TRIO McNair Scholars Cohort 2019-2020

Nell Barri

University of Wisconsin-Superior
Mentor: Amy LaRue

Title

Tobacco Cessation Programs and Tobacco Related Comorbidities on the Red Cliff Reservation

Poster

Nell Barri Final Poster

Abstract

Native American populations experience disproportionately high rates of tobacco use which leads to high rates of tobacco-related comorbidities. The traditional use of tobacco is an important consideration when attempting to address these health disparities. Current literature shows that there is a need for culturally appropriate tobacco cessation programs, yet information and accessibility to these types of programs is limited. Using surveys administered through Qualtrics Survey Software, this research project looked into the association between tobacco cessation programs and tobacco-related comorbidities on the Red Cliff Reservation. SPSS Statistics software was used to analyze the data and indicated that there is a strong positive correlation between not only tobacco use and tobacco-related comorbidities but also the knowledge of existing tobacco cessation programs and tobacco use on the Red Cliff Reservation.

Amanda Foster

University of Wisconsin-Superior
Mentor: Nathan LaCoursiere
LinkedIn

Title

Justice Running on Fumes: Analysis of the Reduction of Public Legal Services Funding in Wisconsin from 2010 to 2020 and Resulting Impacts on Indigent and Low-Income Access to Civil Legal Services and Representation in Northern Wisconsin

Poster

Amanda Foster Final Poster

Abstract

Northern Wisconsin is one of the most underserved areas of the country for legal services. This review highlights the substantial decline in State public funding for low-income legal services and the resulting impact on Judicare’s ability to serve the upper 33 counties and 11 tribal nations of Wisconsin. This is a primary and secondary source literature, public and non-profit data analysis. The results of the analysis show: as funding has been cut, the amount of low-income cases handled every year has dropped precipitously, while the number of client requests, contacts and needs have stayed consistently high. Another finding: there is a limited number of individuals and families that qualify to use Judicare. This paper recommends further consideration of how the Wisconsin Bar works with Judicare in pro-bono and low-bono cases and possibly stipulating hour requirements for attorneys licensed in the state. Ideally, the state would go back to pre-2010 funding. 

Makayla Gille

University of Wisconsin-Superior
Mentor: Mimi Rappley-Larson
Instagram | Facebook

Title

Resiliency Skills & Veterans: Do they matter?

Poster

Makayla Gille Research Poster

Abstract

Veterans struggle with numerous hardships and trauma after returning home from their service. The purpose of this study is to learn how an individual’s current hardships and from their post-combat issues can be dealt with the use of certain resiliency skills and what occurs when these skills are absent.

Madison Hale

University of Wisconsin-Superior
Mentor: Cherie Dakota

Title

Health Care Disparities and Needs in Native American Veteran Population

Poster

Madison Hale Research Poster

Abstract

Many American Indian Veterans struggle in navigating Veteran Affairs Assistance. This research assesses if there are still barriers to Native American Veterans in receiving benefits within the healthcare system even after the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Indian Health Services (IHS) and other programs aiming at bridging the gaps in needs. Participants consisted primarily of Veterans and Active Service Members throughout Minnesota and Wisconsin. The research focused on six key issues addressed in previous research as areas of improvement (Access to Specialty Services, Family Care, Culturally Competent Care, Outpatient Care, Tele-Health, and Transportation). The response rate was low; however, themes were identified from the data collected.  There will need to be further research conducted for a better representation.

Lily Hall

University of Minnesota, Duluth
Mentor: Allen Mensinger
LinkedIn

Title

Effects of boat motor playback on nesting and non-nesting bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus)

Poster

Lily Hall Research Poster

Abstract

Although anthropogenic activity and sound levels have been increasing in freshwater ecosystems, their effect on freshwater species is relatively unexplored. Boat motor sound is a prominent stimulus that the recreational use of lakes adds to the freshwater soundscape. Bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) are a common target of anglers and therefore can experience frequent boat motor sound. This experiment examined the effect boat motor playback had on nesting bluegills in a small Minnesotan lake. A boat motor recording was played via an underwater speaker near nesting bluegills, and the bluegills’ orientation angles to the speaker were examined before, during, and after sound playback. Also, non-nesting bluegills were examined to explore potential differences in behavior compared to nesting bluegills.

