Theatre has been called the most collaborative of all the arts. At UW-Superior, the theatre program emphasizes personal attention and active student participation.

We offer a diverse range of courses to our students and provide opportunities for participation in other theatres throughout the Twin Ports area.

Facilities

The Theatre Program is located in the Holden and Applied Arts Center, which has multiple performance spaces and the capability to support many different styles of dramatic productions. All of the rooms described below are located in the Holden Fine Arts Center, which is also home to the Music and Art departments.

Spring Production – Almost, Maine

AUDITIONS!

Auditions for UWS Theatre’s Spring Production of Almost, Maine by John Cariani are February 5 & 6 at 6pm in The Experimental Theatre Lab Room 2131! To audition, prepare a short monologue to perform or show up to read a provided text. No experience required, just a passion for storytelling!

Auditions will be held in 6-minute slots on 2/5 & 2/6

Callbacks will be held the following day, Wednesday, February 7, starting at 6:30pm.

Welcome to Almost, Maine, a place that’s so far north, it’s almost not in the United States. It’s almost in Canada. And it’s not quite a town, because its residents never got around to getting organized. So it almost doesn’t exist. One cold, clear, winter night, as the northern lights hover in the star-filled sky above, the residents of Almost, Maine, find themselves falling in and out of love in unexpected and hilarious ways. Knees are bruised. Hearts are broken. But the bruises heal, and the hearts mend—almost—in this delightful midwinter night’s dream.

What To Know:

  • Rehearsals begin Monday, March 18
  • General rehearsal schedule will be Monday – Thursday 6:30pm – 10:00pm (with the possibility of some weekend rehearsals later in the semester.) Schedule is subject to change with advance notice.
  • The dates of the performance will be May 2, 3, & 4 @ 7:30pm and May 5 @ 2:00pm in the Manion Theater. 

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Frequently Asked Questions:

Do I need to prepare a monologue?

You can if you wish, and it’s awesome if you want to show us what you’ve worked on, but it is not required. If you prefer, there will be some text from the play you can read at the audition.

What should I bring?

Yourself! If you have a picture and theatre resume we are happy to accept it, but there will also be a place on the audition form you can tell us a little more about your experience.

Can I get college credit for participating?

Yes! Participating in this production falls under Comm 350 – Creative Collaboration. It is a repeatable course that you can take for anywhere between 1 – 3 credits.

I prefer to be backstage more than be on stage. Is there still a way to get involved?

Absolutely! We are looking for stage managers, assistant stage managers, prop builders, scenic builders, run crew, fight captains, and everything in between! It takes a lot of dedicated individuals to make theatre happen and we want YOU!

I still have questions. Who do I ask?

For more information, email Director Josh Porter at jporter7@uwsuper.edu or Assistant Professor and Director of Theatre Sean Naughton at snaughto@uwsuper.edu

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Almost, Maine is a play in two acts, and is comprised of a prologue, a four-scene first act, an interlogue, a four-scene second act (one of which has two different versions one can choose from), and finally an Epilogue. The title refers to an imagined town in Northern Maine, named Almost, that the playwright, John Cariani, writes, “doesn’t quite exist”. Each scene consists of at least two main characters, and, aside from the Prologue, Interlogue, and Epilogue, none of the characters onstage repeat (though some are mentioned tangentially in later scenes).

There are 19 roles in the play. It was written to be performed by four actors doubling the various roles. The play is structured as 8 vignettes with a prologue, interlogue and epilogue.

