19 but am not symptomatic.  I have been quarantined by a public health official.  What should I do?

An employee should contact their immediate supervisor and utilize the proper departmental notification procedures if they cannot work their scheduled shift.

Employees who were exposed but not symptomatic can work remotely if possible and can do so with their supervisor’s and Human Resources’ approval.

Per UWS 1212, if sick or other leave is utilized in excess of five consecutive workdays, employees must submit a written certification from a health care provider of the medical necessity of the absences (and will need to present a return to work note). This can come from the Public Health Department upon release from quarantine.

Employees may apply for Family and Medical Leave (FMLA). The definition of a serious health condition under the FMLA may apply.

I am sick and have been placed in isolation by a public health official.  What should I do?

An employee should contact their immediate supervisor and utilize the proper departmental notification procedures if they cannot work their scheduled shift.

Employees who were exposed but not symptomatic can work remotely if possible and can do so with their supervisor’s and Human Resources’ approval.

Per UWS 1212, if sick or other leave is utilized in excess of five consecutive workdays, employees must submit a written certification from a health care provider of the medical necessity of the absences (and will need to present a return to work note). This can come from the Public Health Department upon release from quarantine.

Employees may apply for Family and Medical Leave (FMLA). The definition of a serious health condition under the FMLA may apply.

Please consult the UW Superior Short-Term Telecommuting Agreement