Mr. Hamlet

University of Wisconsin-Superior
Mentor: Ephraim Nikoi

Title

The Blank Papers - Examining Men & Their De-legitimized Victimhood (Volume One)

Poster

Shawn Hamlet Research Poster

Abstract

This research paper holds that men generally do not know how to recognize when they are being abused by women; and that men do not know how to deal with the abuse once it is discovered. This paper takes a qualitative dive into the mainly unexplored stories of men and societies attempt to control how men deal with their plight surrounding their engagement with women; it argues that women do not have a monopoly on being victims of abuse.

Deon Haywood

University of Wisconsin-Superior
Mentor: Eleni Pinnow
Facebook

Title

The Well-Being of People During the COVID-19 outbreak

Poster

Deon Haywood Research Poster

Abstract

This research paper will focus on people’s well-being pertaining to the COVID-19 pandemic. The research question that will be asked is, how are people’s well-being related to their social distance adherence? Three hundred and seventy-eight adults over 18 years old participated in a Qualtrics survey without compensation. Participants were recruited from the University of Wisconsin-Superior, social media, and word of mouth. Demographic information, such as race/ethnicity and gender identity were collected. The results that were obtained matter because it is important to know how people are feeling about and what they are doing the cope with how COVID-19 has changed the world around them

Brittney Hubbell

University of Wisconsin-Superior
Mentor: Kurt Schmude
LinkedIn

Title

Foraging of Pollen by Subspecies of Honeybee, Apis mellifera: Italian vs. Carnolian

Poster

Brittney Hubbell Research Poster

Abstract

Honeybees are non-native to the Unites States and different subspecies can be brought into the United States.  Apis mellifera has up to 30 subspecies in different regions of the world (Pentek-Zakar et al. 2015).  The purpose of this study was to determine if Italian (Apis mellifera ligustica) and Carniolan (Apis mellifera carnica) subspecies of honeybee forage on the pollen from the same flowering plants. To provide supporting evidence that the honeybees are not foraging on the same pollen this study shows counts made from pollen samples on microscope slides of multiple hives of both races of honeybee. Three slides were created for each day of collection over a two-week span.  Averages were calculated from counts per day by thirty potential opportunities for the pollen type to be present and used to compare what each subspecies foraged on each day. 

Shaian Kong

University of Minnesota, Duluth
Mentor: Charern Lee

Title

Fear of Crime in College Campus Housing: Precautionary Actions

Poster

Shaian Kong Research Poster

Abstract

This study uses a preexisting dataset to analyze the effects of precautionary actions that students who live on college campuses may experience. College campuses can be crime generators and fear of crime producers. The results of this study explore students’ personal and community safety behaviors, defensive behaviors, avoidance behaviors, police satisfaction, knowledge of conduct reporting and disciplinary actions, and knowledge of housing codes and violations. The results show that students who participate in avoidance behaviors (α = .57; p= .001), students who participate in personal and community behaviors (α = .51; p= .03), and students who are satisfied with campus policing (α = .82; p= .03) were found to have higher levels of fear of crime at night. Also found was that those who have more knowledge of housing codes and violations experienced less fear of crime at night (α = .54; p= .03).

Mandelyn Lyons

Northland College
Mentor: Kevin Schanning, Angela Stroud

Title

Surprising Racial Twist: Racialized Discourse in Media Coverage of COVID-19

Poster

Mandelyn Lyons Research Poster

Abstract

COVID-19 has been shown to disproportionately affect Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) communities, and media has covered a variety of possible reasons for this phenomenon. However, most media use problematic language that is consistent with racialization of illness and color-blind racial frames that constructs COVID-19 as a highly racialized virus. Racialization of COVID-19 allows for pre-existing health conditions to be naturalized by erasing the structural systems which produce those health outcomes.  Racialization also occurs with data and statistics that do not account for human experience nor for racist social systems. The way in which racial data is collected also adds to confusion about race categories, which are fluid meaning there are not one way to collect data. Utilizing an ethnographic content analysis, this study examines the ways in which media deploy language such that people of color are constructed as inherently diseased or susceptible to illness.