CharacterScene / Description
PETEPROLOGUE / INTERLOGUE / EPILOGUE – PETE and GINETTE, who have been dating for a little while.
STEVETHIS HURTS – MARVALYN, a woman who is very good at protecting herself, and STEVE, an open, kind fellow whose brother protects him.
LENDALLGETTING IT BACK – GAYLE and LENDALL, longtime girlfriend and boyfriend.
RANDYTHEY FELL – RANDY and CHAD, two “County boys.”
MANSTORY OF HOPE – HOPE, who has traveled the world, and a MAN, who has not.
GINETTEPROLOGUE / INTERLOGUE / EPILOGUE – PETE and GINETTE, who have been dating for a little while.
GLORYHER HEART – EAST, a repairman, and GLORY, a hiker.
WAITRESSSAD AND GLAD – JIMMY, a heating and cooling guy; SANDRINE, his ex-girlfriend; a salty WAITRESS.
GAYLEGETTING IT BACK – GAYLE and LENDALL, longtime girlfriend and boyfriend.
HOPESTORY OF HOPE – HOPE, who has traveled the world, and a MAN, who has not.
EASTHER HEART – EAST, a repairman, and GLORY, a hiker.
JIMMYSAD AND GLAD – JIMMY, a heating and cooling guy; SANDRINE, his ex-girlfriend; a salty WAITRESS.
CHADTHEY FELL – RANDY and CHAD, two “County boys.”
PHILWHERE IT WENT – PHIL, a working man, and his hardworking wife, MARC!.
DAVESEEING THE THING – RHONDA, a tough woman, and DAVE, the not-so-tough man who loves her.
SANDRINESAD AND GLAD – JIMMY, a heating and cooling guy; SANDRINE, his ex-girlfriend; a salty WAITRESS.
MARVALYNTHIS HURTS – MARVALYN, a woman who is very good at protecting herself, and STEVE, an open, kind fellow whose brother protects him.
MARCIWHERE IT WENT – PHIL, a working man, and his hardworking wife, MARC!.
RHONDASEEING THE THING – RHONDA, a tough woman, and DAVE, the not-so-tough man who loves her.

The Manion Theatre 

Manion Theatre interior

Our main stage performance venue is a 237-seat proscenium theatre with an asymmetrical layout to both the audience seating and the stage itself. A hydraulic orchestra pit can be raised/lowered for the productions, and the main playing area is trapped. In addition, 32 counter weight line sets allow for flying scenic elements out of view; grid height is 60 feet. The proscenium opening is 40 feet by 20 feet. A lighting designer has access to four electrics on the main battens, several floor pockets, two catwalks and four cove positions. The numerous lighting options available make the Manion Theatre a very flexible venue for lighting designs. 

The Experimental Theatre

Experimental Theatre interior

This venue, also referred to as the Black Box, can seat over 100 patrons and measures 33 feet by 50 feet. This flexible space is used for rehearsals, as a classroom space, and as a venue for special student projects, and occasionally hosts our main stage productions. 

The Scene Shop 

Our modern scene shop is located directly between the two performance venues, with over-size doors that allow scenery to be built in the shop and then moved to the main stages. A loading dock immediately adjoins the shop. Besides a wide selection of standard power tools and cordless tools for wood working construction, the scene shop is also set up for welding. It has a modern dust collection system and a hooded paint area. 

The Green Room

Our Green Room connects directly to the backstage of the Manion Theatre and also serves as a general meeting area for students throughout the year. 

Costume Shop & Make-Up

Our Costume Shop area also serves as the general storage area for all fabrics and previous costumes; it is outfitted with multiple sewing machines, sergers and complete laundry facilities. It connects directly to our Make-Up Room, which can easily accommodate a couple of dozen actors at a single sitting. 

Design Room

Our Design room is a work in progress, putting the latest technology within reach of students. Currently, it houses five computer stations loaded with VectorWorks design software for scenes and lighting, and Audition software for sound design work. We’re also adding a 36″-wide plotter to enable students and designers to realize their work in an oversize format. 

Control Booth

Our control booth for the Manion Theatre offers an unparalleled view of the stage for the Stage Manager and board operators. Six-foot-tall windows allow a grandstand view of the playing area, including infrared monitoring of the stage. Sound and light operators utilize modern computerized equipment to run the shows.