The one-two punch

Posted on Apr 19, 2018
The journey for UW-Superior student Amy Lemanager’s success has been a path with many twists.

The University of Wisconsin-Superior prides itself in offering large-campus opportunities with a small-campus feeling. In the area of athletics, it boasts 17 NCAA Division III sports teams, more than 60 student organizations, plus an array of music ensembles and theatre productions, there is something for every interest. With nearly all the ‘bases covered’, there’s one sport not represented on campus – until now.

Amy Lemanger may be the first female boxer on campus.

Lemanager, a criminal justice major from Duluth, is currently ranked fifth in the country at her 165-pound weight class. She recently competed in the United States Intercollegiate Boxing Association National Championship hosted by the University of Illinois. With competitors from schools throughout the country – many with organized NCAA or club teams – Lemanager claimed victory in her class.

“It was a good fight,” said Lemanager. I gave [my opponent] two standing eight counts in the first round. It was a fun fight to be a part of.”

UW-Superior student Amy Lemanger

The journey for Lemanager’s success has been a path with many twists. Her success in the ring actually started in the hockey rink.

“I was in the eighth grade and I was playing hockey and I just wanted to get in shape,” she said. “I have a disease called hypothyroidism. It makes it really hard for me to lose weight, so I was just trying to get into shape and become a better athlete.”

While hockey remained the primary focus for Lemanager, she quickly excelled as a boxer.

“Joe Lorenzi is the owner and head coach at the gym I train at,” said Lemanager. “There’s something called body pads. It’s like a big pad he puts on his chest and he holds mitts. He said just come in here and beat me up, and I was like ‘OK’. I went in and he just let me beat the crap out of him – not actually, because I was, like, 12. I got to hit him as hard as I wanted and I liked it.”

At the urging of her coach, Lemanager began sparring other gym members.

“I started sparring the boys and I gave a couple of them bloody noses,” she said. “I just thought it was super cool that I beat a boy. From there my coach found me a fight. I was super excited and I ended up just doing it and ever since I haven’t stopped.”

While a knee injury after high school spoiled Lemanager’s plans for collegiate hockey, it enabled her to return to Duluth, attend UW-Superior, and continue her commitment to boxing. Lemanager’s success has created quite a following on campus.

“I love it. I seriously love it. I think everything happens for a reason and I definitely was meant to end up here,” she said. “My boyfriend plays on the UW-Superior baseball team, and they’ve been really supportive of me. I have another fight coming up and I know they’re all probably going to be there. The women’s hockey players I’m friends with come to my gym and workout. They come and try it and they love it. It’s just cool and I have a lot of support.”

News Contact: James Biros | 715-394-8260 | jbiros{atuws}
The one-two punch
Posted on Apr 19, 2018
The journey for UW-Superior student Amy Lemanager’s success has been a path with many twists.
UW-Superior student Amy Lemanager competed in the United States Intercollegiate Boxing Association National Championship where she claimed victory.

UW-Superior student Amy Lemanager competed in the United States Intercollegiate Boxing Association National Championship where she claimed victory.

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