Andres Peña

University of Minnesota, Duluth
Mentor: Steven Matthews

Title

Literalism and its Impact on the Commentaries of the Book of Revelation in the 16th and 17th Century British Isles

Poster

Andres Pena Research Poster

Abstract

The rise of the literalism in biblical interpretation had brought about many strange innovations within theology and the Church. The historical development of the literal sense of scripture can be seen beginning in the Medieval ages leading to the Reformation. It is with this idea of the literal sense that interpreters of the Bible have come to interpret traditionally figurative texts with literal historical happening. This can be seen in the British Isles during the late 16th and 17th century. The text of Revelation was used by all groups within British society to push their own agendas by reading historical events into the text. The historical-literal interpretation of Revelation is the offspring of thought stemming from the rise of the literal sense.

Jessica Smith

University of Wisconsin-Superior
Mentor: Kat Werchouski, Allison Willingham
Website | Facebook

Title

A Survivor’s View on Missing and Murdered Indigenous People : A Healing Journey of Raising Survivor and Grassroots Warrior Voices

Poster

Jessica Smith Research Poster

Abstract

Native people are at exceptionally high risk for poverty, homelessness, and sexual violence, which are elements in the trafficking of Native people. They are at extremely high risk for violence and emotional trauma, and the needs of Native people are generally not being met. I review the underlying issues of historical and multi-generational trauma that contribute to women and girls being vulnerable to sex traffickers. I review colonialism and how the loss of Culture has affected Indigenous people, playing a role in the high rates of violence among them. I review statutes and criminal charges for traffickers, safe harbor laws, and the need for a nationwide statute to protect victims. I review the dimensions of how technology plays a part in sex trafficking, stalking, and online harassment. I review current resources for survivors or the lack thereof, and how survivors can begin to rebuild their lives, reclaim their voices, and start the healing process. Keywords: Sex trafficking, violence, healing, two-spirit, missing and murdered, grassroots, Indigenous people, Native people.

Michelle Vue

University of Minnesota, Duluth
Mentor: Charern Lee

Title

The Impact of Cyberbullying Victimization on Youth Suicide: Age, Race, and Sex as Predictors of Suicidal Behaviors

Poster

Michelle Vue Research Poster

Abstract

This research studies the associations among age, race, sex, cyberbullying victimization, and suicidal behaviors in 2,670 middle school and high school students using data from a 2016 cyberbullying survey. The overall research set out to study whether females are more likely than males to experience suicidal ideation and suicidal attempt as a result of cyberbullying victimization. Results suggest that victims of cyberbullying are more likely to experience suicidal behaviors. Older students are also more likely to experience suicidal ideation and suicidal attempt as a result of cyberbullying victimization. White adolescents are more likely to experience suicidal attempt compared to non-white adolescents. There was no significant relationship between female victims of cyberbullying and suicidality. Findings suggest that there needs to be more research done on race, age, cyberbullying victimization, suicidality, and reporting behaviors. Other statistical analyses are needed to examine the relationship between sex, cyberbullying victimization, and suicidal behaviors.

Cheyanne Wilber

University of Minnesota, Duluth
Mentor: Jennifer Liang

Title

The causes and identification of transcripts of Neural Tube Defects in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

Poster

Cheyanne Wilber Research Poster

Abstract

This paper explores the process of neurulation in zebrafish and looks further into the genes to determine which are correlated with the development of neural tube defects (NTDs).  We will be working with 3,187 transcripts of RNA and running them through a program called the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID).  This program will group the transcripts into pathways and provide visualization.  We will be looking at three developmental stages important to neurulation, shield stage, 7-somite stage, and tailbud stage. The hope is after running the transcripts through DAVID, we will find common pathways associated among the three stages.  I hypothesize there will be common pathways found between the three developmental stages after DAVID analysis is complete.  After final analysis was run through DAVID, there were two common pathways, the RIG-i-like Receptors pathway and the Metabolism pathway, between the shield and 7-somite stages. There were no common pathways associated with the tailbud stage.  This supported my original hypothesis that there would be common pathways between the three stages.  Further research is needed to see if these pathways truly do have a correlation with neurulation.