August 7, 2018

Catching a trophy

The move from Superior to Gainesville, Fla., has enabled Summer Lindelien ('16 biology major, geographic information systems minor) to follow her passion and a future goal of working for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission conducting research on freshwater fishes, particularly largemouth bass.

The move from Superior to Gainesville, Fla., has enabled Summer Lindelien ('16 biology major, geographic information systems minor) to follow her passion and a future goal of working for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission conducting research on freshwater fishes, particularly largemouth bass.

Alumna awarded 2018 Shimano/B.A.S.S. Nation College Scholarship

With UW-Superior situated on the shores of the greatest Great Lake and within minutes from dozens of inland lakes in Wisconsin and Minnesota, it’s no surprise that fishing is a common hobby among its students, staff and faculty.

Yet it’s likely none have had angling pay off like it has recently for alumna and avid angler Summer Lindelien. She was one of nine $3,000 winners of the 2018 Shimano/B.A.S.S. Nation College Scholarship.

Lindelien, who is currently continuing her education as a graduate research student at the University of Florida, learned about the scholarship from a professor there. Her love for bass fishing and catching giant fish compelled her to apply.

UW-Superior alumna Summer Lindelien

Growing up in Rosemount, Minn., Lindelien chose to attend UW-Superior thanks to both its academics and access to outdoor activities.

“The Natural Sciences Department offered plenty of research involving fish,” she said. “I liked the layout of the City of Superior and the campus in relation to Lake Superior and other surrounding bodies of water for fishing.”

Lindelien, who graduated in 2016 with a major in biology and a minor in geographic information systems (GIS), enjoyed the topics her classes presented.

“I liked learning something new every day,” she said. “I enjoyed the life and work applications biology taught me.”

At UW-Superior, Lindelien was also able to get hands-on experience at the Lake Superior Research Institute (LSRI).

Amy Eliot [LSRI Assistant Scientist] is an amazing person,” said Lindelien. “I also conducted fish age and growth undergraduate research under my advisor Jeff Schuldt [biology professor], who was also one of the most impactful people to come into my life.”

After graduating from UW-Superior, Lindelien left the Twin Ports for research opportunities in central Florida.

“I worked for Natural Resources Research Institute for the summer as an aquatic ecology field and lab tech,” she said. “Then I took a job with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission as a biologist. After working for a little while, I decided I wanted to get my master of science. I was offered a Graduate Research Assistantship at the University of Florida in the fisheries and aquatic sciences department.”

That opportunity allowed Lindelien to continue with more research regarding aging of fishes in her current role.

“I work for the University of Florida as a grad assistant in the fisheries and aquatic sciences department,” she said. “My project is An Assessment of Fin Rays and Fin Spines for Use in Non-lethal Aging of Largemouth Bass, Micropterus Salmoides, in Florida. I age the bass using sagittal otoliths, which is lethal, and fin structures, which is non-lethal. I want to understand if a non-lethal structure can be used for age samples by comparing age estimates and looking at accuracy and precision of those estimates. I work hand-in-hand with Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Verifying the fin structure method would reduce or eliminate mortality during age sampling and enable age-determination of angler-caught largemouth bass such as during tournaments.”

The move from Superior to Gainesville has enabled Lindelien to follow her passion and a future goal of working for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission conducting research on freshwater fishes, particularly largemouth bass.

“There is always more work to be done,” she said. “I come up with new questions to answer through my research every day. I love learning about age and growth of fishes, and I enjoy my field work as well as my lab work of physically aging my samples.”

The move from Superior to Gainesville, Fla., has enabled Summer Lindelien ('16 biology major, geographic information systems minor) to follow her passion and a future goal of working for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission conducting research on freshwater fishes, particularly largemouth bass.

The move from Superior to Gainesville, Fla., has enabled Summer Lindelien ('16 biology major, geographic information systems minor) to follow her passion and a future goal of working for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission conducting research on freshwater fishes, particularly largemouth bass.

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